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Found 66 results
  1. Content Article
    The aim of this framework, produced by the Royal College of Midwives, is to help Local Maternity Systems and the Maternity Transformation Programme to measure, consistently, the level of continuity of carer being provided over time, not only to monitor delivery, but also to help evaluate the extent to which particular models realise the benefits set out in evidence. This document summarises the policy expectations and then suggests a measurement framework that draws on existing data, or that can be incorporated into other existing data collection thus imposing minimal burden on health care organisations and staff. It provides clarity in terms of how continuity of carer is to be defined and measured, and benchmark data upon which improvement can be measured.
  2. Content Article
    Key highlights Empirical description of safety case development at service level in healthcare. Safety cases can support adoption of proactive and rigorous safety management. Adaptation to purpose and use of safety cases might be required in healthcare. Education should be provided to practitioners and regulators.
  3. Community Post
    Hello I would be interested in hearing from anyone who has done any work on how we monitor patient deterioration overnight? I am currently working on am improvement project looking at patient surveillance of deterioration during night shifts. I have chosen this project as part of a Clinical Improvement Scholarship Program I am on. The program is combined with my day job as a Critical Care Outreach Sister as well as enabling me to develop my research and leadership skills alongside implementing improvements in clinical care. I am in the early stages of my work, however I have some literature and local research around deficiencies in how we monitor patients for deterioration overnight (as well as personal experiences as a CCOT nurse) which is why this topic is so important to me. I would be interested in hearing from anyone who has worked on anything similar, or can point me in the direction of anyone who maybe able to help. Thank you 🙂
  4. Content Article
    Patient Safety Learning works with experts on guidance around ventilator safety As part of the Government’s fast track approach to the development of ventilators, the Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) issued guidance for clinical requirements based on ‘minimally acceptable’ performance. [2] Patient Safety Learning approached a range of human factors/ergonomics experts, asking for their input on the procurement of these new ventilators due to the involvement of new manufacturers, flexing of established guidelines and ‘safety in use’ issues. We asked them what they believed the key issues were in ensuring that these ventilators are safe in use. Experts did express concerns, identifying several risks: By moving at speed and developing non-standard ventilators (with some manufacturers with no prior experience in this area), we may unintentionally be designing a system than has numerous points of failure, increasing risk for patients. How ventilators can be used safely, particularly for staff redeployed in the pandemic who may be inexperienced or untrained in using them. How safe will ventilators be to operate for staff wearing full Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)? Should patients die as a result of safety problems with ventilators, their deaths may not be identified as such, instead being attributed to Covid-19. There are already known safety issues relating to the use of ventilators. For example, there are currently multiple designs of machines used by the NHS, with different training requirements for different devices. We worked with this expert group, who provided detailed advice and guidance to address these risks. Patient Safety Learning then immediately developed proposals for urgent action to ensure that ventilators are safe for use with patients. We called for the healthcare system to work at a pace, together with manufacturers and experts in human factors/ergonomics, in order to minimise the usability safety risks. With our proposals, we provided details of what is required to ensure ventilator safety in use. Experts called for the MPV (Minimum Viable Product) specification to be revised to reflect ‘safety in use’ requirements with an immediate design, development and test sprint approach with human engineering user trials, task analysis and hazard analysis. NHS and Chartered Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors (CIEHF) work quickly to design new guidance So, what happened next? Initially there was a swift response. NHS England and NHS Improvement asked the CIEHF to provide designers and manufacturers with guidance aiding the rapid production of new ventilators. CIEHF subsequently designed guidance, sending it to NHS England within 48 hours. The guide, Human Factors in the Design and Operation of Ventilators for Covid-19, was then to be sent to manufacturers of ventilators in the UK.[3] Soon after CIEHF also developed a ‘rapid and easy to use’ testing protocol to assist manufacturers with testing. CIEHF have developed overarching advice and guidance and testing protocol. To support this, a detailed set of user requirements has been developed by Dr Sue Whalley Lloyd and Karen Priestly. They have worked with, and adapted, Yorkshire Water’s general human factors guidance and have produced a detailed Engineering Specification: Ventilator HF Design guidance. We need to address the risk to patient safety We’ve seen an enormous amount of activity these past few weeks towards the design and production of new ventilators; something that would usually take months or even years. However, there are still serious concerns about the process to date and outstanding safety issues. It’s vital that we meet the urgent need for additional ventilators in the UK, however it cannot be at the cost of patient safety. Concerns about the Government’s response The Government has come under increasing pressure in recent weeks over its handling of this issue. This has been, in part, because it decided not to order ventilators through the EU’s procurement scheme. This has resulted in a more urgent need for scaling up production within the UK.[4] There have also been questions raised around the number of ventilators required. Initial estimates of 30,000 have since been cut down by more than a third to 18,000. [5] [6] [7] Efforts to engage more UK manufacturers in the production of new ventilators have also proved to be complicated, with only one new model to date, Penlon’s ESO2 device, receiving approval from the MHRA.[8] While this covers a provisional order for 5,000 ventilators, there are a significant number of other applications still waiting the regulatory clearance that will be needed to meet the revised 18,000 target. Meanwhile, another provisional order has been forced to withdraw, as a model from the Renault and Red Bull Formula 1 teams was found to not be suitable for treating patients with Covid-19. [9] “Don’t bother, you’re wasting your time” There has been increasing clinical concern about the Government’s decision to move away from standard specification and known manufacturers. Some of these concerns have related to the minimum specification for the ventilator programme set out by the MHRA, suggesting that it will not lead to the production of machines that are suitable for treating Covid-19 patients. Dr Alison Pittard, Dean of the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine, has raised concerns about the minimum specifications.[10] The MHRA guidance states that “it is proposed these ventilators would be for short-term stabilisation for a few hours”.[11] Dr Pittard has said that the group of medical professionals that advised the Government on this in March suggested that these machines should be capable of working for the a patient’s full time in intensive care.[12] She noted that: “If we had been told that that was the case, that the ventilators were only to treat a patient for a few hours, we’d have said: “don’t bother, you’re wasting your time. That’s of no use whatsoever.”[13] Compounding this issue, the standards that currently exist in this area are not formal regulatory requirements. The MHRA state that: “They are not formal regulatory requirements, but many are harmonised against regulatory requirements. Consider them as helpful advisory standards for now. MHRA will lead an exercise to define which can be ‘safely’ relaxed for this emergency situation.”[14] This is not simply a technical issue. If we can’t ensure ventilators are being produced to the right standards, to deliver the right care and to be used safely, then it will inevitably result in errors and could ultimately cost lives. Critical safety questions for the Government Considering these concerns, Patient Safety Learning believes that it is vital that the Government responds to the following critical ventilator safety questions: Safety standards Are the standards for ventilators issued to manufacturers fit for purpose? Are MHRA ensuring that these standards are being applied? These standards are not currently formal regulatory requirements. Should they be? Utilising expertise Has the expert guidance on ventilator safety in use, developed by CIEHF and others, been issued to manufacturers by NHS England and NHS Improvement or the MHRA? If yes, are manufacturers required to apply this guidance? Is it advisory or is it mandatory? Are manufacturers who comply with the guidance and usability protocols given an advantage in the procurement process? Are regulators signing off new ventilators against this guidance? Delivery, communication and timescales Currently only one of the manufacturers of new ventilators has received approval. What is the timescale for delivery of the new ventilators and how does this match estimated demand? How are the NHS and MHRA communicating with patients, staff and the public to assure them that the new ventilators will be safe in use? Monitoring performance How will ventilator ‘safety in use’ be monitored and reported on? Are NHS providers and clinicians being asked to strengthen their incident reporting, particularly where manufacturers have developed novel approaches? References Gov.uk, Call for business to help make NHS ventilators, Last Accessed 15 April 2020. Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, Rapidly Manufactured Ventilator System, 10 April 2020. Chartered Institute of Ergonomics & Human Factors, Human Factors in the Design and Operation of Ventilators for Covid-19, Last Accessed 1 April 2020. The Guardian, UK missed three chances to join EU scheme to bulk-buy PPE, 13 April 2020. The Guardian, How the UK plans to source 30,000 ventilators for the NHS, 26 March 2020. The Guardian, How close is the NHS to getting the 18,000 ventilators it needs? 14 April 2020. Health Service Journal, NHS needs a third fewer ventilators than forecast, says Hancock, 5 April 2020. Gov.uk, Regulator approves first Ventilator Challenge device, 16 April 2020. The Guardian, UK scraps plans to buy thousands of ventilators from Formula One group, 14 April 2020. Financial Times, Ventilator standards set out for UK makers ‘of no use’ to Covid patients, 15 April 2020. Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, Rapidly Manufactured Ventilator System, 10 April 2020. Financial Times, Ventilator standards set out for UK makers ‘of no use’ to Covid patients, 15 April 2020. Ibid. Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, Rapidly Manufactured CPAP System (RMCPAPS), 29 March 2020.
  5. Content Article
    Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture Nursing Home Survey on Patient Safety Culture Community Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture Ambulatory Surgery Center Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The Surveys on Patient Safety Culture are publicly available for download and use. International users should contact SafetyCultureSurveys@westat.com for permission to use the survey outside of the US.
  6. Content Article
    The WorkSafeMed study combined the assessment of the four topics psychosocial working conditions, leadership, patient safety climate, and occupational safety climate in hospitals. Looking at the four topics provides an overview of where improvements in hospitals may be needed for nurses and physicians. Based on these results, improvements in working conditions, patient safety climate, and occupational safety climate are required for health care professionals in German university hospitals – especially for nurses.
  7. News Article
    All healthcare leaders, providers, patients and the public should wrestle with a fundamental question: How safe is our care? The typical approach has been to measure harm as an indicator of safety, implying that the absence of harm, is equivalent to the presence of safety. But, are we safe, or just lucky? Jim Reinertsen, a past CEO of complex health systems and a leader in healthcare improvement, suggests that past harm does not say how safe you are; rather it says how lucky you have been. After learning about the Measurement and Monitoring of Safety (MMS) Framework, Reinertsen found the answer to his question, “Are we safe or just lucky?” “The Measurement and Monitoring of Safety Framework challenges our assumptions in terms of patient safety,” says Virginia Flintoft, Senior Project Manager, Canadian Patient Safety Institute. “The Framework helps to shift our thinking away from what has happened in the past, to a new lens and language that moves you from the absence of harm to the presence of safety.” Read full story Source: Hospital News, 3 December 2019
  8. Content Article
    The survey measures: workload communication teamwork safety systems learning leadership. The SCS for dental practice teams opened on Thursday 1 August 2019 and will close on Tuesday 31st March 2020.
  9. Content Article
    This framework highlights the following five dimensions, which the authors believe should be included in any safety and monitoring approach in order to give a comprehensive and rounded picture of an organisation’s safety: Past harm: this encompasses both psychological and physical measures Reliability: this is defined as ‘failure free operation over time’ and applies to measures of behaviour, processes and systems Sensitivity to operations: the information and capacity to monitor safety on an hourly or daily basis Anticipation and preparedness: the ability to anticipate, and be prepared for, problems Integration and learning: the ability to respond to, and improve from, safety information.
  10. Community Post
    Interesting blog posted from @Sarahjane Jones on her research findings on staff safety: Do you work in mental health? We'd be interested to hear your own experiences? What challenges do you face?
  11. Content Article
    What can I learn? Chief Nursing Officer safer staffing fellowship programme. Supporting NHS providers: right skills, right staff, right place, right time. Developing workforce safeguards. Safe, sustainable and productive staff in urgent and emergency care. Safe, sustainable and productive staffing for neonatal care and children and young people's services. Safe staffing in learning disability services. Safe, sustainable and productive staffing in maternity services. Safe staffing for adult inpatients in acute care. Safe sustainable and productive staffing: case studies. Update on safe staffing improvement resources for specific care settings.
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