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Found 259 results
  1. News Article
    Hundreds of senior midwives are to be given new training to help improve culture and leadership across 126 NHS trusts. Patient safety minister Nadine Dorries said a new £500,000 maternity leadership programme would be rolled out later this year aimed at giving senior staff running maternity wards the skills and knowledge they need to boost culture and safety. Its one step towards improving the working relationships between midwives and obstetricians and follows the damning report by the Ockenden inquiry into decades of poor care at Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals Trust. The report, published last month, highlighted leadership on maternity wards as a key factor in cases at the trust which led to preventable baby deaths and cases of neglect over many years. Announcing the fund, Nadine Dorries said: “The shocking and tragic findings of the Ockenden Review highlighted the importance of strengthening maternity leadership and oversight as well as fostering more collaborative approaches within maternity and neonatal services. “I’m pleased to announce a new training programme for NHS maternity leaders, which will empower nurses, midwives and obstetricians to get the best out of their teams, and deliver safe, world-class care to mothers and their babies.” Read full story Source: The Independent, 12 January 2021 Government press release
  2. Event
    until
    The uncertainty and anxiety that come with the experience of complexity can be overwhelming. It can be hard to think clearly and act wisely, and our wellbeing can easily suffer. The COVID-19 pandemic has made these experiences an everyday occurrence for many people, and the need for us to work clearly, wisely and healthily has never been more pressing. These Organisational Development workshops from the King's Fund will lift the lid on complexity. Together, you’ll explore how encouraging ourselves and others to understand and acknowledge the loss of control when faced with complexity can help us, our teams and our wider organisational systems survive and even thrive in conditions of uncertainty. The workshops will help you: make sense of the messy reality of complexity, accurately categorise different aspects of that reality and be able to choose appropriate, measured, responses understand your own preferences and strengths in relation to the complexity around you and develop strategies to stretch beyond them help yourself and others be their best during uncertain times. Join one or two sessions, or the whole series. Buy tickets
  3. Event
    The uncertainty and anxiety that come with the experience of complexity can be overwhelming. It can be hard to think clearly and act wisely, and our wellbeing can easily suffer. The COVID-19 pandemic has made these experiences an everyday occurrence for many people, and the need for us to work clearly, wisely and healthily has never been more pressing. These Organisational Development workshops from the King's Fund will lift the lid on complexity. Together, you’ll explore how encouraging ourselves and others to understand and acknowledge the loss of control when faced with complexity can help us, our teams and our wider organisational systems survive and even thrive in conditions of uncertainty. The workshops will help you: make sense of the messy reality of complexity, accurately categorise different aspects of that reality and be able to choose appropriate, measured, responses understand your own preferences and strengths in relation to the complexity around you and develop strategies to stretch beyond them help yourself and others be their best during uncertain times. Join one or two sessions, or the whole series. Buy tickets
  4. Event
    until
    The uncertainty and anxiety that come with the experience of complexity can be overwhelming. It can be hard to think clearly and act wisely, and our wellbeing can easily suffer. The COVID-19 pandemic has made these experiences an everyday occurrence for many people, and the need for us to work clearly, wisely and healthily has never been more pressing. These Organisational Development workshops from the King's Fund will lift the lid on complexity. Together, you’ll explore how encouraging ourselves and others to understand and acknowledge the loss of control when faced with complexity can help us, our teams and our wider organisational systems survive and even thrive in conditions of uncertainty. The workshops will help you: make sense of the messy reality of complexity, accurately categorise different aspects of that reality and be able to choose appropriate, measured, responses understand your own preferences and strengths in relation to the complexity around you and develop strategies to stretch beyond them help yourself and others be their best during uncertain times. Join one or two sessions, or the whole series. Buy tickets
  5. News Article
    Overseas-trained nurses have been told they can join the temporary coronavirus register without undertaking a formal “clinical assessment” in an attempt to bolster the NHS workforce as the third covid wave surges. The Nursing and Midwifery Council confirmed on Tuesday that it has invited the additional nurses in a bid to “strengthen workforce capacity in the immediate period and coming weeks”. It comes as the number of covid inpatient admissions rises sharply across the country, with London and the South East of England badly hit. At the start of the pandemic last year, the NMC asked former nurses who had left within the last three years to join the emergency covid register as cases grew. Unison union’s national nursing officer Stuart Tuckwood believed the move will help deal with “severe” staffing shortages, but warned they must be “supported and supervised” by fully registered nurses to ensure patient safety. Read full story (paywalled) Source: HSJ, 6 January 2021
  6. Event
    This virtual conference, chaired by Mike O’Connell Legal Services Practitioner, and with an opening presentation from Andrew Harris Senior Coroner London Inner South and Professor of Coronial Law William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary’s University London, focuses on the role of the Coroner and preparing and attending Coroner's Inquests. Further information and book your place or email kate@hc-uk.org.uk hub members receive 10% discount. Email info@pslhub.org for code Follow the conversation on Twitter #CoronerRole
  7. Content Article
    We have just come out of a second lockdown. This time my experiences working in the NHS are very different from the first lockdown back in March 2020. As you may have read in my past blogs, the first lockdown wasn’t really a lockdown for me. As a critical care outreach nurse I was going to work as usual; however, the work I was doing had changed. The way we were adapting our environment, our processes was almost exciting – to be able to directly influence rapid change in a usually bureaucratic organisation was novel. I remained at work, there was no furlough, and there was no isolation, no Joe Wicks and no cleaning out my cupboards, unlike some of my non-NHS friends. This time, the second lockdown, things were different for me. I have come away from clinical practice and have entered the world of patient safety management. Not only have I started a new role, I have started it in a new Trust. Moving into a new role in a new Trust during a global pandemic has been challenging to say the least. I had spent the past 24 years in the same Trust, the people around me had seen me grow up – literally. Many of my past colleagues felt like family. It would take me a day to walk round the wards, just once, as every five steps I would meet someone I knew for a chat. I knew who to ask if I had a problem, I knew the nuances of each ward and most importantly, I had tacit knowledge of how work ‘got done’ and how to ‘get it done’. During the first lockdown I spent much of my time on the intensive care unit and the COVID wards. There was great sense of comradery, team work and a support network. Yes, the work was difficult, but we had each other and we were able to openly talk about our fears, shed tears and sometimes laugh about what had happened throughout the shift. In an odd way, it felt comfortable. The second lockdown working for the NHS could not be more different for me. I have changed roles completely. I have been interested in patient safety for a number of years and have done a little quality improvement (QI). Quality improvement in the patient safety space is something that I very much enjoyed as a nurse; however, I found that I didn’t have the time, the headspace or, sometimes, the support to immerse myself into a project that made an impact. It always felt as if I wasn’t doing QI ‘properly’. We were dipping in and out of it, not always following a methodology and grabbing time here and there to write bits up. It often felt we were papering over the cracks and not addressing the bigger problem or tackling multiple problems in a strategic manner. The upside of doing QI clinically is that you can see the impact your change has made in the work that is being done. Working with many of the stakeholders, who you have a close relationship with, you are able to have brief chats with them about the project without the need for formalised meetings. You feel as if you are making a difference to your world and the patient’s experience. Being a quality improvement and patient safety manager seemed the logical next step for me. But I now find myself in an alien world. Weirdly my surroundings are very familiar – I’m working from home. So how do I do QI from my dining room table, in a huge new Trust with people I have never met? It can’t be done. I can’t make any meaningful change in my own house 60 miles away from a hospital I have not worked in… can I? During the beginning of my Darzi fellowship we were ‘taught’ to pay attention to the way we were feeling and the stories we were telling ourselves. The story I was telling myself was not enabling me to be open to the new challenges and opportunities that were awaiting. I remembered being in my comfort zone back in my old role. Yes, I missed that feeling of knowing what I was doing and feeling confident, but I also remembered why I wanted to move. I want to make meaningful differences to the patient experience, safety and to make it easier for staff to do the right thing at the right time. If I was going to move to a new role, I was stepping out of my comfort zone. When stepping out of your comfort zone it will feel uncomfortable at times (most of the time). At the moment I am orbiting the fear zone and trying desperately to break into the learning zone. Although the fear is real, it’s manageable. Slightly odd as it almost feels like excitement too. Image from 'Step outside your comfort zone' Action Coach Learning within a new role is always difficult. You might spend time watching others, taking example from role models, shadowing and asking questions when problems or queries arise… but what can you do when there isn’t anyone to ask, when there is no one to watch, no one to guide you? Skype, MS Teams, Zoom – there are many online tools to help. Interacting with people via a computer is not natural to me. I expect it can’t be natural to anyone? I have come from a role where interacting with people is the main part of the job. Picking up subtle cues from body language, tone of voice and mannerisms count for so much. This is almost impossible to achieve from a computer screen. Striking up a rapport with someone new is a real skill and a skill I prided myself on. The skill I had in reality doesn’t seem to work online. My humour is lost (my jokes were rubbish anyway), time is often limited and conversation is structured around tasks – relationship building comes with time, talking at break times and sharing stories. The team I work with have been amazing. They are there at the end of the phone at any point. I have been supported. But I’m longing to be surrounded by a bustling environment again. Where ideas can be bounced around, projects discussed and problems resolved rather than booking in one-dimensional, online meetings. This won’t be forever, but we are in the midst of working in a different way and finding our feet. As for QI from the dining room table… it can’t be done. I can’t make any meaningful change in my own house 60 miles away from a hospital I have not worked in… can I? Yes you can. You can make a huge difference. My next blog will be how working remotely you can make relationships, influence and introduce change.
  8. News Article
    Staff at a specialist care unit did not attempt to resuscitate a woman with epilepsy, learning difficulties and sleep apnoea when she was found unconscious, an inquest heard. Joanna Bailey, 36, died at Cawston Park in Norfolk on 28 April 2018. Jurors heard she was found by a worker whose CPR training had expired, and the private hospital near Aylsham - which care for adults with complex needs - had been short-staffed that night. Support worker Dan Turco told the coroner's court he went to check on Ms Bailey just after 03:00 BST and found she was not breathing and had blood around her mouth. The inquest heard he went to get help from colleagues, including the nurse in charge, but no-one administered CPR until paramedics arrived. It was heard Mr Turco's CPR training had lapsed in the weeks before Ms Bailey died, unbeknown to him. Mr Turco said he had since received training and has had his first aid qualifications updated. Cawston Park, run by the Jeesal Group, a provider of complex care services within the UK, is currently rated as "requires improvement" by the Care Quality Commission. Read full story Source: BBC News, 23 November 2020
  9. Content Article
    The toolkit explores the three phases of how we normally respond to a crisis; Emergency – at the beginning of a crisis there is high energy. A sense of urgency and a common goal brings teams together and things get done. Regression – our sense of purpose becomes less clear, energy levels drop, people get frustrated and are less productive. Recovery – new goals emerge, and we begin to focus on rebuilding rather than simply surviving. An end, or at least a new sense of normality, is in sight. The aim of this framework is to help people begin to think about how they might move to Recovery. The workshop consists of a 90 minute session that can be delivered online or in person. The toolkit, along with some guidance on how to run it: How to guide Proposal Framework for learning Lesson plan Presentation Action plan For more information or support on using the toolkit please contact paul.gimson@wales.nhs.uk social media @improvementcymru
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