Jump to content

Search the hub

Showing results for tags 'Training'.


More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Start to type the tag you want to use, then select from the list.

  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • All
    • Commissioning, service provision and innovation in health and care
    • Coronavirus (COVID-19)
    • Culture
    • Improving patient safety
    • Investigations, risk management and legal issues
    • Leadership for patient safety
    • Organisations linked to patient safety (UK and beyond)
    • Patient engagement
    • Patient safety in health and care
    • Patient Safety Learning
    • Professionalising patient safety
    • Research, data and insight
    • Miscellaneous

Categories

  • Commissioning, service provision and innovation in health and care
    • Commissioning and funding patient safety
    • Digital health and care service provision
    • Health records and plans
    • Innovation programmes in health and care
  • Coronavirus (COVID-19)
    • Blogs
    • Data, research and statistics
    • Frontline insights during the pandemic
    • Good practice and useful resources
    • Guidance
    • Mental health
    • Exit strategies
    • Patient recovery
  • Culture
    • Bullying and fear
    • Good practice
    • Safety culture programmes
    • Second victim
    • Speak Up Guardians
    • Whistle blowing
  • Improving patient safety
    • Design for safety
    • Disasters averted/near misses
    • Equipment and facilities
    • Human factors (improving human performance in care delivery)
    • Improving systems of care
    • Implementation of improvements
    • Safety stories
    • Stories from the front line
    • Workforce and resources
  • Investigations, risk management and legal issues
    • Investigations and complaints
    • Risk management and legal issues
  • Leadership for patient safety
  • Organisations linked to patient safety (UK and beyond)
  • Patient engagement
  • Patient safety in health and care
  • Patient Safety Learning
  • Professionalising patient safety
  • Research, data and insight
  • Miscellaneous

News

  • News

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start
    End

Last updated

  • Start
    End

Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


First name


Last name


Country


About me


Organisation


Role

Found 191 results
  1. Content Article
    The results found there were 129 unique mentions of barriers to patient safety; these barriers were categorised into five major themes. ‘Limited resources’ was the most prominent theme, followed by barriers related to health systems issues, the medical culture, provider training and patient education/awareness. Although inadequate resources are likely a substantial challenge to the improvement of patient safety in India, other patient safety barriers such as health systems changes, training, and education, could be addressed with fewer resources. While initial approaches to improving patient safety in India and other low- and middle-income countries have focused on implementing processes that represent best practices, this study suggests that multifaceted interventions to also address more structural problems (such as resource constraints, systems issues, and medical culture) may be important.
  2. News Article
    Regulators have uncovered multiple examples of patients being put at risk when junior doctors are left with tasks they are not trained for, lacking support, and facing bullying and inappropriate behaviour. Inspection teams have had to intervene – in some cases contacting senior trust staff – to ensure urgent issues are addressed, after the inspections. Health Education England oversees training nationally, which includes making the checks at trusts which have been put under “enhanced monitoring” by the professional regulator, the General Medical Council, because of concerns from trainees. HSJ has obtained and examined 20 reports, all produced since the beginning of 2019. Themes running through the reports included: Lack of support from consultants. Trainees struggled to contact consultants out of hours. Bullying and inappropriate behaviour was reported at several trusts. Inspectors found a reluctance to report concerns and/or a lack of knowledge of how to do it. Teaching was often of poor quality or cancelled – and sometimes trainees struggled to attend sessions because of how their shifts and rotations were scheduled. Trainees in several trusts reported IT problems, such as being locked out of systems so being unable to access clinical notes and blood tests, and IT systems taking up to 30 minutes to start up, sometimes delaying patient care. Read full story (paywalled) Source: HSJ, 29 June 2020
  3. Content Article
    e-PAIN uniquely distills the knowledge of a range of professionals into 12 Modules made up of interactive sessions to meet the needs of a multidisciplinary audience. e-PAIN is current, up to date and presented in an interactive way to make both basic and specialist knowledge accessible. Any module can be completed stand alone and you can download a certificate upon completion of each module. Sessions take on average 30 minutes to complete and modules have on average 5 sessions. e-PAIN is a collaboration between the Faculty of Pain Medicine, the British Pain Society and e-Learning for Healthcare. It is provided by Health Education England.
  4. Content Article
    The attached report summarises the event. Morning presentations included a keynote address from Professor Coleman, University of Birmingham, and a moving and inspiring presentation from Lisa Richards-Everton, a Patient Safety Campaigner. Delegates then participated in a taster workshop looking at challenges around labelling and used the SIEPS 2.0 model to conduct a systems analysis of the management of a patient’s condition. The afternoon branched into parallel syndicate workshops with the first workshop focusing on training and education around labelling; what challenges needed addressing with training, and how a human factors approach could optimally start to address these training issues. The second workshop looked to identify and discuss challenges around the medicine label and how these could be addressed using a human factors approach. This included looking at some of the issues that exist with current labelling design, before discussing what information is necessary and then providing recommendations for the design from a human factor’s perspective. All syndicate groups gave recommendations for next steps to address these challenges, which were shared at the conclusion of the meeting. Several delegates then volunteered to be involved in a steering team, whose remit would be to address the identified challenges by exploring ways in which these systembased recommendations might be implemented. Recommendations around training perspectives included areas such as education and communication; system redesign, use of technology and recommendations about the design of medical packaging with a human factors approach.
  5. News Article
    Frontline staff and volunteers at the forefront of the national coronavirus response across England will be able to access a new Psychological First Aid (PFA) training course, the Minister for Mental Health Nadine Dorries has announced. The course, which has been developed by Public Health England, will be available to frontline workers and volunteers dealing with the public during the coronavirus pandemic. The free online course enables responders to develop their skills and confidence in providing key psychological support to people affected by coronavirus, including on issues such as job worries, bereavement or isolation as they carry out their vital work as part of the ongoing coronavirus response. It will also help to develop understanding of how emergencies like the coronavirus pandemic can affect us all, how to recognise people who may be at increased risk of distress, and how to offer practical and emotional support. Minister for Mental Health Nadine Dorries said: “Supporting each other’s mental health and wellbeing is more important than ever during these challenging and uncertain times. Staff and volunteers in many different roles are working tirelessly to provide crucial support at this time and are often a critical touchpoint in identifying those who may be affected. “This new training course will help to support the incredible work of frontline workers to support those most in need both through the coronavirus outbreak and beyond, equipping them with vital tools to deliver psychological first aid.” Read press release Source: GOV.UK, 15 June 2020
  6. Content Article
    This qualification is for anyone who wants to carry out incident investigations effectively. Employers, supervisors, SHE champions, union and safety representatives will benefit. Attending the course will enable you to: Independently investigate simple incidents. Gather evidence including conducting witness interviews. Produce an action plan to prevent a recurrence of an incident. Contribute to team investigations for large scale incidents Positively impact the safety culture in your organisation.
  7. Content Article
    Nursing and midwifery professionals are at the heart of responding to COVID-19 today, tomorrow and in the coming weeks ahead. We recognise this is undoubtedly the most challenging, difficult and pressurised time in generations for teams working in health and social care settings across the UK. Interventions to help maintain a balanced and positive mental health will be very important during this crisis. It will also be important to ensure they can also focus on the future. Nightingale Frontline will support nurses and midwives to continue to lead and support the NHS now and be inspired to lead beyond this crisis. It will complement the Health and Wellbeing Service recently launched by NHS England. Nightingale Frontline will provide remote, small group sessions offered to: Executive Directors of Nursing Senior Leaders Ward Managers/Team Leaders Newly Registered Nurses/Midwives Nurses/midwives: Redeployed or Returning to practice following retirement or non-clinical roles Nurses/midwives managing caseloads remotely Windrush and BAME Leaders The leadership support will be facilitated by our expert FNF Associate Facilitators and our senior nurse and midwife alumni network who are highly experienced and skilled in a method of Action Learning known as Co-consulting. This approach combines the benefits of coaching with peer learning in an environment underpinned by psychological safety. Book your free leadership support session. Sessions will be released monthly. If you have any questions, please email: academy@florence-nightingale-foundation.org.uk
  8. Content Article
    For newly qualified practitioners and healthcare professionals on temporary register you will find: Accelerated Preceptorship Guide. Guide for staff supporting during Accelerated Preceptorship. Voice over - Guide for staff supporting NQPs. Support for staff during Accelerated Preceptorship. Voice over - Support for NQPs and other HCPs. Podcast One - general Information.
  9. News Article
    According to an Allego press release, several of the world’s ventilator manufacturers have formed a Ventilator Training Alliance (VTA) and partnered with Allego to create a mobile app that front-line medical providers can use to access a centralised repository of ventilator training resources. Dräger, GE Healthcare, Getinge, Hamilton Medical, Medtronic, Nihon Kohden, and Philips have joined this humanitarian training coalition. The VTA app – powered by learning and readiness platform provider Allego – connects respiratory therapists, nurses and other medical professionals with ventilator training resources from alliance member companies, including instructional how-to videos, manuals, troubleshooting guides, and other ventilator-operation expertise critical to helping responders treat patients suffering from COVID-19-related respiratory distress. Read full story Source: American Association for Respiratory Care, 16 April 2020
×