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Found 34 results
  1. News Article
    UK residents can apply for a Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC) to access emergency medical care in the EU when their current EHIC card runs out. Under a new agreement with the EU, both cards will offer equivalent healthcare protection when people are on holiday, studying or travelling for business. This includes emergency treatment as well as treatment needed for a pre-existing condition. The new GHIC card is free and can be obtained via the official GHIC website. Current European Health Insurance Cards (EHIC) are valid as long as they are in date, and can continue to be used when travelling to the EU. You don't need to apply for a GHIC until your current EHIC expires. People should apply at least two weeks before they plan to travel to ensure their card arrives on time. Read full story Source: BBC News, 11 January 2021
  2. News Article
    A mother fighting for a public inquiry into the death of her son and more than 20 other patients at an NHS mental health hospital in Essex has won a debate in parliament after more than 100,000 people backed her campaign. On Monday, MPs in the House of Commons will debate Melanie Leahy’s petition calling for a public inquiry into the death of her son Matthew in 2012, as well as 24 other patients who died at The Linden Centre, a secure mental health unit in Chelmsford, Essex, since 2000. The centre is run by Essex Partnership University NHS Trust which has been heavily criticised by regulators over the case. A review by the health service ombudsman found 19 serious failings in his care and the NHS response to his mother’s concerns. This included staff changing records after his death to suggest he had a full care plan in place when he didn’t. Matthew was detained under the Mental Health Act but was found hanged in his room seven days later. He had made allegations of being raped at the centre, but this was not taken seriously by staff nor properly investigated by the NHS. The trust has admitted Matthew’s care fell below acceptable standards. In November, it pleaded guilty to health and safety failings linked to 11 deaths of patients in 11 years. Read full story Source: The Independent, 29 November 2020
  3. Content Article
    Elizabeth Dixon was a child with special health needs. She had been born prematurely at Frimley Park Hospital on 14 December 2000. Following treatment and care at Great Ormond Street Hospital and a children’s hospice she was nursed at home under a care package. As a result of a failure to clear a tracheostomy tube she asphyxiated and was pronounced dead at Frimley Park hospital on 4 December 2001. The investigation chaired by Dr Bill Kirkup looked at the events surrounding the care of Elizabeth and makes a series of recommendations in respect of the failures in the care she received from the NHS. Recommendations Hypertension (high blood pressure) in infants is a problem that is under-recognised and inconsistently managed, leading to significant complications. Its profile should be raised with clinicians; there should be a single standard set of charts showing the acceptable range at different ages and gestations; and a single protocol to reduce blood pressure safely. Blood pressure should be incorporated into a single early warning score to alert clinicians to deterioration in children in hospital. Community care for patients with complex conditions or conditions requiring complex care must be properly planned, taking into account and specifying safety, effectiveness and patient experience. The presence of mental or physical disability must not be used to justify or excuse different standards of care. Commissioning of NHS services from private providers should not take for granted the existence of the same systems of clinical governance as are mandated for NHS providers. These must be specified explicitly. Communication between clinicians, particularly when care is handed over from one team or unit to another, must be clear, include all relevant facts and use unambiguous terms. Terms such as palliative care and terminal care may be misleading and should be avoided or clarified. Training in clinical error, reactions to error and responding with honesty, investigation and learning should become part of the core curriculum for clinicians. Although it is true that curricula are already crowded with essential technical and scientific knowledge, it cannot be the case that no room can be found for training in the third leading cause of death in western health systems. Clinical error, openly disclosed, investigated and learned from, must not be subject to blame. Conversely, there should be zero tolerance of cover up, deception and fabrication in any health care setting, not least in the aftermath of error. There should be a clear mechanism to hold individuals to account for giving false information or concealing information relating to public services, and for failing to assist investigations. The Public Authority (Accountability) Bill drawn up in the aftermath of the Hillsborough Independent Panel and Inquests sets out a commendable framework to put this in legislation. It should be re-examined. The existing haphazard system of generating clinical expert witnesses is not fit for purpose. It should be reviewed, taking onto account the clear need for transparent, formalised systems and clinical governance. Professional regulatory and criminal justice systems should contain an inbuilt ‘stop’ mechanism to be activated when an investigation reveals evidence of systematic or organisational failures and which will trigger an appropriate investigation into those wider systemic failures. Scrutiny of deaths should be robust enough to pick up instances of untoward death being passed off as expected. Despite changes to systems for child and adult deaths, concern remains that without independent review such cases may continue to occur. The introduction of medical examiners should be reviewed with a view to making them properly independent. Local health service complaints systems are currently subject to change as part of wider reform of public sector complaints. Implementation of a better system of responding to complaints must be done in such a way as to ensure the integration of complaints into NHS clinical governance as a valuable source of information on safety, effectiveness and patient experience. The approaches available to patients and families who have not been treated with openness and transparency are multiple and complex, and it is easy to embark inadvertently on a path that is ill-suited to deliver the answers that are being sought. There should be clear signposting to help families and the many organisations concerned. Ministerial Statement Anne and Graeme Dixon reaction to Dr Bill Kirkup’s report Patient Safety Learning's statement on the Dixon Inquiry report
  4. Content Article
    Evidence suggests that care, treatment and outcomes of hospital admission are markedly poorer for people with dementia than for those without. Several potential factors may contribute to this, including: pressures of acute care the unique and complex needs of the person with dementia not being recognised organisational systems and processes – acute general hospitals are fast-paced and intense, with a focus on rapid responses, meeting acute needs and achieving discharge as soon as possible. These can lead to a number of risks for people with dementia, including: prolonged stay in hospital increased complications, such as pressure ulcers, falls and delirium increased adverse drug reactions loss of previous abilities and increased levels of dependence incidents of incontinence that can become permanent decline in cognitive function an increased likelihood of admission to a care home increased morbidity and mortality.
  5. Content Article
    The aim of the audit was to assess the standard of care provided to patients with lower leg ulceration and to understand who provides care and where this care is provided. The specific objectives within the audit were: To ascertain the number of people presenting with lower leg ulceration. To assess the standard of care provided to people with lower leg ulceration. To assess the provision and uptake of training amongst health care professionals. To determine if health and social care trusts have policies and documentation in place for the treatment of lower leg ulceration. To provide information to assist in establishing regional best practice guideline and care standards for the delivery of lower leg ulceration in Northern Ireland.
  6. Community Post
    Hi All, I was looking through a recent coroners case ( https://www.judiciary.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Julie-Taylor-2019-0454.pdf ) Where a learning disability patient deteriorated while in an acute care setting. One of the recommendations was that the Trust should have used a 'reasonable adjustment care plan'. I haven't heard or seen one of these before. So I had a quick look on the internet and found this. http://www.bristol.ac.uk/sps/media/cipold_presentations/workshop3presentation1-linda-swann.pdf Does anyone else use a care plan that they wouldn't mind sharing? Thanks - Claire
  7. Content Article
    Key outcomes UTI hospital admissions reduced by 36% in the four pilot care homes (150 residents). UTIs requiring antibiotics reduced by 58%. The gap between UTIs increased from an average of nine days in the baseline period to 80 days in the implementation and sustainability phase. One residential home was UTI-free for 243 consecutive days. Similar outcomes noted in pilot 2 care homes (215 residents).
  8. Content Article
    What will I learn? History of sepsis guidance Oxford AHSN approach to implementation of the guidance Care bundles (resource) Regional pathway for sepsis How to measure surveillance Limitations of coding sepsis Patient outcomes
  9. News Article
    Palliative care doctors are urging people to have a conversation about what they would want if they, or their loved ones, became seriously unwell with coronavirus. We should discuss all possible scenarios - even those we are not "comfortable to talk about", they said. Medics said the virus underlined the importance of these conversations. New guidelines are being produced for palliative care for Covid-19 patients, the BBC understands. Read full story Source: BBC News, 21 March 2020
  10. Content Article
    The high complexity model is intended for services that have more complex pathways e.g. chronic (more than one year) services in acute, mental health or community services, where patients may return for several follow up appointments at intervals which may change depending on how their condition progresses. You can use this model to inform decision making and planning, in supporting delivery of timely care to patients. This web page includes the following tools: high complexity model user guidance demand and capacity: high complexity model (blank) demand and capacity: high complexity model (populated).
  11. Content Article
    This booklet is for patients to download and use. It includes: My basic information Things you must know about me Things that are important to me My likes and dislikes This passport can be taken into any healthcare setting.
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