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Found 61 results
  1. News Article
    Senior NHS staff have been advised by the Welsh government to discharge people who are well enough to leave, even without a package of care. But one GP called the announcement "terrifying" and warned that patients could deteriorate and end up back in hospital. The seven health boards in Wales have nearly 1,800 patients medically well enough to leave hospital. The Welsh government has called the NHS situation "unprecedented". The message comes after one health leader said the NHS was on a "knife-edge" in terms of its ability to cope. The letter from the chief nursing officer and the deputy chief medical officer to the health boards offered "support and advice to ensure patients are kept as safe as possible, and services are kept as effective as possible over the next period". Read full story Source; BBC News, 4 January 2023
  2. Content Article
    Coroner's concerns Asher was entirely dependent upon a complex package of care as a highly vulnerable ventilator dependent child. Evidence at inquest was that on numerous occasions he was not provided with the prescribed 2:1 care. The care package, despite being described as one of the most complex and most expensive was not appropriately reviewed and there was no mandatory system of quality checks or formal review when there was a significant change in family circumstances. Quarterly reviews were not carried out without explanation. The primary responsibility fell upon the family members, namely Asher’s parents, who were also responsible for other children in the family and employed as teachers. Concerns raised by the parents were not taken for discussion to case conference or professional’s meetings and essentially not followed up at all, leaving the situation in the house dangerous with an ultimately calamitous outcome. There was a lack of scrutiny or reconciliation of Asher’s care package, which could have identified gaps that needed to be addressed. Training for the staff involved was unclear to the court and seemingly not in place or inadequate. A high turnover of staff was cited as one of the reasons, but this should have highlighted a need for increased training and scrutiny. The court was advised that new structures would be in place by July 2022. The production of this report therefore has been delayed to give the opportunity for those systems to be in place and reported to the court.
  3. News Article
    A coroner has raised concerns about a mental heath trust where staff falsified records made on the night a man died. Eliot Harris, 48, died in the Northgate Hospital in Great Yarmouth, run by the Norfolk and Suffolk Foundation Trust (NSFT), in April 2020. Norfolk coroner Jacqueline Lake said that, two years on, staff were still not recording observations properly. The 48-year-old, who had schizophrenia, had been sectioned under the Mental Health Act after he became agitated at his care home and refused to take medication. He was taken to Northgate Hospital and, after a period in a seclusion room, was transferred to a private room on the ward. Mr Harris was discovered unresponsive in bed during the early hours of 10 April and pronounced dead half an hour later. In a Prevention of Future Deaths Report (PFDR), Ms Lake said: "Quality audits undertaken following Eliot Harris's death, show that observations are still not being carried out and recorded in accordance with NSFT's most recent policy - more than two years following Eliot's death." She said that on the night Mr Harris died there was no nurse in charge and instead of being allocated specific tasks, staff were told to "muck in", causing confusion about job responsibilities. These issues were not resolved at the time of the inquest, she said, with no evidence provided about whether specific tasks were allocated on the night shift. Not all staff had been trained in recording observations, there was a lack of evidence about procedures for entering a patient's room over concerns for their welfare, and there was "still some way to go to make sure care plans are completed", Ms Lake said. Read full story Source: BBC News, 6 October 2022
  4. Content Article
    Coroner's concerns Substantial evidence was heard at the inquest with regard to observations which were not carried out in respect of Eliot Harris in accordance with NSFT’s Policy and with regard to staff not undergoing training and assessment of their competency to carry out observations correctly. Quality audits undertaken following Eliot Harris’s death, show that observations are still not being carried out and recorded in accordance with NSFT’s most recent policy – more than two years following Eliot’s death. Not all staff have completed training with regard to carrying out of observations or have undergone and assessment of their competency to carry out observations. On the night of Eliot’s death, a Nurse in Charge had not been allocated and members of staff were not allocated specific tasks – they were told to “muck in”, as a result there was some confusion as to who was responsible for specific jobs. The evidence at the inquest was not clear as to whether specific tasks are allocated to specific members of staff on Night Duty and whether and how a Nurse in Charge is appointed for each night’s rota. Multi Team Meetings were not fully and properly recorded in the clinical records. At the inquest, evidence was heard there “is still some way to go” with regard to improving record keeping and for ensuring important matters such as rationale for decisions is fully recorded. Eliot’s Care Plan was not up to date at the time of his death. At the inquest evidence was heard that although audits show there has been an improvement in completion of Care Plans, there “is still some way to go” and staff still need to be prompted to complete these. Staff were reluctant to enter Eliot’s room following concern for his wellbeing. The evidence did not reveal what is now in place to ensure staff enter a patient’s room immediately if there are concerns for a patient’s welfare (having considered their (staff’s) own safety). It is not clear from the evidence what is now in place to ensure that relevant and requested physical health checks are carried out. The process of ensuring health checks are carried out has not changed since Eliot’s death and remains a retrospective process.
  5. News Article
    A new report by the Stroke Association released today warns that, if the thrombectomy rate stays at 2020/21 levels, 47,112 stroke patients in England would miss out on the game changing acute stroke treatment, mechanical thrombectomy, over the length of the newly revised NHS Long Term Plan. This year, NHS England missed its original target to make mechanical thrombectomy available to all patients for whom it would benefit – only delivering to 28% of all suitable patients by December 20212. The Stroke Association’s ‘Saving Brains’ report calls for a 24/7 thrombectomy service, which could cost up to £400 million. But treating all suitable strokes with thrombectomy would save the NHS £73 million per year. Stroke professionals quoted in the report cite insufficient bi-plane suites, containing radiology equipment, as a barrier to a 24/7 service. The Stroke Association is calling for: The Treasury to provide urgent funding for thrombectomy in the Autumn Budget 2022, for infrastructure, equipment, workforce training and support, targeting both thrombectomy centres and referring stroke units. Department of Health and Social Care to develop a sustainable workforce plan to fill the gaps in qualified staff. NHS England to address challenges in transfer to and between hospitals in its upcoming Urgent & Emergency Care Plan. Putting innovation - such as artificial intelligence (AI) imaging software and video triage in ambulances - into practice. Juliet Bouverie, Chief Executive of the Stroke Association said: “Thrombectomy is a miracle treatment that pulls patients back from near-death and alleviates the worst effects of stroke. It’s shocking that so many patients are missing out and being saddled with unnecessary disability. Plus, the lack of understanding from government, the NHS and local health leaders about the brain saving potential thrombectomy is putting lives at risk. There are hard-working clinicians across the stroke pathway facing an uphill struggle to provide this treatment and it’s time they got the support they need to make this happen. It really is simple. Thrombectomy saves brains, saves money and changes lives; now is the time for real action, so that nobody has to live with avoidable disability ever again." Read full story Source: The Stroke Association, 28 July 2022
  6. News Article
    Hospital passports need to be more consistently used across the NHS to better support patients with communication difficulties, a learning disability nurse says. Support for patients with communication needs and learning disabilities, as well as the nurses caring for them, is often ‘inconsistent’, according to RCN professional lead for learning disabilities Jonathan Beebee. Coupled with the current system-wide pressure of patient backlogs and high staff vacancy rates it means patients often do not have their communication needs met. A hospital passport, which contains vital information about a patient’s health condition, learning disability and communication needs, would help address this, Mr Beebee told Nursing Standard. "There has got to be better consistency in how we are identifying people with communication needs, how they are getting flagged and how nurses are being pointed to that from the second that someone is admitted to the ward," he said. Mr Beebee says ensuring a standardised approach would improve patient experience and ultimately nurses’ relationship with patients. Read full story Source: Nursing Standard, 27 July 2022
  7. News Article
    Roy Cairns, 58, was diagnosed with liver cancer in 2019. Twelve months later a tumour was found on his lung. Mr Cairns said taking part in the cancer prehab programme piloted by the Northern Ireland's South Eastern Health Trust after his second diagnosis was a "win-win", not only for himself but also his surgeons. "I think when you get that diagnosis you are left floundering and with prehab the support you get gives you focus and a little bit of control back in your life," he said. Prehabilitation (prehab) means getting ready for cancer treatment in whatever time you have before it starts. Mr Cairns is one of 175 patients referred to the programme which involves the Belfast City Council and Macmillan Cancer Support. Dr Cherith Semple said the point of the programme is to " improve people's physical well-being as much as possible before treatment and to offer emotional support at a time that can be traumatic". Dr Semple, who is a leader in clinical cancer nursing, said this new approach to getting patients fit prior to their surgery was proving a success, both in the short and long-term. She said: "We know that it can reduce a patient's hospital stay post-surgery and it can reduce your return to hospital with complications directly afterwards." Read full story Source: BBC News, 20 July 2022
  8. News Article
    An 80-year-old woman with coeliac disease died within days of being fed Weetabix in hospital, an inquest has heard. Hazel Pearson, from Connah’s Quay in Flintshire, was being treated at Wrexham Maelor hospital and died four days later on 30 November from aspiration pneumonia. Although her condition was recorded on her admission documents, there was no sign beside her bed to alert healthcare assistants to her dietary requirements. Coeliac disease is a condition where the immune system attacks the body’s own tissues after consuming gluten, a type of protein found in wheat, rye and barley, causing damage to the small intestine. The hospital’s action plan to avoid similar fatal incidents lacked detail and had “narrow vision”, the coroner said. The hospital’s matron, Jackie Evans, told the inquest that changes, including placing signs above the beds of patients with special dietary requirements, had been implemented since Pearson’s death. But Sutherland raised concerns that the hospital had yet to carry out a formal investigation into what went wrong. She said: “The action plan lacks detail. What has happened locally is commendable, but it lacks detail and it has narrow vision.” She added that the plan that had been put in place was “amateurish with no strategic vision”. The assistant coroner said she would be unable to make a decision on a prevention of future deaths report until the Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board (BCUHB) provided a witness to answer further questions about changes. Read full story Source: The Guardian, 17 June 2022
  9. Event
    This conference will provide a practical guide to delivering an effective prehabilitation programme, ensuring patients are fit for cancer surgery or treatment. This is even more important in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdowns which have had a negative effect on many individual’s health and fitness levels. The conference will look at optimisation of patients fitness and wellbeing through exercise, nutrition and psychological support. Register
  10. Content Article
    The aim of the audit was to assess the standard of care provided to patients with lower leg ulceration and to understand who provides care and where this care is provided. The specific objectives within the audit were: To ascertain the number of people presenting with lower leg ulceration. To assess the standard of care provided to people with lower leg ulceration. To assess the provision and uptake of training amongst health care professionals. To determine if health and social care trusts have policies and documentation in place for the treatment of lower leg ulceration. To provide information to assist in establishing regional best practice guideline and care standards for the delivery of lower leg ulceration in Northern Ireland.
  11. Content Article
    The high complexity model is intended for services that have more complex pathways e.g. chronic (more than one year) services in acute, mental health or community services, where patients may return for several follow up appointments at intervals which may change depending on how their condition progresses. You can use this model to inform decision making and planning, in supporting delivery of timely care to patients. This web page includes the following tools: high complexity model user guidance demand and capacity: high complexity model (blank) demand and capacity: high complexity model (populated).
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