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Found 14 results
  1. Content Article
    C-Diff Dentures in the healthcare setting Discharge instructions Drug allergies End of life care Falls at home Getting the right diagnosis Handwashing Hospital ratings Influenza (the flu) Latex allergies Medical records Medication safety at home Medication safety: Hospital and doctor's office Metric-based patient weights MRI safety MRSA Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) Norovirus (stomach flu) Obstructive sleep apneoa Pneumonia Pressure injuries (bed sores) Sepsis What is an MRI? Wrong-site surgery
  2. Content Article
    This article from the Natasha Allergy Research Foundation (NARF) notes that the updated guidance came in response to the inquest into Shante Turay-Thomas, who died in north London just 18 years old, from anaphylaxis after eating hazelnut. The Coroner found that she had not been properly advised that the reason for carrying two AAIs was that in the event of a severe food allergy. A second dose of adrenaline can be a life preserving measure whilst waiting for emergency medical treatment. The coroner warned that action is needed to ensure that people with severe food allergies are aware that two AAIs must be carried at all times and they must be properly trained in how to use them. This would help to prevent further, avoidable deaths from severe food allergies. Follow the link below to read the full article from NARF. The full updated NICE guidance is also attached below.
  3. News Article
    A teenager with a severe nut allergy died in part because of human error, a coroner has ruled. Shante Turay-Thomas, 18, had a severe reaction to eating a hazelnut. The inquest heard a series of failures meant that an ambulance took more than 40 minutes to arrive at her home in Wood Green, north London. Her mother Emma Turay, who said she felt "badly let down" by the NHS, wants an "allergy tsar" to be appointed to help prevent similar deaths. The inquest heard call staff for the NHS's 111 non-emergency number failed to appreciate the teenager's worsening condition was typical of a severe allergic reaction to nuts. A telephone recording of the 111 call, made by her mother, at 23:01 BST on Friday 14 September 2018, revealed how the 18-year-old could be heard in the background struggling to breathe. "My chest hurts, my throat is closing and I feel like I'm going to pass out," she said before asking her mother to check how long the ambulance would be, then adding: "I'm going to die." The inquest heard Ms Turay-Thomas had tried to use her auto-injector adrenaline pen, however it later emerged she had only injected a 300 microgram dose, rather than the 1,000 micrograms needed to stabilise her condition. It also emerged she was unaware of the need to use two shots for the most serious allergic reactions and had not received medical training after changing her medication delivery system from the EpiPen to a new Emerade device. The inquest at St Pancras Coroner's Court was told an ambulance that was on its way to the patient had been rerouted because the call was incorrectly categorised as requiring only a category two response, rather than the more serious category one. Read full story Source: BBC News, 13 January 2020
  4. News Article
    One of the main brands of adrenaline auto-injector pen, which can save lives during serious allergy attacks, is being recalled in the UK after the death of a teenager whose family say the product failed. Shante Turay-Thomas, 18, died in September last year after it is claimed that her adrenaline pen did not work although she tried it twice. She told her mother, “I’m going to die,” as she succumbed to an allergic reaction to hazelnuts. Her death was the subject of an inquest hearing last month, which resumes this week. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) confirmed this weekend that all batches of Emerade auto-injector had been recalled from pharmacies after an error was identified that can cause some pens to fail to activate. Between July and November, the agency said it had been made aware of 16 suspected activation failures. The agency said it was aware of two fatalities of patients reported to have used the pens but the fault had not been confirmed as a contributor to the deaths. Read full story Source: The Times, 8 December 2019
  5. Content Article
    This page is dedicated to the Anaphylaxis Campaigns (AC), Making Schools Safer Project and includes all the resources that they have produced for schools; from allergy awareness presentations (for pupils) to free online e-learning AllergyWise courses.
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