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Found 98 results
  1. Event
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    Patient Safety: Embracing technology in a rapidly evolving healthcare environment to reduce medication errors. In England 237 million mistakes occur at some point in the medication process. By embracing technology that already exists, we may actually hold the key to being able to significantly reduce this figure. Join Andrea Jenkyns MP, pharmacy and nursing thought leaders and patient safety representatives for an interactive discussion on embracing technology to reduce medication errors. The timing of this event is particularly significant as World Patient Safety Day takes place the following day and so these issues should be at the forefront of policy makers minds. Confirmed panelists include: Prof. Liz Kay, Former Director of Pharmacy at Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust Heather Randle, Lead for Medication Management at Royal College of Nursing Clive Flashman, Chief Digital Officer at Patient Safety Learning Ed Platt, Automation Director, Omnicell Registration
  2. Event
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    Unprecedented levels of change have taken place in the design, service and delivery of health care services in the space of months. COVID-19 has upended our understanding of good, quality care, with many barriers removed instantly and new ideas deemed too radical a couple of months ago, becoming our ‘new normal’. This new reality, with the essential limitations on physical contact has resulted in digital solutions taking centre stage in tackling the pandemic, providing care and ensuring continuity of care for patients across the country. In this event, we will examine the insights our current reality teaches us about how we have delivered digital health in the past. Were some of the barriers safeguards of quality standards and patient safety benchmarks? Are there reasons to be worried about the speed of transformation? And how can we ensure that we keep the good changes and mitigate the negative? Join The King's Fund free online event to discuss: what an inclusive, person-centred digital revolution would look like for the NHS and social care the standards from before the pandemic and what the gains from this rapid transformation should consolidate what this transformation will mean for people and staff on the ground. Further information and registration
  3. Event
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    COVID-19 has transformed the delivery of health care services, bringing about unprecedented change in very little time. Changes that were thought to require years of careful planning happened in many cases overnight, with technology proving to be a key factor in supporting patients and staff in the delivery of care. In this four-day event, the King's Fund are bringing together top experts from the NHS and other parts of the digital health system to discuss the lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic. From the benefits of emergency data gathering in order to work on new treatments, to the transfer of primary care services online, COVID-19 has been the catalyst bringing about the long-discussed digital revolution. With almost every part of the system shaken by Covid-19, was all digital change positive and what are the challenges still left to tackle? Join to hear the views of NHS and industry leaders who played a central role in bringing about the new digital reality for health care. It will explore how they managed to adapt to the pressing needs of the pandemic, which cutting-edge innovative solutions they wish to retain as the system returns to ‘normal’ and what problems this speedy digital transformation has created. View programme and register
  4. Event
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    This webinar will explore virtual care and the use of patient health data through remote patient monitoring. In the UK and US alike, COVID-19 has accelerated the dramatic shift towards utilising digital health services and tools to virtually connect with and care for patients. Remote patient monitoring (RPM) offers providers the opportunity to remotely collect and utilise patients’ personal health data, such as data from their home-use medical devices and wearables, within care delivery efforts. These personal health data are providing deeper insight into patients’ physiologic health metrics, lifestyle decisions and behavioural trends while replacing the clinical data previously collected in-person. As health care organisations need to quickly scale virtual care to thousands of patients, clear best practices and lessons learned have emerged. This episode will deep-dive into the successful operations of the largest, centralised RPM programme, supporting over 3000 clinicians and more than 50,000 enrolled patients. We’ll delve into the most basic and complex challenges around patient-generated health data, patient consent, enrollment workflows, device logistics, patient and provider engagement, and more. This webinar will explore: Core operations and technologies to a holistic virtual care strategy The clinical outcomes, patient and provider satisfaction, and efficiencies created with RPM Best practices in digital health operations, data integration, analytics, and engagement A model and framework for scaling virtual care and RPM to thousands of patients quickly A CPD certificate with 1 CPD credit will be issued to those joining the webinar live as well as those who watch the recording afterwards. Certificates will be issued 7 days after the webinar to those who watch it live and after 30 days for those that watch the recording. Join in the conversation online using #RSMDigiHealthBook hereFollow us on Twitter: @RoySocMed Book here
  5. Content Article
    The case studies illustrate the potential of digital technology to transform care, particularly through empowering patients, supporting stronger therapeutic relationships and effective teamworking across professional boundaries, and creating networks and communities to support patients. The paper also calls on health care providers to assess the impact on staff and patients of the rapid transition to online services driven by the COVID-19 pandemic. Has the impact of the changes been fully assessed? And, in light of these case studies, is there scope to be more ambitious in redesigning services?
  6. News Article
    In the largest independent randomized controlled trial (RCT) of its type, a multimodal digital therapy program for patients with non-specific chronic low back pain has outperformed standard-of-care treatment across all medical outcomes. Results of the study, published in the Journal of Pain Research, show that patients using Kaia, the back pain management app developed by leading digital therapeutics company Kaia Health, reduced pain levels, anxiety, depression, stress, and improved wellbeing and body functionality significantly more compared to standard-of-care treatments, e.g. pain killers, surgeries, physical therapy. “This large-scale study demonstrates the significant benefits for people managing low back pain when using Kaia to deliver a multimodal treatment through a digital device, such as a smartphone,” says Thomas R. Toelle, M.D., Ph.D., Head of the Pain Center of the Technical University Munich, Germany. “These results add to the growing body of medical evidence that supports the use of digital multimodal treatments for chronic conditions, such as back pain.” Low back pain is one of the leading causes of global disability, with an enormous cost for healthcare systems worldwide. 1,2 According to a 2018 report on the impact of musculoskeletal pain on employers, chronic pain, including back pain, accounts for 188.7 million lost work days, and $62,4 billion in lost productivity cost.3 Kaia is an app-based, multimodal digital therapy program for chronic back pain, which focuses on Physical therapy, Relaxation exercises, and Medical education.
  7. Content Article
    Among the results reported by the Scan4Safety demonstrator sites, were: the release of 140,000 hours of clinical time back to patient care non-recurrent inventory reductions of £9m recurrent inventory savings worth nearly £5m across the six trusts.
  8. News Article
    A new report has highlighted how point-of-care scanning in the NHS can help to improve patient safety, saving the NHS millions of pounds. Six NHS hospital trusts which implemented regular point-of-care scanning have ensured complete traceability of healthcare items to help improve patient safety while securing millions of pounds of savings and releasing thousands of hours of clinical time, a new report reveals. ‘A scan of the benefits: the Scan4Safety evidence report’ details the results at hospital trusts that took part in a national two-year programme, known as Scan4Safety, to investigate the benefits of point-of-care barcode scanning in the NHS. Full article here We wonder if @Richard Price might like to post more about what the impact of Scan4safety has been at University Hospitals Plymouth. Perhaps here: https://www.pslhub.org/learn/commissioning-service-provision-and-innovation-in-health-and-care/digital-health-and-care-service-provision/other-health-and-care-software/
  9. Event
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    In this extended episode, our panel will describe the Care Information Exchange, a patient portal that facilitates the sharing of healthcare records across NW London. This system currently holds the records for over 1.6 million patients and allows patients, hospitals, GP practices and social care organisations to effectively share records for a population of 2.4 million. They will also describe how the frailty team in the Trust have used the portal with remote patient monitoring technology to redesign a care pathway for lung conditions, post-COVID. They will discuss the resulting improvements in patient care, especially in detecting deterioration during hospital stays and afterwards in the community, and the economic benefits that have accrued through the use of patient-generated data. A CPD certificate with 1 CPD credit will be issued to those joining the webinar live as well as those who watch the recording afterwards. Certificates will be issued 7 days after the webinar to those who watch it live and after 30 days for those that watch the recording. Book here Join in the conversation online using #RSMDigiHealthFollow us on Twitter: @RoySocMed
  10. News Article
    GP systems will now be updated in 'near-real time' to reveal the result of Covid-19 tests taken by all of their patients. GPs will not need to act on the information, which will be visible on systems whether the patient tested positive or negative. This will apply to all patients where it has been possible to identify the patient's NHS number, NHS Digital said. EMIS Health chief medical officer Shaun O’Hanlon said: "Technology has played a pivotal role in the response to COVID-19 across the board and keeping the medical record up to date with COVID-19 test results means everyone who can share that record has a full picture of the patient’s health, including the patient themselves via Patient Access." "This will not only help day to day patient care, and it will also help on a wider population health level, as data-led insight relies on full and complete medical records as analysts continue to research COVID-19 and its short- and long-term impact on the nation." Read full story Source: Pulse, 20 July 2020
  11. Content Article
    You may also like to watch: 2-minute Tuesdays: Guidance in a time of flux
  12. News Article
    Singapore plans to open source a smartphone app its digital government team has developed to track citizens' encounters with coronavirus carriers. The app, named TraceTogether, and its government is urging citizens to run so that if they encounter a Coronavirus carrier, it’s easier to trace who else may have been exposed to the virus. With that info in hand, health authorities are better-informed about who needs to go into quarantine and can focus their resources on those who most need assistance. The app is opt-in and doesn’t track users through space, instead recording who you have encountered. To do so, it requires Bluetooth and location services to be turned on when another phone running the app comes into range exchanges four nuggets of information - a timestamp, Bluetooth signal strength, the phone’s model, and a temporary identifier or device nickname. While location services are required, the app doesn't track users, instead helping to calculate distances between them. Read full story Source: The Register, 26 March 2020
  13. News Article
    NHSX is working on a contact tracking app to trace the spread of coronavirus through the population. Contact tracking is already in limited use for people who have tested positive and the discipline has a long history in tuberculosis outbreaks. In a statement sent to HSJ, Matthew Gould, Chief Executive of NHSX, said : “NHSX are looking at whether app-based solutions might be helpful in tracking and managing coronavirus, and we have assembled expertise from inside and outside the organisation to do this as rapidly as possible.” Read full story (paywalled) Source: HSJ, 18 March 2020
  14. News Article
    Babylon Health is investigating whether NHS patients were among those affected by a 'software error' that allowed people registered with its private GP service to view recordings of other people's consultations earlier this month. Babylon Health has confirmed that a small number of patients were able to view recordings of other patients' consultations earlier this week. The issue came to light after a patient in Leeds who had access to the Babylon app through a private health insurance plan with Bupa reported that he had been able to view around 50 consultations that were not his own. The patient told the BBC he was 'shocked' to discover the data breach. "You don't expect to see anything like that when you're using a trusted app," he said. "It's shocking to see such a monumental error has been made." Babylon told GPonline that the app used by private and NHS patients is the same, but it had yet to confirm whether the roughly 80,000 patients registered with the company's digital first NHS service GP at Hand were among those affected. The problem is understood to have cropped up when a new feature was introduced for patients who switched from audio to video mid-way through a consultation. Read full story Source: GPOnline, 10 June 2020
  15. Content Article
    This webinar will be of interest to: anyone currently working in a nursing/allied health professionals (AHP) clinical informatics role those who aspire to develop their career in this area those who are seeking to set up such a role within their organisation those currently working with CNIOs/AHP informatics leads. Attendees will learn: more about how CNIO/AHP informatics roles are currently set up in the NHS – time commitment, reporting structures etc what the profile is of those holding such roles about possible challenges in connections between CNIOs/AHPs in informatics roles and CCIOs and CIOs thoughts on whether the CNIO/AHP informatics role should be formally recognised further views from senior leaders on the future of these roles.
  16. News Article
    DigitalHealth.London is helping health and care professionals turn the idea of digital innovation into tangible improvements in experience and outcomes for patients. Our work is instrumental in giving health and care stakeholders across London insight into the best digital health interventions and tools on the market. DigitalHealth.London is a collaborative programme delivered by MedCity, and London’s three Academic Health Science Networks – UCLPartners, Imperial College Health Partners, and the Health Innovation Network. Closing date: Midnight, Sunday 5 July 2020 Read more
  17. News Article
    With all care home staff and residents now eligible for testing, with a priority given to those in homes looking after residents over 65 years of age, a new online portal has been launched to streamline the process of arranging coronavirus test kit deliveries. As national testing capacity continues to increase, the government is prioritising testing for care homes and other areas identified as having the greatest need. As such, across England, all symptomatic and asymptomatic care home staff and residents can be tested for coronavirus. The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) is working alongside local authority Directors of Public Health, Directors of Adult Social Services and local NHS providers to deliver this testing programme for care homes. Tens of thousands of care home workers and residents have already been tested, either by Public Health England or at drive through testing sites, mobile testing units and via satellite testing kits – packages of tests sent to care homes for staff to use on residents. Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Matt Hancock said: “The additional testing capacity we have achieved delivers many thousands of tests a day for residents and staff in care homes. This new portal allows those who book tests for staff and residents to do so even more easily, and it also offers a route for the prioritisation of care homes with the greatest need." Read full story Source: National Health Executive, 12 May 2020
  18. News Article
    Tens of thousands of outpatient video consultations have been carried out by NHS trusts following the national rollout of a digital platform to support the coronavirus response. Digital healthcare service Attend Anywhere was introduced across the country at the end of March after NHSX chief clinical information officer Simon Eccles called for its rapid expansion. There has been a major push to boost digital healthcare services across the country in order to support the national response to coronavirus. Much of primary care has already switched to working virtually. Undertaking hospital outpatient appointments digitally has been identified as a way of keeping patients safe by removing their need to travel. There have now been more than 79,000 consultations with Attend Anywhere. The number of consultations started at around 200 per day, but has rapidly increased to more than 6,000 per day. Data released by NHS Digital showed that GPs moved swiftly to change their practice model in the face of COVID-19. The proportion of appointments conducted face-to-face nearly halved and the proportion of telephone appointments increased by over 600 per cent from 1 March to 31 March as GPs moved to keep patients out of surgeries except when absolutely necessary. However, concerns have been raised over the limitation of remote appointments, particularly in mental health services. Royal College of GPs chair Martin Marshall raised concerns that video appointments could make it difficult for doctors to diagnose and manage patients’ conditions during the pandemic. Read full story Source: HSJ, 11 May 2020
  19. News Article
    An overflow system has been added to NHS 111 to help deal with the “huge increase” in calls during the coronavirus pandemic. People displaying coronavirus symptoms who are contacting 111 either via telephone or online are now being diverted to the overspill system, freeing up space for non-covid related enquiries. The tool has been developed by software company Advanced — alongside NHSX, NHS England and NHS Improvement — for its patient management system Adastra, which is used by 80% of NHS 111 providers in England. The overspill add on, which started being rolled out earlier this month, can be accessed by clinicians who are working from home, including those who have been redeployed in the NHS, as well as those in 111 call centres. Ric Thompson, managing director of health and care at Advanced, said the new queuing extension was developed to handle the “huge increase in the number of calls to 111 but also the need to bring back many thousands of retired clinicians”. Read full story Source: HSJ, 29 April 2020
  20. News Article
    GPs will now be able to access records for patients registered at other practices during the coronavirus epidemic in a major relaxation of current rules. The move will allow appointments to be shared across practices, and NHS 111 staff will also have access to records to let them book direct appointments for patients at any GP practice or specialist centre. The change in policy has been initiated by NHS Digital and NHSX to enable swift and secure sharing of patient records across primary care during the covid-19 pandemic. It means that the GP Connect1 system, currently used by some practices to share records on a voluntary basis, will be switched on at all practices until the pandemic is over. In addition, extra information including significant medical history, reason for medication, and immunisations will be added to patients’ summary care records and made available to a wider group of healthcare professionals. Usually, individuals must opt in but following the changes only people who have opted out will be excluded. Read full story Source: The BMJ, 27 April 2020
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