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Found 135 results
  1. Content Article
    Key messages The report calls for: All public services to become trauma- and agenda-informed. NICE to incorporate trauma-informed principles into guidance. Service commissioners to adopt trauma-informed principles. All inspectorate bodies to incorporate trauma-informed principles. Government to lead the way in putting these principles into practice.
  2. News Article
    The NHS is spending millions of pounds encouraging patients to give feedback but the information gained is not being used effectively to improve services, experts have warned. Widespread collection of patient comments is often “disjointed and standalone” from efforts to improve the quality of care, according to a study by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). Nine separate studies of how hospitals collect and use feedback were analysed. They showed that while thousands of patients give hospitals their comments, their reports are often reduced to simple numbers – and in many cases, the NHS lacks the ability to analyse and act on the results. The research found the NHS had a “managerial focus on bad experiences” meaning positive comments on what went well were “overlooked”. The NIHR report said: “A lot of resource and energy goes into collecting feedback data but less into analysing it in ways that can lead to change, or into sharing the feedback with staff who see patients on a day-to-day basis. NHS England's chief nurse, Ruth May, said: "Listening to patient experience is key to understanding our NHS and there is more that that we can hear to improve it. This research gives insight into how data can be analysed and used by frontline staff to make changes that patients tell us are needed." Read full story Source: 13 January 2020
  3. Community Post
    I am interested in what colleagues here think about the proposed patient safety specialist role? https://improvement.nhs.uk/resources/introducing-patient-safety-specialists/ https://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/nhs-patient-safety-hospitals-mistakes-harm-a9259486.html Can this development make a difference? Or will it lead to safety becoming one person's responsibility and / or more of the same as these responsibilities will be added to list of duties of already busy staff? Can these specialist be a driver for culture change including embedding a just culture and a focus on safety-II and human factors? What support do trusts and specialists need for this to happen? Some interesting thoughts on this here: https://twitter.com/TerryFairbanks/status/1210357924104736768
  4. News Article
    Hospitals will be required to employ patient safety specialists from next April as part of efforts by the health service to reduce thousands of avoidable errors every year. NHS trusts will be told to identify staff who will be designated as the safety specialist for each organisation. These workers, who will get specific training and work as part of a network across the country, will help to tackle a fragmentation in the way safety issues are dealt with in the NHS and ensure nationwide action on key safety risks is coordinated. The proposals are part of a national patient safety strategy which is aiming to save 928 lives and £98.5m across the NHS, as well as reducing negligence claims by £750m by 2025. The specialists will be identified from existing staff, with part of the role focused on embedding a so-called “just culture” approach to safety. This means reducing blame, supporting staff who make honest errors and tackling systemic causes of mistakes. Read full story Source: The Independent, 26 December 2019 What do you think? Join the conversation on the hub.
  5. Content Article
    The teach-back and show-me methods are valuable tools for everyone to use with each patient and for all clinic staff to use. These methods can help you: improve patient understanding and adherence decrease call backs and cancelled appointments improve patient satisfaction and outcomes. Studies have shown that 40-80% of the medical information patients are told during office visits is forgotten immediately, and nearly half of the information retained is incorrect.
  6. Content Article
    We know from our own experiences and those of others that patient safety fears are growing daily across the NHS and social care. Staff shortages and burnout are all taking their toll on patient satisfaction, safety and standards of care. I had the pleasure of joining a webinar arranged by the Health Foundation last week where the National Director of Improvement for NHS England and NHS Improvement, Hugh McCaughey, outlined the up and coming improvement framework for the NHS. A good framework provides a skeleton on which to build. His presentation included the importance of: leadership both at the Board and at the front line people who are empowered and engaged a culture built on collaboration and continuous improvement, where it’s safe to learn co-production – engagement, empowerment and ‘lived experience’. Workshops, seminars and conversations across social media will follow in 2020 to build the thinking. So, be ready to contribute and help make sure patient safety is coming through as the top priority. And as you do, keep a copy of Roy Lilley’s latest blog in your hand. For those who don’t follow him, Roy is a health policy analyst, writer, broadcaster and commentator on the NHS and social issues. He recently posted this summary, outlining NHS electoral promises. Please do as he suggests – pin this up and bring it out every time you see a politician and whenever you have the opportunity. This way we can all ensure that these promises will be delivered.
  7. Content Article
    This White Paper: describes the framework's two foundational domains, culture and the learning system, outlining what is involved with each and how they interact provides definitions and implementation strategies for nine interrelated components (leadership, psychological safety, accountability, teamwork and communication, negotiation, transparency, reliability, improvement and measurement and continuous learning) discusses engagement of patients and their families, the core of the framework, the engine that drives the focus of the work to create safe, reliable, and effective care. Healthcare organisations and systems may use the framework as a roadmap to guide them in applying the principles, and as a diagnostic tool to assess their work to date. Although initially focused on the acute care setting, the framework has evolved to be more broadly applicable in any setting, in acute care, ambulatory care, home care, long-term care and in the community.
  8. Content Article
    This document provides hospital and health system administrators and leaders with: specific improvement ideas for five system-level strategies that address the challenges of preventing, identifying and treating opioid use disorder brief case examples describing other hospitals’ approaches source literature and additional resources, including cost savings data, where applicable.
  9. Content Article
    A scoping review was undertaken to describe the availability of evidence related to care homes’ patient safety culture, what these studies focused on, and identify any knowledge gaps within the existing literature. Included papers were each reviewed by two authors for eligibility and to draw out information relevant to the scoping review. Safety culture in care homes is a topic that has not been extensively researched. The review highlights a number of key gaps in the evidence base, which future research into safety culture in care home should attempt to address.
  10. Content Article
    ELFT's Quality Improvement website provides many resources, as well as their QI projects, events and training.
  11. Content Article
    The eight principles are as follows: The purpose of measurement is to collect and disseminate knowledge that results in action and improvement. Effective measurement requires the full involvement of patients, families, and communities within and across the health system. Safety measurement must advance equity. Selected measures must illuminate an integrated view of the health system across the continuum of care and the entire trajectory of the patient’s health journey. Data should be collected and analysed in real time to proactively identify and prevent harm as often as possible. Measurement systems, evidence, and practices must continuously evolve and adapt. The burden of measures collected and analysed must be reduced. Stakeholders must intentionally foster a culture that is safe and just to fully optimise the value of measurement. These principles, which are expanded upon in the statement, are a call to action for all stakeholders to reduce harm.
  12. Content Article
    The Act did two key things: Put a duty on the Government to produce and regularly review an autism strategy to meet the needs of autistic adults in England. The first ever strategy for autistic people in England, Fulfilling and rewarding lives, was published in 2010 with a commitment to review this strategy three years later. The new strategy, Think Autism, was published in April 2014. Put a duty on the Government to produce statutory guidance for local authorities to implement the strategy locally.
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