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Found 42 results
  1. Content Article
    This web page includes: Films The framework Community Breaking bad news Ceilings of treatment Resources Evidence-based advice for difficult conversations, by Professor Ruth Parry, Loughborough University Poster and sketch note Telephone call checklist
  2. Content Article
    The free version of Hospify is available right now and is in daily use at over 150 clinical sites around the country including London North West University Healthcare Trust, County Durham and Darlington, University Hospitals North Midlands, Frimley Park and Lincolnshire Community NHS Trust. Hospify is also backed by Innovate UK, Wayra Velocity Health (in partnership with Telefonica and MSD Pharmaceutical), Kent Surrey Sussex AHSN and the UNISON and Managers in Partnership Unions. A premium version of Hospify specifically designed for healthcare teams is also now available. Called the Hospify Hub, it features an online admin portal for onboarding staff, a web app that syncs with users’ phones, broadcast messaging/paging with document attachments and a survey and data collection tool. Please email info@hospify.com for more details or visit hub.hospify.com to set up a Hub and give it a try for yourself.
  3. Content Article
    This video is the first on several that have been shared in a series of tools and techniques to help you and allow you to help others.
  4. Content Article
    The activity book helps introduce children to ICUs, has activities to help them understand what ICUs do and what they might see when they visit one. They can write about how they feel, and their relative, if they would like to. The book also comes with an information sheet for parents or carers, about ways to support the child during this difficult time.
  5. Content Article
    After working last week and caring for patients who were pending COVID-19 swab results, four days later I woke feeling unwell. A slight cough, tired, pale, feeling freezing cold but no temperature and generally feeling rubbish. This carried on for a few days, I then ended up with common cold-like symptoms and a residual cough. Normally, I probably wouldn’t call in sick, I would have just carried on. Following current guidance, I called in sick and was advised to take the next 7 days off. At this point testing was unavailable for NHS staff. I was sat at home not knowing if I had the virus or not while my colleagues were having to pick up the slack. If I am completely honest, I was glad I didn’t have to go back. I was anxious that we didn’t have the right personal protective equipment (PPE), systems for donning and doffing were not in place, we didn’t know what to expect over the coming days, training for redeployed nurses and doctors was not happening. I just didn’t want to go back anyway. I felt a coward. Over the coming days while I was at home, my husband then became ill, then my youngest son, then the eldest. All with mild symptoms, but still no idea if we had it or not. While I was off, I was contacted by the ‘staff welfare team’. It was just a quick phone call to see how I was, but it made all the difference. I felt like I wasn’t just a ‘worker’ off sick, I was someone that they cared about and were obviously keen to make sure I was coming back! This has never happened before. Reluctantly, I return to work, but it was like I had stepped into a different Trust. Wards with infected patients were labelled as RED wards; huge signs were outside the wards with designated places to don and doff PPE. There were clear guidance on which PPE to wear displayed in poster format. There were green footsteps and red footsteps on the floor enabling you to know which area you were in. PPE safety officers had been deployed to reassure and ensure all departments have enough stock. It felt safer. Leadership at all levels is being tested at this time. Where I work in Brighton, we are invested in ‘Patient First’. This is headed up by our Kaizen Team. All staff are trained in differing levels of quality improvement (QI). All wards and departments have improvement huddles, where they can raise a mini project and see it through. We all speak the same QI language. I dread to think what would happen if we didn’t have this in place during this awful time. By having this process, it has empowered ALL staff to speak up and give permission for frontline staff to improve processes where they work. Our executive leadership team have done an amazing job in such a small amount of time. They have increased ITU capacity, they have reshaped rotas, redeployed staff, re employed staff, transformed patient pathways (red and green pathways), pooled staff, set up systems for donations… There has been so much achieved in a short amount of time; the top-level organisation has been incredible. All this in seven days. They have been phenomenal at strategy, planning and overall management and leadership of what I call ‘the big stuff’. What they are not so good at is the ‘small stuff’. We, frontline workers are brilliant at this. The practicalities of work – where can I don and doff, where the bins should be, how do I know this bed has been cleaned? What do we do when someone dies? Can relatives visit? How do we know who is who in PPE? How can we make sure we don’t contaminate clean areas? How do we take blood now? We know what needs to be improved, we know what is missing. It’s the small details that worries staff, it’s the small details that can save lives. As I was walking seeing patients from different wards, I heard staff saying – this isn’t right – we could improve that. They can raise a ticket on the huddle board and they could initiate the change. If the change could be replicated else where in the Trust, the Matron or ward manager can then raise it at the Bronze meeting, the bronze would then raise it to Silver and then implemented. I often hear that we use a top down, bottom up approach but never really thought it works, as there is so much red tape involved in healthcare. Quite often frontline ideas never reach the top level and they fall flat. This time it’s very different. To test the system, you need to stress the system. This system of QI and communication is working. We are all learning together. None of us have dealt with a pandemic before. Frontline staff have been given the permission to improve the way real work is done, quickly and safely, while the top-level management are concentrating on strategy, planning, implementation and co-ordination of services. We are listening to each other, we are rapidly changing and adapting, the whole Trust is in a constant state of PDSA cycles. It feels dynamic, proactive and controlled. If this pandemic happened 10 years ago in our trust, I am convinced that we would not be in the position we are now. We have enough intensive care beds, we have the capacity to expand further, we are ready.
  6. Content Article
    This article is about accepting that our working lives are difficult, that this is a big part of the attraction of our work and that it is wise to look at ways in which both team and personal resilience can be improved.
  7. News Article
    As the world writhes in the grip of Covid-19, the epidemic has revealed something majestic and inspiring: millions of health care workers running to where they are needed, on duty, sometimes risking their own lives. In his article in the New York Times, Don Berwick says he has never before seen such an extensive, voluntary outpouring of medical help at such a global scale. Millions of health care workers are running to where they are needed, sometimes risking their lives. Intensive care doctors in Seattle connect with intensive care doctors in Wuhan to gather specific intelligence on what the Chinese have learned: details of diagnostic strategies, the physiology of the disease, approaches to managing lung failure, and more. City by city, hospitals mobilise creatively to get ready for the possible deluge: bring in retired staff members, train nurses and doctors in real time, share data on supplies around the region, set up special isolation units and scale up capacity by a factor of 100 or 1000. "We are witnessing professionalism in its highest form, skilled people putting the interests of those they serve above their own interests." Read full article Source: New York Times, 23 March 2020
  8. Content Article
    We will need to work in different ways from usual and the focus should be what information you share and who you share it with, rather than how you share it. The following advice sets out some of the tools that you can use to support individual care, share information and communicate with colleagues during this time. This includes communications tools where data is stored outside of the UK. This advice is endorsed by the Information Commissioner’s Office, the National Data Guardian and NHS Digital.
  9. News Article
    On January 2020, Patient Safety will be on the G20 agenda (among other five health key priorities), but Abdulelah M. Alhawsawi, Saudi Patient Safety Center, asks "what is patient safety doing on an economic forum like the G20?" Patient harm is estimated to be the 14th leading cause of the global disease burden. This is comparable to medical conditions such as tuberculosis and malaria. In both US and Canada, patient safety adverse events represent the 3rd leading cause of death, preceded only by cancer and heart disease. In the US alone, 440,000 patients die annually from healthcare associated infections. In Canada, there are more than 28,000 deaths a year due to patient safety adverse events. In low-middle income countries, 134 million adverse events take place every year, resulting in 2.6 million deaths annually. In addition to lives lost and harm inflicted, unsafe medical practice results in money loss. Nearly, 15 % of the health expenditure across Organization of Economic Cooperative Development countries is attributed to patient safety failures each year, but if we add the indirect and opportunity cost (economic and social), the cost of harm could amount to trillions of dollars globally. When a patient is harmed, the country loses twice. The individual will be lost as a revenue generating source for society and the individual will become a burden on the healthcare system because he or she will require more treatment. Unless we do something different about patient safety, we would risk the sustainability of healthcare systems and the overall economies. Alhawsaw proposed establishing a G20 Patient Safety Network (Group) that will combine Safety experts from healthcare and other leading industries (like aviation, nuclear, oil and gas, other), and economy and fFinancial experts This will function as a platform to prioritise and come up with innovative patient safety solutions to solve global challenges while highlighting the return on investment (ROI) aspects. This multidisciplinary group of experts can work with each state that adopts the addressed global challenge to ensure correct implementation of proposed solution. Read full story Source: The G20 Health & Development Partnersip, 10 February 2020
  10. Content Article
    On January 2020, Patient Safety will be on the G20 agenda (amongst other five health key priorities). One would ask: What is Patient Safety doing on an economic forum like the G20? Another cynic might even add: What is Healthcare doing on the G20? The G20 was established in the late 1990s with the objective of its members working together to achieve economic and financial stability. It is comprised of 19 countries and the European Union (EU). The G20 collectively represent more than 85 % of the world’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and more than two- thirds of the world’s population. Healthcare was only introduced in 2017 during the German presidency. Why put patient safety on the G20 agenda? Patient harm is estimated to be the 14th leading cause of the global disease burden. This is comparable to medical conditions such as tuberculosis and malaria. In both U.S. and Canada, Patient Safety Adverse Events represent the 3rd leading cause of death, preceded only by cancer and heart disease. In the U.S. alone: 440 thousand patients die annually from healthcare associated infections (HAIS). In Canada: there are more than 28 thousand deaths a year due to Patient Safety Adverse Events. In Low – Middle Income Countries (LMIC), every year 134 million adverse events take place resulting in 2.6 million deaths annually. Having said all that, up to 70 % of harm is . (OECD, 2017) In addition to lives lost and harm inflicted, unsafe medical practice results in money loss. Nearly, 15 % of the health expenditure across Organization of Economic Cooperative Development (OECD) countries is attributed to patient safety failures each year (OECD 2017) But if we add the indirect and opportunity cost Economic & Social), the cost of harm could amount to trillions of dollars globally (OECD 2017). According to a report by Frost & Sullivan in 2018, Patient Safety Adverse Events cost the US alone 146.1 billion dollars annually. When you compare the cost of prevention to the cost of harm, the return on investment (ROI) becomes a “no brainer”. In a study that looked at patient safety ROI for Pressure Injuries, the cost of prevention was € 291.33 million compared to the cost of harm of € 2.59 billion (almost 1,000 times higher). (Demmarre et al 2015) Over the past 20 years, numerous efforts were made to improve patient safety in individual G20 countries as well as globally under the World Health Organization leadership. Despite all those efforts, the level of harm to patients persists and 20-40% of health resources are being wasted (WHO). Many healthcare structural causes are responsible for the ongoing harm: Healthcare Workforce Factors: In addition to the quality and quantity, the wellbeing and safety of health workforce are foundational to patient safety. A substantial body of research now points to link nurse staffing with patient outcomes. A business case by Needleman (2006) demonstrated cost saving from reduced complications and shorter length of stay associated with higher nurse staffing levels. This relationship is articulated clearly in the Jeddah Declaration on Patient Safety in 2019. Dall (2009) estimated the impact of increased nurse staffing on medical cost, lives saved and national productivity. Their research suggests that adding 133,000 nurses to U.S. hospitals would save 5900 lives per year, increase productivity by $1.3 billion, or about $9900 per year per additional nurse. Decrease in length of stay resulting from this additional nurse staffing would translate into medical savings of $6.1 billion and increased in productivity attributed to decreased length of stay was estimated at $231 million per year. Addressing and ensuring guidelines that are consistent with research findings for nursing staffing in acute settings is a viable key solution to prevent medical errors, improve patient safety and decrease cost of healthcare delivery. Healthcare Education Causes: Even though healthcare is provided by multi-disciplinary teams, healthcare education (undergraduate – postgraduate) continues to be conducted in separate settings. This siloed approach results in many of the communication failures / safety failures that are experienced on a regular basis. According to Joint Commission communication failures were the leading root cause of the sentinel events reported to the Joint Commission from 1995 to 2004. Healthcare education requires a serious reevaluation of its current curricula and practices. Furthermore, the lack of patient safety components to the medical and allied health sciences curriculum does a disservice to have safe medical practices imbedded within the day-to-day implementation of the healthcare workforce. Patient – Provider Information Asymmetry: The information and communication gap between the healthcare providers and their patients has caused ongoing harm. With the information abundance, patients turned to the internet as a source of guidance, regardless of its accuracy, which is minimally provided by Healthcare teams. Healthcare providers need to be the trusted guidance for information and the empowering force for patients to make informed decisions. Unempowered patients may result in lack of transparence and noncompliance to the care plans that contribute patient harm. Major movement for patient empowerment and community engagement is warranted. In addition, engaging patients can reduce the burden of harm by about 15%, saving billions of dollars each year. (WHO) Poor Safety Culture: The Hospital Survey on patient safety culture has been implemented in many countries to gain insight on the employees’ perception of the hospital patient safety culture. It has been consistently found that employees perceive hospital cultures lack transparency and results in punitive consequences when adverse events are reported. ‘Shame and Blame’ culture is one of the major barriers to improving safety. It is imperative that healthcare systems adopt strategies enabling Just Culture. Lack of consideration of Human Factors: In the healthcare sector, and since the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report “To Err is Human”, have come a long way in improving our services with elimination of potential harm in mind. However, healthcare can learn much more from other industries that have improved safety through use of HFE in redesigning work process and flow to ensure they are error-proof. HFE is an important discipline that can embed resilience to healthcare systems and could, potentially, transform patient safety. Lack of sufficient sharing and learning: The different sectors within the healthcare industry have created silos based on profession, departments, type of organization and many more subcultures and entities within a facility and at the national levels. This results in fragmented systems working in isolation, creating piece meal solutions and multi-levels of communication gaps, let alone the opportunity to share and learn in a manner that prevents harm from being repeated. Learning (from within healthcare), through Reporting & Learning Systems, and (from other industries), e.g. aviation, nuclear, oil & gas, is essential to healthcare safety innovation and transformation. Furthermore, population ageing has significant implications for patient safety as older adults are at higher risk for medical errors and the rate of adverse events due to increases in frailty, comorbidities, and incidences of chronic conditions, falls, and dementia makes providing health care more complex and increases costs. Individuals 65 years and older are at a two-fold risk for developing adverse events when compared with individuals between the ages of 16 and 44 years. (Brennan TA, Leape LL, Laird N, et al.) Nations across the G20 will face this challenge, which necessities innovate safety interventions and new approaches in health care to design a safer health care system. When it comes to patient safety, doing more of the same will result in: More lives will be lost More preventable harm will take place like Healthcare Associated Infections, medication errors, Anti-microbial Resistance (AMR) …etc. More money will be wasted (not to mention indirect cost and opportunity cost). When a patient is harmed, the COUNTRY LOSES TWICE: The individual will be lost as a revenue generating source for society+ the individual will become a burden on the healthcare system because he or she will require more treatment. Unless we do something different about patient safety, we would risk the sustainability of healthcare systems and the overall economies. Our G20 proposal for patient safety Establishing a G20 Patient Safety Network (Group) that will combine two types of expertise: Safety experts from healthcare and other leading industries (like Aviation, Nuclear, Oil & Gas, other) Economy and Financial Experts This will function as a platform to prioritize and come up with innovative patient safety solutions to solve Global Challenges while highlighting the return on investment (ROI) aspects. This multidisciplinary group of experts can work with each state that adopts the addressed Global Challenge to ensure correct implementation of proposed solution. Benefit Investment in Patient Safety – – > sustainability of healthcare systems – – > and overall economies. In conclusion, patient safety is a global priority that goes beyond healthcare. It is a challenge that requires the collective wisdom of the G20 and the overall global community. It is not just an issue for health ministers, but it is an important issue that requires the attention of finance ministers and heads of states. The economic cost of failing patient safety could be risking the sustainability of healthcare systems and the overall global economies. WE NEED TO ACT NOW!
  11. Community Post
    We know from academic research that patient engagement reduces the risk of unsafe care and harm, in patients own care and improving safety for all. Some organisations are investing time (if not money!) in recruiting, training and supporting patient leaders to work with Executives and senior staff, sharing their experience and as they engage with staff and patients, report back what they see. The model in Berkshire, as shared with me by Douglas Findlay, patient leader, is that they don’t make decisions on what needs to change and how, but report back what they see for others to learn and act. Do we know of other models of good practice? What can we learn and share from them?
  12. News Article
    This week is Patient Safety Awareness Week, an annual recognition event intended to encourage everyone to learn more about healthcare safety. During this week, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) seeks to advance important discussions locally and globally, and inspire action to improve the safety of the health care system — for patients and the workforce. Patient Safety Awareness Week serves as a dedicated time and platform for growing awareness about patient safety and recognising the work already being done. Although there has been real progress made in patient safety over the past two decades, current estimates cite medical harm as a leading cause of death worldwide. The World Health Organization estimates that 134 million adverse events occur each year due to unsafe care in hospitals in low- and middle-income countries, resulting in some 2.6 million deaths. Additionally, some 40 percent of patients experience harm in ambulatory and primary care settings with an estimated 80 percent of these harms being preventable, according to WHO. Some studies suggest that as many as 400,000 deaths occur in the United States each year as a result of errors or preventable harm. Not every case of harm results in death, yet they can cause long-term impact on the patient's physical health, emotional health, financial well-being, or family relationships. Preventing harm in healthcare settings is a public health concern. Everyone interacts with the health care system at some point in life. And everyone has a role to play in advancing safe healthcare. Learn more about IHI's work to advance patient safety.
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