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Found 47 results
  1. Event
    Join clinical experts, thought leaders, and advocates for a collaborative discussion on the issues of health disparities, structural racism, and medicine as they examine specific dermatologic diseases in a series of four free and open educational webinars from the Harvard Medical School. Structural racism and racial bias in medicine: Wednesday, October 28, 1:00-2:15 PM ET Hair disorders in people of colour: Thursday, November 12, 1:00-2:15 PM ET Pigmentary disorders and keloids: Wednesday, November 18, 1:00-2:15 PM ET COVID-19 Comorbidities and cutaneous manifestations of systemic diseases in adults and children: Wednesday, December 2, 1:00-2:15 PM ET Implicit bias and structural racism play a central role in the development of healthcare disparities. One of the critically important areas in medicine is the misdiagnosis of disease in people with darker skin types due to implicit bias and the lack of awareness among physicians in recogniszing the disease pattern. Clinicians in primary care, emergency medicine, hospital medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and other medical specialties can deliver improved care if they can recognize and diagnose medical conditions based on skin findings in patients of color. This four-part series aims to improve diagnosis in people of color, describe pathogenesis and treatment of diseases, develop cultural competency, and impact change in health care policy so more is done to reduce racial bias in medical practice and medical research. Providing this education, in turn, will ultimately help reduce health disparities and improve the lives of underrepresented minority populations. Register for one event or all four.
  2. News Article
    Seeking help for mental health is never easy but for some members of London's Punjabi community, the shame and stigma associated means they have struggled more than most. Anyone having "problems of the mind" is often considered a burden upon the family says Dr Rakish Rana, founder of the Clear Coach, who added that a lack of education on mental health means it is considered a taboo subject. "To support those with mental health issues, there needs to be more awareness in the South Asian community, whether that's through religious or community leaders, schools and families," he said. "As with all cases of mental health, it needs to be openly discussed and normalised." Shuranjeet Singh, the founder of Taraki, a not-for-profit mental health organisation, said its research carried out into the Punjabi community found more than half of respondents reported a decline in their mental health as a result of Covid-19. "I can see stigma slowly reducing and I hope that community-focused solutions are well researched and funded, because no community is truly 'hard to reach'." Read full story Source: BBC News, 3 October 2020
  3. Content Article
    Join the Motherhood Group from the 28 September as they continue to spread awareness and amplify the black motherhood mental health experience in the UK. The week includes a series of planned events covering a variety of topics, listed below. 28th September - Why do we need a black maternal mental health week? 29th September - Self love - what does it look like? 30th September - Speaking out - sharing our stories and amplifying our voices 1st October - Good support - offering guidance and signposting 2nd October - Strong Black Woman Myth and Cultural Factors 3rd October - Creating Safe spaces - Black Mum Fest 2020 4th October - Self-reflection - what can we do better to improve BMMH. You can register and find out more about who is speaking throughout Black Maternal Mental Health Week, by following the link below.
  4. News Article
    Almost two-thirds of black Britons think the NHS does less to protect their health than that of white people, research has found. That negative view of the health service is shared by a majority of black people of almost all ages, and is held especially strongly by black women, according to findings of a study commissioned by a parliamentary committee. Overall, 64% of black people do not believe that their health is as protected by the NHS compared with white people’s. When asked if they thought it was, 34.3% disagreed and another 29.6% disagreed strongly, while just 19.9% agreed and a further 2.4% agreed strongly. The survey was commissioned by MPs and peers on the joint committee on human rights as part of its inquiry into black people, racism and human rights in the UK. The report will be published and debated with the authors at an evidence session today. Read full story Source: The Guardian, 7 September 2020
  5. Content Article
    The link below will take to you a number of case studies showing how healthcare teams have responded and made changes to improve how they protect, support and engage staff. The case studies include examples from primary care, secondary care, infection prevention and staff education programmes. Also included is information and guidance on: risk assessments protecting all staff speaking up regional support.
  6. Content Article
    Recommendations include: Employers should carry out risk assessments for staff with vulnerable characteristics, including those from black and minority ethnic backgrounds, as well as those from disadvantaged communities. Employers should ensure that all key workers in public-facing roles have access to adequate PPE. The government should establish a tailored Find, Test, Trace, Isolate and Support (FTTIS) programme which ensures that marginalised and BME communities who are more vulnerable to the coronavirus are identified and supported.Temporary housing, including hotels, bed and breakfasts, and community shelters, should be made available to individuals to facilitate self-isolation of symptomatic individuals.The social security safety net should be significantly strengthened. The government should increase Statutory Sickness Pay (SSP) and broaden eligibility for SSP.The government must address the root causes of health, housing and employment inequality. 
  7. News Article
    African American children are three times more likely than their white peers to die after surgery despite arriving at hospitals without serious underlying conditions, the latest evidence of unequal outcomes in health care, according to a study published in the journal Pediatrics, “We know that traditionally, African Americans have poorer health outcomes across every age strata you can look at,” said Olubukola Nafiu, the lead researcher and an anaesthesiologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. “One of the explanations that’s usually given for that, among many, is that African American patients tend to have higher comorbidities. They tend to be sicker.” But his research challenges that explanation, he said, by finding a racial disparity even among otherwise healthy children who came to hospitals for mostly elective surgeries. Out of 172,549 children, 36 died within a month of their operation. But of those children, nearly half were black – even though African Americans made up 11% of the patients overall. Black children had a 0.07% chance of dying after surgery, compared with 0.02% for white children. Postoperative complications and serious adverse events were also more likely among the black patients and they were more likely to require a blood transfusion, experience sepsis, have an unplanned second operation or be unexpectedly intubated. Read full story Source: The Independent, 20 July 2020
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