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Found 220 results
  1. Event
    until
    Mental ill health will always be a part of many people’s lives but, increasingly, many of the causes of mental ill health can be successfully addressed. Preventive approaches can help to reduce levels of mental ill health in the population and can also mean that more people living with mental health problems are able to stay well and avoid relapse or crisis. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that addressing growing levels of mental ill health is one of the defining public health challenges of our time. Preventive approaches are fundamental to achieving this, but there often needs to be greater clarity about what these mean in practice and how they can be implemented within the NHS, local communities, schools and families. From health promotion to suicide prevention, and from the role of general practitioners to that of local authorities, this conference will bring together experts from all parts of the health and care sector to discuss what prevention means with regard to mental health and how preventive approaches can be applied in practice. Join us to hear from a range of speakers, including academic and policy experts, national body leaders, frontline staff, experts by experience and young people. This event is run in partnership with the Mental Health Foundation. You can watch the sessions live or catch up on demand until Sunday 20 December. Register
  2. Content Article
    Join the Motherhood Group from the 28 September as they continue to spread awareness and amplify the black motherhood mental health experience in the UK. The week includes a series of planned events covering a variety of topics, listed below. 28th September - Why do we need a black maternal mental health week? 29th September - Self love - what does it look like? 30th September - Speaking out - sharing our stories and amplifying our voices 1st October - Good support - offering guidance and signposting 2nd October - Strong Black Woman Myth and Cultural Factors 3rd October - Creating Safe spaces - Black Mum Fest 2020 4th October - Self-reflection - what can we do better to improve BMMH. You can register and find out more about who is speaking throughout Black Maternal Mental Health Week, by following the link below.
  3. Content Article
    Key findings 281 nurses who died by suicide were identified over the six-year study period; of these 204 (73%) were female – these were the main focus of the study. Female nurses were older than other women who died by suicide; nearly half were aged 45-54 years. The most common method of suicide for female nurses was self-poisoning (42%). • More than half (60%) of female nurses who died were not in contact with mental health services. 102 nurses who died were identified as patients; of these, 81 (79%) were female and their clinical histories were examined further. Their age distribution was similar to that of nurses in the general population who die by suicide, 40% being aged 45-54 years. Female nurses who were patients were similar to female patients in other occupations. The main primary diagnoses were affective disorders (59%), followed by personality disorders (19%). Overall 41% had a history of alcohol misuse and 20% reported a history of drug misuse. Nearly two-thirds of female nurses had a history of self-harm (64%). Self-poisoning accounted for 48% of the deaths by female nurses. The main drugs taken were psychotropics (33%), opiates (31%), and paracetamol (19%). Although prevalence of experiencing adverse life events within three months of death was similar across the groups, female nurses were reported to have more workplace problems (18%). There were few differences in the care received by the female nurses and by women in other occupations, though it was less common for nurses to have had a previous short psychiatric admission of seven days or fewer, and they were more often prescribed SSRIs/SNRIs.
  4. Content Article
    Over 200,000 babies were born when lockdown was at its most restrictive, between 23 March and 4 July. The survey of 5,474 respondents suggests that the impact of COVID-19 on these babies could be severe and may be longlasting. The report found: 6 in 10 (61%) parents shared significant concerns about their mental health. A quarter (24%) of pregnant respondents who cited mental health as a main concern said they would like help with this, rising to almost a third (32%) of those with a baby. Only around 3 in 10 (32%) were confident that they could find help for their mental health if they needed it. Almost 9 in 10 (87%) parents were more anxious as a result of COVID-19 and the lockdown. There was a notable variation among respondents who reported feeling ‘a lot’ more anxious: White 42%, Black/ Black British 46%, Asian/Asian British 50%, parents 25 years old or under 54%, and parents with a household income of less than £16k 55%.
  5. News Article
    More than one in four patients with severe mental health conditions are missing diagnosis when they are admitted to hospital for other reasons, new research suggests. According to data analysed by scientists at University College London, those who are missing these mental illness diagnoses are more likely to be from ethnic minority groups or have a previously diagnosed mental illnesses. However, the situation has improved – in 2006 it was found that mental health diagnoses were missed in more than 50% of cases. "We found encouraging signs that clinicians are more frequently identifying severe mental illnesses in hospital patients than they were a decade ago,” Hassan Mansour, a research assistant at UCL psychiatry, said. “But there's a lot more that can be done, particularly to address disparities between ethnic groups, to ensure that everyone gets the best care available. Training in culturally-sensitive diagnosis may be needed to reduce inequalities in medical care." The researchers have suggested these findings may be due to language barriers or stigma felt by patients. It was also suggested that clinicians may be less able to detect these conditions in people from other ethnic and cultural groups. Read full story Source: The Independent, 18 September 2020
  6. News Article
    Tens of thousands of people avoided going to hospital for life-threatening illnesses such as heart attacks during Britain's coronavirus crisis, data has revealed. Shocking figures reveal that admissions for seven deadly non-coronavirus conditions between March and June fell by more than 173,000 on the previous year. Previous data for England shows there were nearly 6,000 fewer admissions for heart attacks in March and April compared with last year, and almost 137,000 fewer cancer admissions from March to June. Analysis by the Daily Mail found that the trends were alarmingly similar across the board for patients who suffered strokes, diabetes, dementia, mental health conditions and eating disorders. Health experts said the statistics were 'troubling' and warned that many patients may have died or suffered longterm harm as a result. Gbemi Babalola, senior analyst at the King's Fund think-tank said: "People with some of the most serious health concerns are going without the healthcare they desperately need. Compared with the height of the pandemic, the NHS is seeing an increase in the number of patients as services restart, and significant effort is going into new ways to treat and support patients." "But the fact remains that fewer people are being treated by NHS services." Read full story Source: Daily Mail, 13 September 2020
  7. Event
    until
    Human rights are central to proper mental health care and treatment. Legally, people working in public service, “public officials” (such as NHS staff, local authority staff and the police), have to protect, respect and fulfil your human rights in all of their decisions and actions. This duty to uphold human rights has not changed during the COVID-19 pandemic. This duty to protect human rights is as important as ever, as services are facing increased stress due to the pandemic. COVID-19 has meant that many of the support networks that we all used to use no longer exist in the same way. Added to this some of the changes to mental health law affect the safeguards put in place for people who are receiving mental health care and treatment. For example, changes to the way mental health tribunals are being held in Wales and England. However, any changes that are made to existing laws, even if temporary still need to be compatible with our human rights law. The emergency laws for the COVID-19 period to not provide and opt-out of human rights laws. This means that it is more important than ever that both staff and people accessing mental health services know about human rights and the legal duties of public officials to protect, respect and fulfil them. It is important for all of use to know that our human rights must still be respected, protected and fulfilled during all of our interactions with public services. This webinar, led by Professor Tim Kendall is designed to provide policy makers and the wider health community with the latest evidence on the impact of COVID-19 on mental health and how to address it. Registration
  8. Content Article
    There are three work programmes to explore workforce retention and configuration in healthcare. The first programme will combine and align multiple large datasets from 20 NHS trusts across secondary care and mental health and 10 ambulance trusts. This will enable the analysis of multiple variables and their effect on workforce retention, and how these variables, in combination with workforce retention, subsequently impact patient outcomes. The second work programme will involve designing and testing an infrastructure for the routine extraction, combination and analysis of these large datasets. This will enable the adoption of these techniques across the NHS. The nursing element (NuRS) will start first, with the ambulance staff (AmReS) element following approximately six months later. A third programme will examine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on patient safety in terms of reporting behaviours, for example; and will explore how nursing and ambulance workforce configuration in response to a pandemic affects patient safety and quality of care. This project is a unique opportunity to unlock the key underlying drivers of nurse and ambulance retention and determine their impact on care quality, helping to tackle the challenge of supply in the NHS and ensure that high quality, sustainable care is available to all.
  9. News Article
    In April, when the coronavirus outbreak was at its peak in the UK and tearing through hospitals, junior doctor Rebecca Thornton’s mental health took a turn for the worse and she ended up having to be sectioned. Even now, three months later, she cannot face going back to her job and thinks it will take her a year to recover from some of the horrors she saw while working on a Covid ward in a deprived area of London. “It was horrendous,” Thornton recalls. “It’s so harrowing to watch people die, day in, day out. Every time someone passed away, I’d say, ‘This is my fault’. Eventually I stopped eating and sleeping.” Thornton’s case may sound extreme but her experiences of working through Covid are far from unique. More than 1,000 doctors plan to quit the NHS over the government’s handling of the pandemic, according to a recent survey, with some citing burnout as a cause. A psychologist offering services to NHS staff throughout the UK, who asked to remain anonymous, has witnessed the toll on staff. “I’ve seen signs of PTSD in some healthcare workers,” she says. “Staff really stood up to the plate and worked incredibly hard. It was a crisis situation that moved very quickly ... After it subsided a little bit, the tiredness became very clear.” Roisin Fitzsimons, who is head of the Nightingale Academy, which provides a platform to share best practice in nursing and midwifery, and consultant nurse at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS foundation trust, also worries about the looming threat of an uncertain future. “Are our staff prepared? Do they have the resilience to go through this again? That’s the worry and that’s the unknown. Burnout is hitting people now. People are processing and realising what they’ve gone through.” Read full story Source: The Guardian, 8 September 2020
  10. News Article
    Over 1,000 doctors plan to quit the NHS because they are disillusioned with the government’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic and frustrated about their pay, a new survey has found. The doctors either intend to move abroad, take a career break, switch to private hospitals or resign to work as locums instead, amid growing concern about mental health and stress levels in the profession. “NHS doctors have come out of this pandemic battered, bruised and burned out”, said Dr Samantha Batt-Rawden, president of the Doctors’ Association UK, which undertook the research. The large number of medics who say they will leave the NHS within three years is “a shocking indictment of the government’s failure to value our nation’s doctors,” she added. “These are dedicated professionals who have put their lives on the line time and time again to keep patients in the NHS safe, and we could be about to lose them.
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