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Found 87 results
  1. News Article
    Sending thousands of older untested patients into care homes in England at the start of the coronavirus lockdown was a violation of their human rights, Amnesty International has said. A report says government decisions were "inexplicable" and "disastrous", affecting mental and physical health. More than 18,000 people living in care homes died with COVID-19 and Amnesty says the public inquiry promised by the government must begin immediately. According to Amnesty's report, a "number of poor decisions at both the national and local levels had serious negative consequences for the health and lives of older people in care homes and resulted in the infringement of their human rights" as enshrined in law. Researchers for the organisation interviewed relatives of older people who either died in care homes or are currently living in one; care home owners and staff, and legal and medical professionals. Amnesty said it received reports of residents being denied GP and hospital NHS services during the pandemic, "violating their right to health and potentially their right to life, as well as their right to non-discrimination". It adds that care home managers reported to its researchers that they were "pressured in different ways" to accept patients discharged from hospital who had not been tested or had COVID-19. Amnesty says the public inquiry into the pandemic should begin with an "interim phase". "The pandemic is not over," it added. "Lessons must be learned; remedial action must be taken without delay to ensure that mistakes are not repeated." Read full story Source: BBC News, 4 October 2020
  2. News Article
    Doctors and carers should look out for signs of confusion or strange behaviour in frail older people because it could be an early warning sign of COVID-19, research suggests. Even if they have no cough or fever, delirium is more common in vulnerable over-65s than other, fitter people of the same age. But it's not yet clear why this extreme confusion or delirium happens. In this King's College London study, data from more than 800 people over the age of 65 was analysed. They included 322 patients in hospital with COVID-19, and 535 people using the Covid Symptom Study app to record their symptoms or log health reports on behalf of friends and family. All had received a positive test result. The researchers found that older adults admitted to hospital who were classified as frail were more likely to have had delirium as one of their symptoms, compared with people of the same age who weren't frail. For one in five patients in hospital with Covid, delirium was their only symptom. The study calls for more awareness of it in hospitals and care homes. Read full story Source: BBC News, 30 September 2020
  3. Event
    until
    The COVID-19 pandemic has put a spotlight on the rights and needs of older persons. While everyone has been affected, evidence shows that older people are among those most at risk of complications from the disease, with fatality rates for those over 80 years of age five times the global average. They are also at greater risk of poverty, discrimination and isolation. Older persons have been hit particularly hard by the virus itself but it has been the failure to protect their rights in the response that has led to unnecessary deaths, unmet health and care needs, increased isolation, discrimination and stigma. This webinar will: Recognise the impact of COVID-19 on the wellbeing and dignity of older persons across the Commonwealth. Raise awareness of ageism, stigma and discrimination against older people in the COVID-19 response and the need to foster intergenerational connections across the Commonwealth. Reflect on how The Commonwealth needs to adapt to ensure the rights of its citizens of all ages are respected. Register
  4. Content Article
    Recommendations As a result of the national investigation, HSIB has made three safety recommendations to facilitate better understanding of the role of the ward-based pharmacist, and to encourage best practice and resilience when identifying and developing models of pharmacy provision. It is recommended that NHS England and NHS Improvement carry out work to understand and further define the work of hospital clinical pharmacy teams, including the period between initial medicine reconciliation and discharge, in consultation with relevant stakeholders. It is recommended that the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, supported by NHS England and NHS Improvement, should provide guidance on models of hospital clinical pharmacy provision. The guidance should provide information on the models’ ability to enhance safety and healthcare resilience and include consideration of the appropriate skill mix and experience within the clinical pharmacy team. It is recommended that the NHS Specialist Pharmacy Service should update its resource on the prioritisation of hospital clinical pharmacy services to facilitate the dissemination of developments in good practice and policy with respect to pharmacy prioritisation and the issues highlighted in this report.
  5. Content Article
    What is known • The prevalence of dementia experiences and the cost of dementia care will continue to dramatically escalate in the next 20 years. • At a strategic level, commissioning frameworks in the UK are prioritising effective integrated, multidisciplinary working. • We know very little about the challenges encountered by practitioners at the ground level. What this paper adds • Unique interpretative analysis of the views and perspectives of a range of dementia service practitioners. • Insights into how current commissioning frameworks risk accentuating inter‐practitioner prejudices, communication breakdown and practice overlap. • Suggestions of how commissioning frameworks could proactively diffuse inter‐agency prejudices. For example, through encouraging statutory and third‐sector service providers to form consortia bids and to build relationships through shadowing and shared office space.
  6. News Article
    An emergency unit at a Norwich hospital has reduced ward admissions and is helping shield urgent non-COVID-19 patients. The older people’s emergency department (Oped) – a special unit at the Norfolk and Norwich university hospital – is providing emergency care for patients over 80. Launched in 2017, the unit, just down the corridor from A&E, has six beds, two in side rooms and no waiting room. Normally, it admits patients identified as frail and usually with multiple conditions that need a lot of care (such as cognitive impairment, incontinence or reduced mobility). They are brought straight in by ambulance or trolley from other parts of the hospital and seen by a consultant geriatrician within two hours. A team of nurses with experience in both emergency care and care of the elderly, pharmacists and physiotherapists are on hand to support patients much more quickly than A&E to get patients out of hospital and back home within the same day wherever possible. For patients who need to stay longer after treatment there is an adjacent ambulatory ward. This unique model is showing results. The proportion of the specialist department’s patients admitted to the hospital is 50% compared with 68% for the same age group of emergency patients coming to the hospital five years ago, when they were treated at the normal A&E. When Oped patients are admitted, their average length of stay is 1.2 days less. “It’s just what we want for old people,” says Dr Sarah Bailey, the department’s lead consultant geriatrician. “We get the experts in straight away because we recognised that’s the best thing for [them]”. During the pandemic, the unit is helping to keep those who do not have coronavirus symptoms, such as those with injuries from falls and some stroke patients, away from the main A&E ward, providing a degree of shielding not normally possible. But for most NHS trusts, providing a separate unit like Oped is not feasible. “Hospitals are working to separate emergency patients with respiratory problems from those with other conditions,” says Dr Jay Banerjee, who leads the Royal College of Emergency Medicine’s work on emergency care for the elderly. “But most just do not have the capacity to also try to separate elderly patients with other conditions from younger patients.” Read full story Source: The Guardian, 27 May 2020
  7. News Article
    Once COVID-19 seeps into care homes, it is a monumentally difficult job to protect the residents, writes Sky's Alex Crawford. We will look back at this appalling, tragic episode in our global history, and our children and grandchildren will ask us: "Did that really happen? Did you really leave the most vulnerable of our society - the elderly, the infirm, the defenceless, the muddled, sick and weak - in care homes, shut away from their closest relatives? Did you leave them to be ravaged by a deadly virus, and do very little to help them?" Because that is what's happening right now. There are elderly people - many with Alzheimer's, many with dementia, many frail - in thousands of residential homes up and down Britain, and they are very much at risk. Read full story Source: Sky News, 11 Aril 2020
  8. News Article
    Hundreds of people are dying in care homes from confirmed or suspected coronavirus without yet being officially counted, the Guardian has learned. More than 120 residents of the UK’s largest charitable provider of care homes are thought to have died from the virus in the last three weeks, while another network of care homes is reported to have recorded 88 deaths. Care England, the industry body, estimated that the death toll is likely to be close to 1,000, despite the only available official figure for care home fatalities being dramatically lower. The gulf in the figures has prompted warnings that ministers are underestimating the impact of Covid-19 on society’s most frail, and are failing to sufficiently help besieged care homes and workers. Read full story Source: The Guardian, 7 April 2020
  9. News Article
    Elderly care home residents have been categorised “en masse” as not requiring resuscitation, in a strategy branded unacceptable by the healthcare regulator. People in care homes in Hove, East Sussex and south Wales are among those who have had “do not attempt resuscitation” (DNAR) notices applied to their care plans during the coronavirus outbreak without proper consultation with them or their families, MPs and medical unions fear. Care homes in Leeds have reported that district nurses have been asking them to “revisit do not resuscitate conversations with people who said they didn’t want them” and a care worker in Wales told the Guardian that after a visit from a GP, all 20 of their residents had DNAR notices attached to their plans. DNAR notices are a common part of care plans and many people wish to have them in place because, in the event of cardiac arrest, attempts to resuscitate can cause serious trauma, including broken bones. But the Care Quality Commission and other medical bodies are so concerned about the blanket application of the notices that it has issued a warning to stop. “It is unacceptable for advance care plans, with or without DNAR form completion, to be applied to groups of people of any description,” the notice states. “These decisions must continue to be made on an individual basis according to need.” Read full story Source: The Guardian, 1 April 2020
  10. News Article
    Healthcare professionals have been told to consider not treating patients with the COVID-19 coronavirus if they themselves would be put at risk, part of new ethical guidance that calls on doctors to prioritise some ailments over the pandemic. The new recommendations for healthcare professionals over 70 years, or with pre-existing conditions, to put themselves first when tackling the pandemic comes following the death of a doctor who returned to the frontlines as a volunteer following a call to arms from the government. The guidance from the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) makes up part of a sweeping list of ethical considerations faced by healthcare workers in the face of the global pandemic. Read full story Source: The Independent, 2 April 2020
  11. Content Article
    Background and scope of guidanceWhat do we mean by extremely vulnerable?What you need to knowSymptomsWhat is shielding?What should you do if you have someone else living with you?Handwashing and respiratory hygieneWhat should you do if you develop symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19)?How can you get assistance with foods and medicines if you are shielding?What should you do if you have hospital and GP appointments during this period?What is the advice for visitors, including those who are providing care for you?What is the advice for informal carers who provide care for someone who is extremely vulnerable?How do you look after your mental well-being?What steps can you take to stay connected with family and friends during this time?What is the advice for people living in long-term care facilities, either for the elderly or persons with special needs?What is the advice for parents and schools with extremely vulnerable children?
  12. Content Article
    This regulation 28 is around testing of patient call bells in care homes. Questions: Have you got a system for checking call bells where you work? Are the call bells always in reach of the patient?
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