Jump to content

Search the hub

Showing results for tags 'Health inequalities'.


More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Start to type the tag you want to use, then select from the list.

  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • All
    • Commissioning, service provision and innovation in health and care
    • Coronavirus (COVID-19)
    • Culture
    • Improving patient safety
    • Investigations, risk management and legal issues
    • Leadership for patient safety
    • Organisations linked to patient safety (UK and beyond)
    • Patient engagement
    • Patient safety in health and care
    • Patient Safety Learning
    • Professionalising patient safety
    • Research, data and insight
    • Miscellaneous

Categories

  • Commissioning, service provision and innovation in health and care
    • Commissioning and funding patient safety
    • Digital health and care service provision
    • Health records and plans
    • Innovation programmes in health and care
  • Coronavirus (COVID-19)
    • Blogs
    • Data, research and statistics
    • Frontline insights during the pandemic
    • Good practice and useful resources
    • Guidance
    • Mental health
    • Exit strategies
    • Patient recovery
  • Culture
    • Bullying and fear
    • Good practice
    • Occupational health and safety
    • Safety culture programmes
    • Second victim
    • Speak Up Guardians
    • Staff safety
    • Whistle blowing
  • Improving patient safety
    • Clinical governance and audits
    • Design for safety
    • Disasters averted/near misses
    • Equipment and facilities
    • Error traps
    • Human factors (improving human performance in care delivery)
    • Improving systems of care
    • Implementation of improvements
    • International development and humanitarian
    • Safety stories
    • Stories from the front line
    • Workforce and resources
  • Investigations, risk management and legal issues
  • Leadership for patient safety
  • Organisations linked to patient safety (UK and beyond)
  • Patient engagement
  • Patient safety in health and care
  • Patient Safety Learning
  • Professionalising patient safety
  • Research, data and insight
  • Miscellaneous

News

  • News

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start
    End

Last updated

  • Start
    End

Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


First name


Last name


Country


About me


Organisation


Role

Found 149 results
  1. News Article
    When pharmacist Ifeoma Onwuka, known to her friends as Laura, went into hospital to have her daughter, she and her husband hoped the delivery would go smoothly, and that they would soon be able to take their new arrival home  to meet her siblings.  Onwuka's labor was induced at James Paget University Hospital in Great Yarmouth in late April 2018. Things progressed quickly and there were soon signs that her baby was in distress, causing staff to begin preparations for an emergency Caesarian section, but Onwuka's daughter was born in the recovery room. Shortly after the birth, Onwuka's condition began to deteriorate. According to the family's lawyer, Tim Deeming, she began to bleed heavily, and was taken into surgery where attempts were made to stem the loss of blood. Hours later, and only after a second consultant had been called in, she was given an emergency hysterectomy. The mother-of-three died three days later. The coroner, Yvonne Blake, said an expert had told Onwuka's inquest that the delay to surgery contributed to her death, since acting early could have controlled the bleeding.  Black mothers have worse outcomes during pregnancy or childbirth than any other ethnic group in England. According to the latest confidential inquiry into maternal deaths (MBRRACE-UK). Black people in England are four times more likely to die in pregnancy or within the first six weeks of childbirth than their White counterparts.  Read full story Source: CNN. 14 January 2021
  2. Content Article
    The majority of recommendations which MBRRACE-UK assessors have identified to improve care are drawn directly from existing guidance or reports and denote areas where implementation of existing guidance needs strengthening. In a small number of instances, actions are needed for which national guidelines are not available. These are included below. To access the report and the full list of recommendations, please click on the link at the bottom of this page. New recommendations to improve care: For professional organisations 1. Develop guidance to ensure SUDEP awareness, risk assessment and risk minimisation is standard care for women with epilepsy before, during and after pregnancy and ensure this is embedded in pathways of care. [ACTION: Royal Colleges of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Physicians]. 2. Develop guidance to indicate the need for definitive radiological diagnosis in women who have an inconclusive VQ scan [ACTION: Royal Colleges of Physicians, Radiologists, Obstetricians and Gynaecologists]. 3. Produce guidance on which bedside tests should be used for assessment of coagulation and the required training to perform and interpret those tests [ACTION: Royal Colleges of Anaesthetists, Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Physicians] 4. Establish a mechanism to disseminate the learning from this report, not only to maternity staff, but more widely to GPs, emergency department practitioners, physicians and surgeons [ACTION: Academy of Medical Royal Colleges]. For policy makers, service planners/commissioners and service managers 5. Develop clear standards of care for joint maternity and neurology services, which allow for: early referral in pregnancy, particularly if pregnancy is unplanned, to optimise anti-epileptic drug regimens; rapid referral for neurology review if women have worsening epilepsy symptoms; pathways for immediate advice for junior staff out of hours; postnatal review to ensure anti-epileptic drug doses are appropriately adjusted [ACTION: NHSE/I and equivalents in the devolved nations and Ireland]. 6. Ensure each regional maternal medicine network has a pathway to enable women to access their designated epilepsy care team within a maximum of two weeks. [ACTION: Maternal Medicine Networks and equivalent structures in Ireland and the devolved nations]. 7. Ensure all maternity units have access to an epilepsy team [ACTION: Service Planners/Commissioners, Hospitals/Trusts/Health Boards]. 8. Establish pathways to facilitate rapid specialist stroke care for women with stroke diagnosed in inpatient maternity settings [ACTION: Service Planners/Commissioners, Hospitals/Trusts/Health Boards]. 9. Provide specialist multidisciplinary care for pregnant women who have had bariatric surgery by a team who have expertise in bariatric disorders [ACTION: Service Planners/Commissioners, Hospitals/Trusts/Health Boards]. 10. Use the scenarios identified from review of the care of women who died for ‘skills and drills’ training [ACTION: Hospitals/Trusts/Health Boards]. 11. Ensure early senior involvement in the care of women with extremely preterm prelabour rupture of membranes and a full explanation of the risks and benefits of continuing the pregnancy. This should include discussion of termination of pregnancy [ACTION: Hospitals/Trusts/Health Boards]. For health professionals 12. Regard nocturnal seizures as a ‘red flag’ indicating women with epilepsy need urgent referral to an epilepsy service or obstetric physician [ACTION: All Health Professionals]. 13. Ensure that women on prophylactic and treatment dose anticoagulation have a structured management plan to guide practitioners during the antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum period [ACTION: All HealthProfessionals]. 14. Ensure at least one senior clinician takes a ‘helicopter view’ of the management of a woman with major obstetric haemorrhage to coordinate all aspects of care [ACTION: All Health Professionals]. iv MBRRACE-UK - Saving Lives, Improving Mothers’ Care 2020 15. Ensure that the response to obstetric haemorrhage is tailored to the proportionate blood loss as a percentage of circulating blood volume based on a woman’s body weight [ACTION: All Health Professionals]. 16. Do not perform controlled cord traction if there are no signs of placental separation (blood loss and lengthening of the cord) and take steps to manage the placenta as retained [ACTION: All Health Professionals]. 17. Be aware that signs of uterine inversion include pain when attempting to deliver the placenta, a rapid deterioration of maternal condition and a loss of fundal height without delivery of the placenta [ACTION: All Health Professionals].
  3. Event
    until
    One of the great opportunities for ICSs may be around reducing future demand for healthcare by ensuring that people remain healthy or are helped to reduce the chances of deteriorating if they do develop an illness or long-term condition. Prevention and early intervention underlie much of the NHS Long Term Plan, with a recognition that the NHS can no longer simply be an “ill health” service and instead bends to think about prevention and reducing health inequalities. Many ICSs are keen to develop this role and bring together the organisations they represent – across both the NHS and local authorities –to work collaboratively on this. But with resources and time limited, they may need to concentrate their efforts on particular areas. The second wave of covid – and the prospect of widespread vaccination starting within weeks - has added a new dimension to this with an urgent need to reduce the pressure covid places on the NHS and on normal life in general. This webinar will ask: has covid helped focus the NHS’s eyes on prevention? where are the “easy wins” for ICSs where interventions are most likely to have significant results within a reasonable timeframe? what key steps do ICSs need to take to get the maximum benefit from these? How can they build common purpose among their members to ensure these happen? how can public health be made “business as usual” for everyone working in the NHS – including those in hospitals? how can ICSs balance the preventative interventions which deliver short-term benefits with those which take longer to offer a “return on investment”? Register
  4. News Article
    Rachel Hardeman has dedicated her career to fighting racism and the harm it has inflicted on the health of Black Americans. As a reproductive health equity researcher, she has been especially disturbed by the disproportionately high mortality rates for Black babies. In an effort to find some of the reasons behind the high death rates, Hardeman, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, and three other researchers combed through the records of 1.8 million Florida hospital births between 1992 and 2015 looking for clues. They found a tantalising statistic. Although Black newborns are three times as likely to die as White newborns, when Black babies are delivered by Black doctors, their mortality rate is cut in half. "Strikingly, these effects appear to manifest more strongly in more complicated cases," the researchers wrote, "and when hospitals deliver more Black newborns." They found no similar relationship between White doctors and White births. Nor did they find a difference in maternal death rates when the doctor's race was the same as the patient's. Read full story Research paper Source: The Washington Post, 9 January 2021
  5. News Article
    The Becker's Clinical Leadership & Infection Control editorial team chose the top 10 patient safety issues for healthcare leaders to prioritise in 2021, presented below in no particular order, based on news, study findings and trends reported in the past year. COVID-19 Healthcare staffing shortages Missed and delayed diagnoses Drug and medicine supply shortages Low vaccination coverage and disease resurgance Clinical burnout Health equity Healthcare-associated infections Surgical mistakes Standardising safety efforts. Read full story Source: Becker's Healthcare, 30 December 2020
  6. Event
    until
    This free online event from the King's Fund will provide insight into the wider UK health and care landscape in 2021 and will explore how recent trends, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and future developments could affect people working in the sector, patients and the wider population. The speakers will discuss some of the big issues that we hope to see progress on in 2021, including health and care staff wellbeing, social care reform, population health and health inequalities, and legislative changes to support the integration agenda. Register
  7. News Article
    Pre-existing social inequalities contributed to the UK recording the highest death rates from Covid in Europe, a leading authority on public health has said, warning that many children’s lives would be permanently blighted if the problem is not tackled. Sir Michael Marmot, known for his landmark work on the social determinants of health, argued in a new report that families at the bottom of the social and economic scale were missing out before the pandemic, and were now suffering even more, losing health, jobs, lives and educational opportunities. In the report, Build Back Fairer, Marmot said these social inequalities must be addressed whatever the cost and it was not enough to revert to how things before the pandemic. “We can’t afford not to do it,” he said. Read full story Source: The Guardian, 15 December 2020
  8. News Article
    Throughout the pandemic, people with learning disabilities and autism have consistently been let down. A lack of clear, easy-to-understand guidance, unequal access to care and illegal “do not resuscitate” instructions have exacerbated the inequalities many people have long faced. It is crucial we do not forget those who have constantly been at the back of the queue: people with learning disabilities and autism. The impact cannot be ignored: research shows that 76% of people with learning disabilities feel they do not matter to the government, compared with the general public, during the pandemic. And data shows the danger of contracting COVID-19 for people with learning disabilities and autism is much higher than for the wider population. Public Health England has said the registered COVID-19 death rate for people with learning disabilities in England is more than four times times higher than the general population. But experts estimate the true rate is likely to be even higher, since not all deaths of people with learning disabilities are registered in the databases used to collate the findings. The reasons the pandemic has impacted people with learning disabilities so disproportionately are systemic, and a result of inequalities in healthcare services experienced for generations. Yes, some individuals are more clinically vulnerable, on account of the co-morbidities and complications associated with their learning disability. For many people, however, poorer outcomes after contracting the virus are due to non-clinical issues and inequalities in accessing healthcare services. This is inexcusable. The government must prioritise vaccinations for the 1.5 million people with learning disabilities and 700,000 with autism. Putting this long-overlooked group at the top of the vaccine queue would help address the systemic health inequalities learning disabled people face. Read full story Source: The Guardian, 15 December 2020
  9. News Article
    Health checks should be offered to people from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds from the age of 25, a report has recommended. MPs examined the disproportionate impact of the Covid pandemic on people from black and Asian backgrounds. They said NHS checks, currently available to 40-70-year-olds in England, could pick up conditions which are linked to severe coronavirus. The role of inequalities in employment and housing was also emphasised. The report, produced by the Women and Equalities Committee, said the government should act to tackle these wider causes of poor health. The committee heard evidence during the course of its investigation that showed 63% of healthcare workers who died after contracting the virus had come from black, Asian or other ethnic minority backgrounds. And during the first peak of the virus, data from the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre showed 34% of coronavirus patients in ICUs were from an ethnic minority background, whereas they made up 12% of viral pneumonia admissions. Office for National Statistics (ONS) data has also shown that black people were almost twice as likely to die from Covid-19 as white people, with those of Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnicity about 1.7 times as likely. The report raised concerns the pandemic was entrenching "existing health inequalities". Read full story Source: BBC News, 15December 2020
  10. Content Article
    In this BMJ Opinion piece, Amali Lokugamage and Alice Meredith propose that the foundation of any translation of Cultural Safety education to maternity services should consider these five key ingredients: A catalogue of patient experience videos explaining their encounters with structural inequity in healthcare from a diverse group of patients The creation of a basic module of education in decolonising the history of health, raising awareness of lingering colonial racial bias An educational tool is required to enhance healthcare professional’s reflective practice Access to continuity of care models for disadvantaged women Part of the Cultural Safety model is that when vulnerable patients feel culturally unsafe (due to racial discrimination), they can request carers from a similar ethnic background as themselves. In relation to the final point, the authors note: "There may not be enough numbers of appropriately trained personnel from the same cultural background requiring affirmative action in recruitment. An additional confounding consequence may be to cause “auto segregation” in society and could limit personal development in all healthcare personnel or systems in order to produce equitable healthcare for all. Also, the global phenomenon of disrespectful maternity care, described by the World Health Organisation in their document on the prevention and elimination of disrespect and abuse during childbirth, points to the existence of unjust interactions in countries where care is delivered by professionals from a similar background to their patients. Furthermore, by potentially allowing such requests to become day-to-day practice, there are recognised pitfalls as described recently by Roger Kline, including increased segregation towards healthcare providers, and even racism against doctors from ethnic minorities. So, this final element could be thorny when considering possible translation to a UK setting."
  11. News Article
    People with learning disabilities have been "at the back of the queue" during the coronavirus pandemic, a panel of MPs has been told. Those living in supported accommodation were left waiting weeks for guidance on testing and visits. MPs were also told long-term social factors were likely to be more important than biology when it came to ethnic divides in the virus's impact. The panel focused on what lessons could be learned. Read full story Source: BBC News, 1 December 2020
  12. Content Article
    What will the Observatory aim to do? It will seek to achieve not only equality of access to services, but equal health outcomes irrespective of race. While discussions as to its functions and structure have only just begun, the Observatory’s aims are clear, and build on lessons of successes and failure from the past. It will provide a unified source of policy relevant evidence and information which would explain how and why racial disparities in health occur. While the evidence would be principally aimed at enhancing the knowledge and understanding of healthcare leaders, its outputs are intended to be publicly accessible. target outcomes, by translating the research into practical guidance, so that new and existing policy and programmes are renewed, designed and delivered to reduce disparities and begin with reviewing the impact of policy practice and programmes on the health and wellbeing of the ethnic minority health workforce, in collaboration with NHS England’s Workforce Race Equality Strategy. Eliminating the adverse outcomes of racism and discrimination in the NHS’s own workforce is not optional, if the Observatory is to be a credible authority in race equality into the future.
  13. Event
    until
    The institution of medicine has always excluded women. From ancient beliefs that the womb wandered through the body causing 'humours' to 19th century Freudian hysteria, female bodies have been marked as unruly, defective, and lesser. We are still feeling the effects of these beliefs today. In 2008, a study of over 16,000 images in anatomy textbooks found that the white, heterosexual male was presented as the ‘universal model’ of a human being. We see this play out in medical research, when it isn't considered necessary to include women's experiences: approximately 70% of people who experience chronic pain are women, and yet 80% of pain study participants are men or male rats. We also see these beliefs inform clinical decisions. When experiencing pain, women are more likely to be given sedatives than painkillers, in a nod to the stereotype that women are more emotional and are therefore probably exaggerating the nature of their pain. This phenomenon is known as the gender pain gap, which describes the disparities in medical care that men and women receive purely due to their gender. But while awareness has risen over the last few years, how close are we to really closing the gender pain gap? Join The Femedic and Hysterical Women in discussion with Dr Omon Imohi, Dr Hannah Short, and research charity Wellbeing of Women as we consider how far medicine has come and how far we still have to go. Register
  14. Event
    until
    The advancing mental health equalities strategy published in September 2020 outlines the core enabling actions NHS England and NHS Improvement will take with the support of the Advancing Mental Health Equalities Taskforce – an alliance of sector experts, including patients and carers, who are committed to creating more equitable access, experience and outcomes in mental health services in England. It sits alongside the NHS Mental Health Implementation Plan 2019/20–2023/24 and as such is similarly focused in scope. This strategy is also an important element of the overall NHS plans to accelerate action to address health inequalities in the next stage of responding to COVID-19. This webinar lead by Dr Jacqui Dyer MBE will introduce advancing mental health equalities strategy and summarise the core actions that NHS England and NHS Improvement will take to bridge the gaps for communities fairing worse than others in mental health services. Register
  15. Event
    This Westminster Health Forum conference will discuss the priorities for improving the health outcomes in babies and young children and the next steps for policy. It is taking place as The Rt Hon Andrea Leadsom MP, Government's Early Years Health Adviser - who is a keynote speaker at this conference - leads a review into improving health outcomes in babies and young children as part of the Government’s levelling up policy agenda. With the first phase of the review expected in early 2021, this conference will be an opportunity for stakeholders to discuss the priorities and latest thinking on improving health outcomes. The discussion is bringing together stakeholders with key policy officials who are due to attend from DHSC and the DfE. The agenda: The priorities for improving health outcomes for babies and young children. Understanding the importance of the first 1,000 days in child development' Improving child public health, reducing inequalities and the impact of social adversity in childhood. Identifying measures for supporting vulnerable and disadvantaged young children and families - and learning from the COVID-19 pandemic. Priorities for system-wide collaboration to address underlying health inequalities and key opportunities for improving health outcomes in young children going forward. Next steps for the commissioning of health services for children in the early stages of life. Improving health outcomes for young children across health and care - integrating services, care pathways, workforce training, and partnership working. Register
  16. News Article
    Older women could be less likely to receive ovarian cancer treatment. A new report analysed data from more than 17,000 cases of ovarian cancer diagnosed across England between 2016 and 2018. Three in five (60%) of women with ovarian cancer over the age of 79 did not receive either chemotherapy or surgery, while 37% of women over the age of 70 did not receive any treatment. The nature of ovarian cancer means surgery is essential in the large majority of cases to remove the tumour. The researchers cautioned that with an ageing population it is vital that women of all ages have access to the best possible treatments. Researchers also examined the various rates of treatments for ovarian cancer among women in different parts of England. They found the probability of receiving any treatment fell below the average in the East Midlands, the East of England, Greater Manchester and Kent and Medway. The report was jointly funded by The British Gynaecological Cancer Society, Ovarian Cancer Action, Target Ovarian Cancer and delivered by analysts at the National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service. Commenting on the report, Cary Wakefield, chief executive of Ovarian Cancer Action, said: "Neither your age nor location should decide your chance of survival if you are diagnosed with ovarian cancer." "Our audit is the first step in addressing the health inequalities women across England face, so we can begin to dismantle them." Read full story Source: The Independent, 11 November 2020
×