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Found 39 results
  1. Content Article
    WHO's definition of an After Action Review and resources Guidance for After Action Review After Action Review infographic 3 minute video explaining the AAR practice as promoted by WHO, including the definition, the different methodologies and available resources. After Action Reviews and simulation exercises
  2. News Article
    A qualitative study of Twitter hashtags revealed power hierarchies can damage the patient experience and clinician relationship. In an analysis of a popular Twitter hashtag, researchers found that patients largely take umbrage when they feel their doctor does not believe their ailment or knowledge about their healthcare, and when they perceive a power hierarchy between themselves and their clinician. Although not as many patients are using Twitter to get peer feedback on certain providers (the Binary Fountain poll showed only 21% of patients do this), the social media website still holds a lot of power, researchers from the University of California system explained. Twitter is a large platform that hosts social discourse. Healthcare professionals use Twitter to disseminate public health and patient education messages and to network, while 61% of patients use Twitter to learn more about their health, as well. Read full article Source: Patient Engagement HIT, 29 October 2020
  3. Content Article
    A sequential qualitative method study was conducted and integrated with the quantitative study performed by Matos, Weits, and van Hunsel to complete a mixed method study. The qualitative phase expands the understanding of the quantitative results from a previous study by broadening the knowledge on external barriers and internal barriers that patient organizations face when implementing PV activities. The strategies to stimulate patient-organisation participation are the creation of more awareness campaigns, more research that creates awareness, education for patient organisations, communication of real PV examples, creation of a targeted PV system, creation of a PV communication network that provides feedback to patients, improvement of understanding of all stakeholders, and a more proactive approach from national competent authorities. Both study phases show congruent results regarding patients’ involvement and the activities patient organisations perform to promote drug safety. Patient organisations progressively position themselves as stakeholders in PV, carrying out many activities that stimulate awareness and participation of their members in drug safety, but still face internal and external barriers that can hamper their involvement.
  4. Content Article
    This was an explorative study, with qualitative in-depth interviews of 23 family carers of older people with suspected or diagnosed dementia. Family carers participated after receiving information primarily through health professionals working in dementia care. A semi-structured topic guide was used in a flexible way to capture participants’ experiences. A four-step inductive analysis of the transcripts was informed by hermeneutic-phenomenological analysis.
  5. News Article
    Looking to improve practice through learning Errors, mishaps and misunderstandings are surprisingly common in medicine and around one in 10 patients suffer avoidable harm, impacting on patients, their families, health care organisations, staff and students. However a research project seeking to improve patient safety across Europe, led by Newcastle-based Northumbria University, has received international acclaim as it looks to improve practice through learning. The SLIPPS (Shared Learning from Practice to improve Patient Safety) project is Co-funded by the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union, and is led by Professor Alison Steven, a Reader in Health Professions Education at Northumbria University. Professor Steven has a longstanding interest in the use of education to raise standards of care and ensure patient safety. Considering the rapid spread of Covid 19, she says improving patient safety and standards of care across Europe and beyond, has never been more important. Read full article here
  6. Content Article
    The results found there were 129 unique mentions of barriers to patient safety; these barriers were categorised into five major themes. ‘Limited resources’ was the most prominent theme, followed by barriers related to health systems issues, the medical culture, provider training and patient education/awareness. Although inadequate resources are likely a substantial challenge to the improvement of patient safety in India, other patient safety barriers such as health systems changes, training, and education, could be addressed with fewer resources. While initial approaches to improving patient safety in India and other low- and middle-income countries have focused on implementing processes that represent best practices, this study suggests that multifaceted interventions to also address more structural problems (such as resource constraints, systems issues, and medical culture) may be important.
  7. Content Article
    The authors conducted a qualitative interview study with 22 accident investigators from different domains in Sweden. They found a wide range of factors that led investigations away from the ideal, most which more resembled factors involved in organisational accidents, rather than reflecting flawed thinking. One particular limitation of investigation was that many investigations stop the analysis at the level of “preventable causes”, the level where remedies that were currently practical to implement could be found. This could potentially limit the usefulness of using investigations to get a view on the “big picture” of causes of accidents as a basis for further remedial actions.
  8. Content Article
    Here, Dr Sara Ryan questions whether inquiries or investigations are an effective way of holding stakeholders to account and discusses the need for more qualitative research to better understand bereaved family experiences of inquiries and investigations. Political Quarterly (1).pdf
  9. Content Article
    This framework highlights the following five dimensions, which the authors believe should be included in any safety and monitoring approach in order to give a comprehensive and rounded picture of an organisation’s safety: Past harm: this encompasses both psychological and physical measures Reliability: this is defined as ‘failure free operation over time’ and applies to measures of behaviour, processes and systems Sensitivity to operations: the information and capacity to monitor safety on an hourly or daily basis Anticipation and preparedness: the ability to anticipate, and be prepared for, problems Integration and learning: the ability to respond to, and improve from, safety information.
  10. Content Article
    Resources: driver diagrams (tree diagrams) the health and wellbeing framework and diagnostic tool workforce stress and the supportive organisation — a framework for improvement.
  11. Content Article
    Key findings: There are calls for greater use of ‘soft’ intelligence around quality and safety. Little research examines the challenges and opportunities soft data present. This study in the English NHS found clinicians and managers saw utility in soft data. Dominant approaches to interpretation risked obscuring their greatest value. Soft data might better be used to disrupt understanding and challenge consensus.
  12. Content Article
    Here you can find patient safety resources including: Mortality reports Quality reports National Patient Safety Strategy Blogs.
  13. Content Article
    Darzi Alumni, Claire Cox , who was hosted by the Kent Sussex and Surrey Academic Health Science Network, summarises the barriers and assumptions held with in the system of learning from deaths and serious incidents. 1 deaths and serious incidents.pdf
  14. Content Article
    There is an urgent need to respond to the challenges experienced by carers at the point of transition and beyond, by ensuring early and coordinated planning, effective information sharing and communication and clear transition processes and guidelines. A person‐centred and family‐centred approach is required to minimise negative impact on the health and well‐being of the young adult with intellectual disabilities and their carers.
  15. Content Article
    CARS estimates the risk of death following emergency admission to medical wards using routinely collected vital signs and blood test data. The aim of the study was to elicit the views of: Healthcare practitioners (staff) and service users and carers on the potential value, unintended consequences and concerns associated with CARS. Practitioner views on the issues to consider before embedding CARS into routine practice.
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