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Found 36 results
  1. News Article
    England’s poorest people get worse NHS care than its wealthiest citizens, including longer waiting for A&E treatment and worse experience of GP services, a new study has shown. Those from the most deprived areas have fewer hip replacements and are admitted to hospital with bed sores more often than people from the least deprived areas. With regard to emergency care, 14.3% of the most deprived had to wait more than the supposed maximum of four hours to be dealt with in A&E in 2017-18, compared with 12.8% of the wealthiest. Similarly, just 64% of the former had a good experience making a GP appointment, compared with 72% of those from the richest areas. Research by the Nuffield Trust and Health Foundation thinktanks found that the poorest people were less likely to recover from mental ill-health after receiving psychological therapy and be readmitted to hospital as a medical emergency soon after undergoing treatment. The findings sparked concern because they show that poorer people’s health risks being compounded by poorer access to NHS care. Read full story Source: The Guardian, 23 January 2020
  2. News Article
    The partner of a dying man was denied the chance to be at his bedside during his final moments after a hospital wrongly banned her from daily visits, an ombudsman report has found. Brian Boulton, 70, was admitted to Royal Gwent Hospital in Newport, South Wales, after suffering from a chest infection, which was later diagnosed as aspiration pneumonia caused by oesophageal cancer. Celia Jones, his “long term life partner” of twenty years, was accused by hospital staff of giving the retired tailor a larger dose of the prescribed furosemide medication than was allowed. Ms Jones, 65, was restricted to one-hour visits twice a week, meaning she was unable to be with him when he died a day after her last authorised visit on Wednesday 27 September 2017. The Public Services Ombudsman for Wales has upheld her complaints about her “appalling” treatment, ruling that the visiting restrictions were imposed “without warning” and resulted in a “significant injustice”. It found no record of Ms Jones, a retired nurse, admitting to a senior ward manager that she gave the large dose of medicine to her partner. Read full story Source: The Telegraph, 6 January 2020
  3. Content Article
    Based on the author, Bonnie Friedman's own experiences, Hospital Warrior lays out in direct, simple terms hard-learned and time-tested tactics to help ensure a loved one's medical needs are met. Hospital Warrior also includes checklists and interviews with doctors and other healthcare professionals who provide essential tips and advice for the reader. Bonnie Friedman is passionate about hospital healthcare. Her expertise is hard-won, based on more than 24 years of advocating for her husband through 14 separate hospitalisations – some fairly routine, some quite dramatic and some truly life-and-death experiences.
  4. Content Article
    The following four initiatives were selected to receive the HQCA’s 2019 Patient Experience Awards: NowICU Project, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), Misericordia Community Hospital Rapid Access, Patient Focused Biopsy Clinic; Head and Neck Surgery, Pathology; University of Alberta Hospital Edmonton Prostate Interdisciplinary Cancer Clinic (EPICC), Northern Alberta Urology Centre Transitional Pain Service, South Health Campus Take a look at their presentations and find out more about these great initiatives.
  5. Content Article
    The ThinkSAFE Logbook has four sections: Information about you. How you can help enhance your safety in hospital. Information and notes about your care. Other useful information for patients and families. The Logbook also includes a number of useful tools, tips and prompts to help you and the healthcare staff caring for you to share information. This will help you to be involved and informed about your care and treatment. The pages are ordered so that when they are printed double-sided they create an A5 booklet. Once printed, the pages can be folded and then either stapled down the fold to create a soft cover booklet, or hole-punched to fit inside an A5 ring-binder folder.
  6. Content Article
    The project ThinkSAFE helps staff, patients and their families to co-operate and improve patient safety. This film is shown at the patient’s bedside and covers: how patients can make changes to their behaviour to improve safety suggested actions that patients can take possible barriers to involving patients in improving their safety.
  7. Content Article
    Key findings: Though PPI is increasingly common in healthcare research, there is limited agreement about how, when, and why it should best be done. Patients and the public get involved in research for a variety of reasons but often because they want to help others and contribute to a better healthcare system. To enable involvement, PPI needs to be funded adequately, opportunities need to be clearly communicated, and support needs to be available for researchers and PPI contributors. More PPI on its own doesn’t necessarily mean better research, and doing PPI just for the sake of it can discourage researchers and disenfranchise people who get involved. PPI should be relevant and meaningful for the research and the people involved. PPI has the potential to improve research and empower contributors, but evidence about how that actually happens, to what extent, and to what effect, is limited. To monitor and evaluate PPI, researchers will need to agree on what study designs are appropriate, be clear about what PPI activities are meant to achieve, and focus evaluations on the process of PPI and/or its contributions to research.
  8. Content Article
    Picker Institute Europe reviewed the quality of patient engagement in primary care, how to measure it, and developments in patient involvement in primary care. Part of this paper considered three examples of notable practice in involving patients in the development of their general practice services. These were not selected because they were ‘typical’ but because they demonstrated, in some depth, a variety of approaches to patient involvement. The first example looked at two health centres with patient forums. One forum was more formal, with designated officers and control of the agendas and conduct of meetings. The other opted for a looser, less formal approach, as a ‘friend’ of the centre. The second example looked at a practice-based commissioning structure that was strongly guided by the Primary Care Trust and was trying to unite existing and new practice representatives into a new and dynamic network. The final example looked at a different kind of consortium, driven more by the practices themselves, in which patient representatives were integral and essential to the decision-making process. It was also looking to broaden its constituency with an area-wide health forum.
  9. Content Article
    This report looks at factors affecting patient engagement, potential solutions and practical next steps. Suggested strategies to enhance patient engagement for safer primary care include: educating health care providers about patient engagement supporting patients to become actively involved broadening the ways in which patients are involved recognising the importance of communities providing an enabling and supportive environment.
  10. Content Article
    Involving patients in improving safety states that supporting patient involvement in safety improvement will not solve all the safety issues in the NHS, nor does it negate the responsibility of health systems and professionals to provide safe care. However, involving patients and carers can be an important component of broader strategies. It highlights that, as patients come to be seen and treated as partners in their care, there is significant potential to make real gains in patient safety. Main approaches identified to involving patients in safety improvement Collecting feedback retrospectively. Asking patients to help plan broad service change. Encouraging patients to help identify risks when they are receiving care.
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