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Found 52 results
  1. News Article
    More women may suffer pain due to being conscious while undergoing caesareans or other pregnancy-related surgery under general anaesthetic than realised, a troubling new study has found. The report, conducted by medical journal Anaesthesia, found being awake while having a caesarean is far more common than it is with other types of surgery. Researchers discovered that one in 256 women going through pregnancy-related surgery are aware of what was going on — a far higher proportion than the one in every 19,000 identified in a previous national audit. If a patient is conscious at some point while under general anaesthetic, they may be able to recall events from the surgery such as pain or the sensation of being trapped, the researchers said. While the experiences generally only last for a few seconds or minutes, anaesthetists remain highly concerned. Women also felt tugging, stitching, feelings of dissociation and not being able to breathe - with some suffering long-term psychological damage that often involved characteristics of post-traumatic stress disorder. Read full story Source: The Independent, 13 January 2021
  2. News Article
    Women are undergoing “painful and distressing” diagnostic tests as doctors use the COVID-19 pandemic as an excuse not to offer them their choice of pain relief, HSJ has been told. At least 70 women who have had hysteroscopies this year in English NHS hospitals said they were left in extreme pain following the procedures, with many suffering trauma for several days, according to a survey by the Campaign Against Painful Hysteroscopies group. Some women claimed doctors used COVID-19 as an “excuse” not to offer sedation or general anaesthetic. Others said they were offered an inpatient appointment with general anaesthetic, but were also told it would be a long wait and would likely be cancelled due to covid pressures. Women also said they were told an outpatient procedure would reduce the time spent in hospital and consequently reduce the risk of contracting covid. The only pain relief on offer was often just ibuprofen and some women said facilities like recovery rooms were unavailable. The vast majority of the women surveyed — more than 90% — said they were traumatised for a day or longer by the pain from the procedure, A RCOG spokeswoman said: “We are concerned to hear that women are going through painful and distressing hysteroscopy procedures and that they feel COVID-19 is being used as an excuse not to offer a choice of anaesthetic." “The covid-19 pandemic has put incredible strain on the health services, and the risk of transmission of the virus has meant they’ve had to adapt their procedures. Whilst all women should be offered a choice of anaesthesia and treatment settings for hysteroscopic procedures, an outpatient setting avoids hospital admission and reduces the risk of exposure to the virus." “The RCOG guidance on this is very clear — all pain relief options should be discussed with women, as well as the risks and benefits of each. Women should be given the choice of a local or general anaesthetic. If the procedure is still too painful, no matter what anaesthetic options are chosen, it must be stopped and a further discussion of pain relief options should then take place. It’s vital that women are listened to and their choice is fully supported.” Read full story Source: HSJ, 21 December 2020
  3. Event
    Dr Donna Prosser, Chief Clinical Officer at the Patient Safety Movement Foundation, is joined by a group of experts, including pharmacists, anesthesiologists, respiratory therapists, family members, and nursing leaders, to explore the patient safety priorities of sedation, opioid therapy and respiratory depression. The group will discuss frequently encountered safety issues, explore organisational processes to reduce sedation safety events, and assess the role patients and family members can play in reducing harm. Register
  4. Content Article
    As an additional option to the text below, you might like to watch the following video from Stephanie O'Donohue, Content and Engagement Manager of Patient Safety Learning's the hub: Sharing patients’ experiences on the hub In February this year, we heard from the Campaign Against Painful Hysteroscopy (CAPH) about the high numbers of women experiencing painful hysteroscopies. This prompted us to start a new Community discussion on our patient safety platform, the hub, titled ‘Painful hysteroscopy’, asking members to share their experiences with us. This has, by far, been the most popular discussion on the hub. To date, there have been close to 100 comments made, over 30 members have contributed to the discussion, and the conversation itself has received nearly 6,000 page views, with people viewing the discussion daily. Engaging with patients, clinicians, researchers and leaders Through our contact with CAPH and hearing from patients, clinicians and researchers on the hub, we’ve identified the main patient safety issues to be around consent, access to pain relief and implementation of guidance. Since identifying these issues, we have written to key political stakeholders, including Nadine Dorries MP, Minister for Patient Safety, Suicide Prevention and Mental Health, and Jeremy Hunt MP, Chair of the Health and Social Care Select Committee. More recently, we have made a request for data from the National Reporting and Learning System (the central NHS database for patient safety incident reports) to understand whether the experiences we are hearing about are being accurately captured. We believe patients’ experiences of hysteroscopy should be proactively gathered and used to evidence and inform improvements. Looking forward In 2021, we will continue calling for patients’ experiences of hysteroscopy, and their concerns about this procedure, to be heard and responded to. We want to see systems put in place to support patient safety, and evidence-based conversations occurring between clinicians and patients before procedures take place. These conversations should aim to ensure patients are well-informed of the benefits, risks and alternatives of the procedure, as well as what impact it will have on them if they choose not to proceed. You can read more about the action we believe is needed to address the patient safety issues around painful hysteroscopies.
  5. Content Article
    In 2012, the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority published an analysis of surgical fires reported through its database for the primary purpose of determining whether surgical fires continued to be a problem. In 2018, the Authority published an update, including analysis of events reported from 1 July 2011 through to 30 June 2016. The model suggests a 71% decrease in the patient risk of surgical fires from 2005 to 2016. The analysts noted that in 2005, there was about one surgical fire per month in Pennsylvania, and, if the downward trend continues, the rate will be only one surgical fire per year in 2032.
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