Jump to content

Search the hub

Showing results for tags 'Evaluation'.


More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Start to type the tag you want to use, then select from the list.

  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • All
    • Commissioning, service provision and innovation in health and care
    • Coronavirus (COVID-19)
    • Culture
    • Improving patient safety
    • Investigations, risk management and legal issues
    • Leadership for patient safety
    • Organisations linked to patient safety (UK and beyond)
    • Patient engagement
    • Patient safety in health and care
    • Patient Safety Learning
    • Professionalising patient safety
    • Research, data and insight
    • Miscellaneous

Categories

  • Commissioning, service provision and innovation in health and care
    • Commissioning and funding patient safety
    • Digital health and care service provision
    • Health records and plans
    • Innovation programmes in health and care
  • Coronavirus (COVID-19)
    • Blogs
    • Data, research and statistics
    • Frontline insights during the pandemic
    • Good practice and useful resources
    • Guidance
    • Mental health
    • Exit strategies
    • Patient recovery
  • Culture
    • Bullying and fear
    • Good practice
    • Occupational health and safety
    • Safety culture programmes
    • Second victim
    • Speak Up Guardians
    • Staff safety
    • Whistle blowing
  • Improving patient safety
    • Clinical governance and audits
    • Design for safety
    • Disasters averted/near misses
    • Equipment and facilities
    • Error traps
    • Human factors (improving human performance in care delivery)
    • Improving systems of care
    • Implementation of improvements
    • Safety stories
    • Stories from the front line
    • Workforce and resources
  • Investigations, risk management and legal issues
  • Leadership for patient safety
  • Organisations linked to patient safety (UK and beyond)
  • Patient engagement
  • Patient safety in health and care
  • Patient Safety Learning
  • Professionalising patient safety
  • Research, data and insight
  • Miscellaneous

News

  • News

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start
    End

Last updated

  • Start
    End

Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


First name


Last name


Country


About me


Organisation


Role

Found 28 results
  1. Content Article
    Quality of care before the pandemic The care that people received in 2019/20 was mostly of good quality However, while quality was largely maintained compared with the previous year, there was no improvement overall Before the arrival of the coronavirus pandemic, we remained concerned about a number of issues: the poorer quality of care that is harder to plan for the need for care to be delivered in a more joined-up way the continued fragility of adult social care provision the struggles of the poorest services to make any improvement significant gaps in access to good quality care, especially mental health care persistent inequalities in some aspects of care The impact of the coronavirus pandemic As the pandemic gathered pace, health and care staff across all roles and services showed resilience under unprecedented pressures and adapted quickly to work in different ways to keep people safe. In hospitals and care homes, staff worked long hours in difficult circumstances to care for people who were very sick with COVID-19 and, despite their efforts to protect people, tragically they saw many of those they cared for die. Some staff also had to deal with the loss of colleagues to COVID. A key challenge for providers has been maintaining a safe environment – managing the need to socially distance or isolate people due to COVID-19. Good infection prevention and control practice has been vital. The crisis has accelerated innovation that had previously proved difficult to mainstream, such as GP practices moving rapidly to remote consultations. The changes have proved beneficial to, and popular with, many. But many of these innovations exclude people who do not have good digital access, and some have been rushed into place during the pandemic. The pandemic has had a major impact on elective care and urgent services such as cancer and cardiac services, and there is huge pent-up demand for care and treatment that has been postponed. The pandemic is having a disproportionate effect on some groups of people, and is shining a light on existing inequality in the health and social care system. It is vital that we understand how we can use this knowledge to move towards fairer and more equitable care, where nobody’s needs go unmet. It is important that the learning and innovation that has been seen during the pandemic is used to develop health and social care for the future. New approaches to care, developed in response to the pandemic and shown to have potential, must be fully evaluated before they become established practice.
  2. News Article
    The Health Research Authority has launched a new strategy to ensure information about all health and social care research – including COVID-19 research - is made publicly available to benefit patients, researchers and policy makers. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of sharing details of research taking place - to understand the virus and find the tests, treatments and vaccines - so that results can inform best quality care and preventive measures. This also means researchers do not duplicate efforts and can build on each other’s work while the public can see what research is going on. Now the new Make it Public strategy aims to build on this good practice and make it easy for researchers to be transparent about their work. The strategy, delivered by the HRA in partnership with NHS Research Scotland (NRS), Health and Care Research Wales and Health and Social Care Northern Ireland, is about making transparency ‘the norm’ in research and making information more visible to the public. New measures set out in the strategy – will improve transparency and openness in health and social care studies, by: expecting researchers to plan how they will let research participants know about the findings of the study from the beginning introducing additional monitoring to check that researchers are reporting results and to collect information about study findings making information on individual research projects – and their transparency performance - available to the public introducing a system to consider past transparency performance when reviewing new studies for approval and in the future introducing sanctions.
  3. News Article
    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved convalescent plasma for emergency use in hospital patients with COVID-19. The announcement on 23 August said that the FDA had concluded that plasma from recovered patients “may be effective” in treating the virus and that the “potential benefits of the product outweigh the known and potential risks.” The move came despite the absence of results from randomised controlled trials, with only a preprint paper on the effects on hospitalised COVID-19 patients being published to date. Experts have warned that although these early findings show promise there is not enough evidence to show that it works. Plasma from recovered patients was approved on a case by case basis by the FDA for people critically ill with COVID-19 in March. Since then more than 70 000 patients have been treated with plasma. Emergency use approval allows clinicians to use unapproved medical products to diagnose, treat, or prevent serious or life threatening diseases or conditions when there are no adequate, approved, and available alternatives. The FDA’s commissioner, Stephen Hahn, said, “I am committed to releasing safe and potentially helpful treatments for covid-19 as quickly as possible in order to save lives. We’re encouraged by the early promising data that we’ve seen about convalescent plasma. The data from studies conducted this year shows that plasma from patients who’ve recovered from covid-19 has the potential to help treat those who are suffering from the effects of getting this terrible virus.” But Martin Landray, professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of Oxford and lead researcher for the RECOVERY trial, which is comparing treatments for COVID-19, including convalescent plasma for hospital patients, urged caution. He said, “There is a huge gap between theory and proven benefit. That is why randomised clinical trials are so important. At present, we simply don’t know if it works." Read full story Source: BMJ, 25 August 2020
  4. Content Article
    This study highlights that people with complex concerns with a history of placement breakdowns and past institutionalisation can be settled successfully and safely in local communities. However, it is difficult for many of them to achieve a satisfactory quality of life long term. The obligation for this lies with service providers to provide adequate support to overcome that difficulty.
  5. Content Article
    The study notes that long-term conditions are often not recorded on administrative data and the lack of recording may be worse for weekend admissions. Studies of the weekend effect that rely on administrative data might have underestimated the health burden of patients, particularly if admitted at the weekend.
  6. Content Article
    The report concludes that rounds are a ‘slow intervention’ that develop their impact over time. They create a safe, reflective space for staff to talk together confidentially, and attending rounds increased staff’s empathy and compassion for colleagues and patients, supported them in their work and helped them to make changes in practice. The analysis highlights the necessary conditions for rounds to work.
  7. Content Article
    All studies reviewed arose in high-income settings, demonstrating the need for studies on frontline clinical leadership development in low-and middle-income settings. Clinical leadership development is an ongoing process and must target both novice and veteran frontline healthcare providers. The content of clinical leadership development interventions must encompass a holistic conceptualization of clinical leadership, and should use work-based learning, and team-based approaches, to improve clinical leadership competencies of frontline healthcare providers, and overall service delivery.
  8. Content Article
    Highlights of the paper: Principles of mindful organising are operationalised in a Mindful Governance model. The model is grounded in two cases studies in contrasting aviation organisations. The case studies led to the development of three prototype web applications.
  9. News Article
    The NHS could have prevented “chaos and panic” had the system not been left wholly unprepared for the pandemic, the editor of the BMJ has said. Numerous warnings were issued but these were not heeded, Richard Horton wrote in the Lancet. He cited an example from his journal on 20 January, pointing to a global epidemic: “Preparedness plans should be readied for deployment at short notice, including securing supply chains of pharmaceuticals, personal protective equipment, hospital supplies and the necessary human resources to deal with the consequences of a global outbreak of this magnitude.” Horton wrote that the government’s Contain-Delay-Mitigate-Research plan had failed. “It failed, in part, because ministers didn’t follow WHO’s advice to ‘test, test, test’ every suspected case. They didn’t isolate and quarantine. They didn’t contact trace." “These basic principles of public health and infectious disease control were ignored, for reasons that remain opaque. The result has been chaos and panic across the NHS.” Read full story Source: Guardian, 28 March 2020
  10. Content Article
    Take 1-minute to self-report daily, even if you are well. Help scientists identify: high-risk areas in the UK who is most at risk, by better understanding symptoms linked to underlying health conditions how fast the virus is spreading in your area.
  11. Content Article
    This document is a demonstration of Virgin Care’s commitment to providing the best quality community healthcare services to citizens in North Kent. Quality Accounts are an opportunity for an organisation to take stock of what has been achieved and to look ahead at what is planned for the coming year.
  12. Content Article
    The evaluation concluded that after receiving integrated IAPT treatment patients with LTCs: reported fewer symptoms of anxiety/depression made less use of primary and secondary healthcare services will save the health system on average an estimated £1,870 per patient over a two-year period (taking into account IAPT treatment costs).
  13. Content Article
    The report shows that mortality at 30 days is twice as high in IHF compared to non-IHF. Analysis of the 2018 NHFD data indicates that there is a delay in time to surgery, as well as worse outcomes relating to post-operative mobility, delirium and length of stay. The report also found high participation levels with full participation from Welsh health boards, very high participation from English acute trusts, and high engagement from English community trusts. An impressive proportion of English mental health trusts registered, despite no previous involvement with NAIF. The submission of cases was also excellent, with almost total completion of data collection. You can download the report here. Please note you will be prompted to register your details so you can receive updates. You may skip the registration process if you prefer.
  14. Content Article
    This resource is a key output from an NIHR-funded research project called INQUIRE: improving NHS quality using internet ratings and experiences. It turns the research findings and key lessons into a practical output. It is designed to help healthcare staff interpret and respond appropriately to online feedback and use it to improve healthcare delivery.
  15. Content Article
    Key findings: Most of the care that we see across England is good quality and, overall, the quality is improving slightly. But people do not always have good experiences of care and they have told the CQC about the difficulties they face in trying to get care and support. Sometimes people don’t get the care they need until it’s too late and things have seriously worsened for them. This struggle to access care can affect anyone. Too many people find it hard to even get appointments, but the lack of access is especially worrying when it affects people who are less able to speak up for themselves – such as children and young people with mental health problems or people with a learning disability. Too often, people must chase around different care services even to access basic support. In the worst cases, people end up in crisis or with the wrong kind of care.
  16. Content Article
    Overview in numbers (2018/19) 12 national investigations launched. 440 maternity referrals received. 100 safety awareness notifications submitted for national investigations. 127 investigators trained. 174 members of staff recruited.
  17. Content Article
    Fact 1: One in every 10 patients is harmed while receiving hospital care Fact 2: The occurrence of adverse events due to unsafe care is likely one of the 10 leading causes of death and disability across the world Fact 3: Four out of every 10 patients are harmed in primary and outpatient health care Fact 4: At least 1 out of every 7 Canadian dollars is spent treating the effects of patient harm in hospital care Fact 5: Investment in patient safety can lead to significant financial savings Fact 6: Unsafe medication practices and medication errors harm millions of patients and costs billions of US dollars every year Fact 7: Inaccurate or delayed diagnosis is one of the most common causes of patient harm and affects millions of patients Fact 8: Hospital infections affect up to 10 out of every 100 hospitalized patients Fact 9: More than 1 million patients die annually from complications due to surgery Fact 10: Medical exposure to radiation is a public health and patient safety concern
  18. Content Article
    A scoping review was undertaken to describe the availability of evidence related to care homes’ patient safety culture, what these studies focused on, and identify any knowledge gaps within the existing literature. Included papers were each reviewed by two authors for eligibility and to draw out information relevant to the scoping review. Safety culture in care homes is a topic that has not been extensively researched. The review highlights a number of key gaps in the evidence base, which future research into safety culture in care home should attempt to address.
×