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Found 16 results
  1. News Article
    The health service has been promised “whatever it needs” to deal with the coronavirus pandemic, but government spending choices reveal possible long-term changes to funding and policy. Having initially promised the health service “whatever it needs, whatever it costs” on 11th March, the government made this official when Matt Hancock issued a ministerial direction allowing the Department of Health to “spend in excess of formal Departmental Expenditure Limits”—effectively providing a blank cheque. But while the government’s actions are designed for the immediate crisis, they may be difficult to reverse once the peak of coronavirus has passed. Indeed, they could yet change how the health service operates on a permanent basis. Read full story Source: Prospect, 7 April 2020
  2. News Article
    New figures reveal that what we think we know about the Covid-19 death toll in the UK is wrong. Here’s why. Every day we get one big figure for deaths occurring in the UK. Everyone jumps on this number, taking it to be the latest toll. However NHS England figures – which currently make up the bulk of UK deaths – in fact reflect the day on which the death was reported, not the actual date of death, which is usually days, sometimes weeks, before it appears in the figures. The truth is we don’t know how many deaths have taken place the previous day. In fact the headline figure is likely to under-report the number of deaths that actually happened the previous day. The number we hear about usually counts deaths which took place at an earlier date. The difference matters because by undercounting the number of deaths we are skewing the curve. Read full story Source: Guardian, 4 April 2020
  3. News Article
    The Financial Times tracks the countries affected, the number of deaths and the economic impact of the coronavirus. Read full story Source: Financial Times, 25 March 2020
  4. News Article
    Draper & Dash, a leading predictive patient flow provider, has launched a COVID-19 live hospital planning and demand impact assessment tool. The company said it has been working around the clock to deliver its vital tool to support impact assessment. It allows trusts to view and analyse national Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data, alongside a number of live data sources on COVID-19 cases by the minute, as they emerge across the globe. The system models the impact of increased volume and complexity at a local and system level, providing visibility of ICU, theatres, and overall bed impact, and connects this live information to each trust’s clinical workforce. The tool shows immediate impacts on beds and staff under a range of selected scenarios. Read full story Source: Health Tech Newspaper, 18 March 2020
  5. Content Article
    Highlights of the paper: Principles of mindful organising are operationalised in a Mindful Governance model. The model is grounded in two cases studies in contrasting aviation organisations. The case studies led to the development of three prototype web applications.
  6. Content Article
    Previous methods of incident analysis were simply adopted and disseminated with little research into the concepts, methods, reliability and outcomes of such analyses. There is a need for significant research and investment in the development of new methods. These changes are profound and will require major adjustments in both practical and cultural terms and research to explore and evaluate the most effective approaches.
  7. Content Article
    Key points: Analysis of a national linked dataset identifying permanent care home residents aged 65 and older and their hospital found that on average during 2016/17 care home residents went to A&E 0.98 times and were admitted as an emergency 0.70 times. Emergency admissions were found to be particularly high in residential care homes compared with nursing care homes. A large number of these emergency admissions may be avoidable: 41% were for conditions that are potentially manageable, treatable or preventable outside of a hospital setting, or that could have been caused by poor care or neglect. Four evaluations of initiatives to improve health and care in care homes carried out by the Improvement Analytics Unit (IAU) in Rushcliffe, Sutton, Wakefield and Nottingham City show reductions in some measures of emergency hospital use for residents who received enhanced support. There are key learnings from these IAU evaluations, including a greater potential to reduce the need for emergency admissions and A&E attendance in residential care homes and the benefit of coproduction between health care professionals and care homes.
  8. Content Article
    The paper summarises the literature on the use of simulation with many examples of application in the field of patient safety. It explores the evidence on the impact of simulation. It goes on to suggest four areas where QI and simulation practitioners interested in closer integration of their fields might focused: Read - add articles found in quality/safety or simulation journals that integrate both fields onto your reading list. Study - seek out professional development opportunities: courses, workshops, conferences in QI methodology or simulation/debriefing. Collaborate - identify individuals in your local institution and find ways to work (and research) together. Engage - connect with the larger community of practice working on these topics via in-person meetings or platforms such as Twitter and LinkedIn.
  9. Content Article
    The use of artificial intelligence (AI) in patient care can offer significant benefits. However, there is a lack of independent evaluation considering AI in use. This paper from Sujan et al., published in BMJ Health & Care Informatics, argues that consideration should be given to how AI will be incorporated into clinical processes and services. Human factors challenges that are likely to arise at this level include cognitive aspects (automation bias and human performance), handover and communication between clinicians and AI systems, situation awareness and the impact on the interaction with patients. Human factors research should accompany the development of AI from the outset.
  10. Content Article
    The forYOU Team’s five-year experience in providing clinician support has yielded many valuable insights into this aspect of MUHC’s patient safety culture. Organisational awareness of the second victim phenomenon and an institutional response plan are critical steps in minimising the suffering of the institution’s healthcare clinicians. From this experience, the authors strongly encourage healthcare facilities to develop a comprehensive plan and provide accessible, effective support for all clinicians experiencing the second victim phenomenon.
  11. Content Article
    Nine key reasons why there should be more investment in analytical capability: Clinicians can use the insights generated by skilled analysts to improve diagnosis and disease management. National and local NHS leaders can evaluate innovations and new models of care to find out if expected changes and benefits were realised. Board members of local NHS organisations and systems can use analysis to inform changes to service delivery in complex organisations and care systems. Local NHS leaders can improve the way they manage, monitor and improve care quality day-to-day. Senior NHS decision makers can better measure and evaluate improvements and respond effectively to national incentives and regulation. Managers can make complex decisions about allocating limited resources and setting priorities for care. Local NHS leaders will gain a better understanding of how patients flow through the system. New digital tools can be developed and new data interpreted so clinicians and managers can better collaborate and use their insights to improve care. Patients and the public will be able to better use and understand health care data. Action and investment is needed across the system so the NHS has the right people with the right tools to interpret and create value from its data. This could result in an NHS that can make faster progress on improving outcomes for patients.
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