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Found 182 results
  1. Event
    until
    The Patient Safety Incident Response Framework (PSIRF) is the NHS’s approach to developing and maintaining effective systems and processes for responding to patient safety incidents and ensuring learning and improvement in patient safety. This national conference looks at the practicalities of implementing and using PSIRF. The day will provide an update on best practice in incident investigation under PSIRF and ensuring the focus is on a systems based approach to learning from patient safety incidents and delivering safety actions for improvement. The PSIRF is a contractual requirement under the NHS Standard Contract and as such is mandatory for services provided under that contract, including acute, ambulance, mental health, and community healthcare providers. This includes maternity and all specialised services. Book your place
  2. Content Article
    This article outlines a recent improvement put in place by a ward at Sir Robert Peel Community Hospital, part of University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust. The team won an award for implementing learning following a patient fall to help drastically reduce the frequency of incidents and improving patient safety.
  3. Content Article
    A new guide to innovation implementation, readiness and resourcing has been published sharing practical learning from the Health Innovation Network’s successful adoption and spread of the national Focus ADHD programme. 
  4. Content Article
    The EvidenceNOW: Advancing Heart Health in Primary Care trial was designed to assist primary care practices in the US in implementing evidence-based practices in cardiovascular care and building capacity for quality improvement. This qualitative study in BMC Primary Care aimed to gain a comprehensive understanding of perspectives from research participants and team members on the value of implementation strategies and factors that influenced the EvidenceNOW initiative in Virginia. Read a simplified research summary: Strategies for implementing large-scale quality improvement in primary care
  5. Content Article
    Health and social care standards have been widely adopted as a quality improvement intervention. Standards are typically made up of evidence-based statements that describe safe, high-quality, person-centred care as an outcome or process of care delivery. They involve stakeholders at multiple levels and multiple activities across diverse services. As such, challenges exist with their implementation. Existing literature relating to standards has focused on accreditation and regulation programmes and there is limited evidence to inform implementation strategies specifically tailored to support the implementation of standards. This systematic review aimed to identify and describe the most frequently reported enablers and barriers to implementing (inter)nationally endorsed standards, in order to inform the selection of strategies that can optimise their implementation.
  6. Content Article
    This World Health Organization (WHO) resource is for all health workers, as well as other professionals working in the field of infection prevention and control (IPC). It will help you carry out a situational analysis, track progress and understand how to make improvements to IPC at the national and facility levels, in accordance with validated WHO standards and implementation materials. All the WHO tools and resources are freely available for use by all.
  7. Event
    until
    The Patient Safety Incident Response Framework (PSIRF) sets out a new approach to learning and improving following patient safety incidents across the NHS in England. PSIRF embedding webinars will feature presentations from NHS organisations and will focus on sharing experiences, adaptions and learning as the designed systems and processes put in place prior to transition are operationalised. Recordings, slides and Q&As from our transition webinars series can be found on Future NHS alongside other workshops and supplementary materials and resources: PSIRF Presentations - NHS Patient Safety - FutureNHS Collaboration Platform Audience: Embedding webinars are open to everyone to attend, including both NHS and arm’s length bodies. Presenters: Tracey Herlihey, Head of Patient Safety Incident Response, NHS England Further speakers TBC Register
  8. Event
    until
    The Patient Safety Incident Response Framework (PSIRF) sets out a new approach to learning and improving following patient safety incidents across the NHS in England. PSIRF embedding webinars will feature presentations from NHS organisations and will focus on sharing experiences, adaptions and learning as the designed systems and processes put in place prior to transition are operationalised. Recordings, slides and Q&As from our transition webinars series can be found on Future NHS alongside other workshops and supplementary materials and resources: PSIRF Presentations - NHS Patient Safety - FutureNHS Collaboration Platform Audience: Embedding webinars are open to everyone to attend, including both NHS and arm’s length bodies. Presenters: Tracey Herlihey, Head of Patient Safety Incident Response, NHS England Further speakers TBC Register
  9. Content Article
    The scale of the health inequalities challenge can often feel daunting and overwhelming for system leaders, but tackling health inequalities is one of the four statutory purposes of integrated care systems (ICSs) to support communities to live long, healthy lives. This article outlines a project the NHS Confederation has launched to support healthcare leaders adopt best practice to address this issue.
  10. Content Article
    To improve the safety and quality of healthcare, we try to understand and improve how healthcare providers accomplish patient care "work." This work includes synthesising information from a patient's history and physical examination or from a handoff, performing tests or procedures, administering medications and providing information so that patients can make the best choices for themselves. Sometimes this work flows very well and everyone is pleased with the results, but sometimes this work does not unfold in the way that was anticipated. This article, originally published in Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory, argues that efforts to improve healthcare work will not succeed without recognising that there is a difference between a theoretical construct of "work-as-imagined" and the reality of "work-as-done".
  11. Content Article
    This is part of our series of Patient Safety Spotlight interviews, where we talk to people working for patient safety about their role and what motivates them. Jenny talks about the challenge of keeping up with and prioritising new guidance and the need to streamline recommendations to ensure they are implemented efficiently. She also discusses the importance of getting the basics, like staffing levels, right and how sea swimming has influenced how she sees patient safety.
  12. Content Article
    This is part of our series of Patient Safety Spotlight interviews, where we talk to people working for patient safety about their role and what motivates them. Tracey talks to us about how her love of applying psychology led to her role in patient safety, the importance of putting users at the centre of developing the Patient Safety Incident Response Framework (PSIRF), and what we can learn from magicians about patient safety.
  13. Content Article
    This is part of our series of Patient Safety Spotlight interviews, where we talk to people working for patient safety about their role and what motivates them. Lucy and Rebecca talk to us about their experience as Patient Safety Incident Response Framework (PSIRF) early adopters. They discuss how PSIRF puts patients at the centre of incident investigations, and the challenges and opportunities they have faced in implementing PSIRF at West Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust.
  14. Content Article
    Work to prepare for transition to working within the Patient Safety Incident Response Framework (PSIRF) in the Autumn of 2023 is well underway by healthcare providers across England. Written for all those involved in implementing PSIRF, this article describes some of the reasons behind the challenges being faced and suggests three principles to help navigate through this complex process and offers practical ideas to help.
  15. Content Article
    The number of older people having surgery is increasing. However, older patients are more likely to have complications after surgery than younger patients as they often have multiple health conditions and age-related problems such as frailty and a decline in mental ability. These factors increase the risk of surgery and can hinder recovery. Surgical pre-assessment usually focuses on the patient’s physical fitness for surgery, not the broader range of health-related factors that are important to consider in older patients. The Perioperative care for Older People undergoing Surgery (POPS) model was developed to provide a holistic assessment of an older person’s medical, physiological and functional condition prior to surgery. The assessment is then used to inform interventions that can reduce the risk of complications. The POPS model is increasingly being implemented across the English and Welsh NHS, but there are often challenges in introducing these new ways of providing care that need to be better understood. This independent study, led by THIS Institute Fellow Professor Justin Waring, outlines the key activities and strategies that are needed for the POPS model to be successfully implemented and become part of routine practice in a hospital.
  16. Content Article
    When a patient is deteriorating but no one is listening, Martha’s rule will guarantee a second opinion. Martha’s mother, Merope Mills, calls for doctors and nurses to embrace its implementation.
  17. Content Article
    Clinical trial documents are complex and may have inconsistencies, leading to potential site implementation errors and may compromise participant safety. This study characterises the frequency and type of administrative and potential patient safety interventions (PPSIs) made during the review of oncology trial documents for clinical trial implementation by centralized clinical content specialists. The study demonstrates a gap in patient safety when assessing trial documents for clinical trial implementation. One solution to address this gap is the utilisation of a centralised team of clinical specialists to preemptively review trial documents, thereby enhancing patient safety during clinical trial conduct.
  18. Content Article
    In this article for the Journal of Patient Safety, Alan Card from the Department of Pediatrics at the University of California, argues that the purpose of patient safety work is to reduce avoidable patient harm, and this requires us to slay dragons—to eliminate or at least mitigate risks to patients. He expresses the view that current practice focuses almost exclusively on investigating dragons—tracking reports on the number and type of dragons that appear, how many villagers they eat and where, whether they live in caves or forests and so on. He argues that while information about risks is useful to the extent that it informs effective action, it does nothing to make patients safer by itself: "We cannot investigate a dragon to death. No more can we risk assess our way to safer care."
  19. Content Article
    The Covid-19 pandemic had an adverse impact on the detection and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors including hypertension. In June 2022, nearly two million fewer people with hypertension were recorded as being treated to target, compared with the previous year. As a result, NHS England commissioned the AHSN Network to deliver a new national Blood Pressure Optimisation (BPO) programme building on its portfolio of work around cardiovascular disease. This report lays out: evidence about the impact of the BPO programme how it has been received by frontline staff how it has been implemented nationally.
  20. Content Article
    The idea of patient feedback as an essential tool for improving the safety of services is a familiar one. In recent years there has been a more fundamental shift towards recognising patients not just as commentators on the safety of the healthcare they experience, but as contributors to improving the safety of care. In this blog, Kate Eisenstein, Director of Strategy at the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman (PHSO) looks at the ways in which patients and their families contribute to safe care. She also highlights the fact that in many cases, their voices are still being ignored, with catastrophic consequences for individual patients and the system as a whole.
  21. Content Article
    This blog from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) looks at the importance of embedding quality control (QC) measures into everyday work. QC methods sustain improvements for the long-run and promote stable systems to produce reliable outcomes. When effectively used, they can internally monitor performance, assess progress towards goals and allow systems to direct improvement resources to where they are needed most. 
  22. Content Article
    Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) is a global problem that causes patient harm and exhaustion for healthcare teams. Despite multiple strategies proposed to overcome overcrowding, the accumulation of patients lying in bed awaiting treatment or hospitalisation is often inevitable and a major obstacle to quality of care. This study in BMJ Open Quality looked at a quality improvement project that aimed to ensure that no patients were lying in bed awaiting care or referral outside a care area. Several plan–do–study–act (PDSA) cycles were tested and implemented to achieve and maintain the goal of having zero patients waiting for care outside the ED care area. The project team introduced and adapted five rules during these cycles: No patients lying down outside of a care unit Forward movement Examination room always available Team huddle An organisation overcrowding plan The researchers found that the PDSA strategy based on these five measures removed in-house obstacles to the internal flow of patients and helped avoid them being outside the care area. These measures are easily replicable by other management teams.
  23. Content Article
    The Health and Safety (Sharp Instruments in Healthcare) Regulations 2013 aimed to: minimise burdens on public, independent and third sector employers and ensure businesses in UK are not placed at competitive disadvantage relative to EU counterparts offer good standards of protection to healthcare workers from risk of sharps injury at work see a fall in sharps injury numbers. This post implementation review (PIR) aimed to assess the success of these objectives. It found that: stakeholder consultation provided evidence of the increasing use of safer sharps across all healthcare sectors. evidence from RCN research and HSE inspections indicates that risks to healthcare workers from sharps injuries remains high. The policy conclusion from this evidence is that the Regulations are still required, and that the Regulations’ objectives cannot be met with a system that imposes less burden to business.
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