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Found 46 results
  1. News Article
    In the largest independent randomized controlled trial (RCT) of its type, a multimodal digital therapy program for patients with non-specific chronic low back pain has outperformed standard-of-care treatment across all medical outcomes. Results of the study, published in the Journal of Pain Research, show that patients using Kaia, the back pain management app developed by leading digital therapeutics company Kaia Health, reduced pain levels, anxiety, depression, stress, and improved wellbeing and body functionality significantly more compared to standard-of-care treatments, e.g. pain killers, surgeries, physical therapy. “This large-scale study demonstrates the significant benefits for people managing low back pain when using Kaia to deliver a multimodal treatment through a digital device, such as a smartphone,” says Thomas R. Toelle, M.D., Ph.D., Head of the Pain Center of the Technical University Munich, Germany. “These results add to the growing body of medical evidence that supports the use of digital multimodal treatments for chronic conditions, such as back pain.” Low back pain is one of the leading causes of global disability, with an enormous cost for healthcare systems worldwide. 1,2 According to a 2018 report on the impact of musculoskeletal pain on employers, chronic pain, including back pain, accounts for 188.7 million lost work days, and $62,4 billion in lost productivity cost.3 Kaia is an app-based, multimodal digital therapy program for chronic back pain, which focuses on Physical therapy, Relaxation exercises, and Medical education.
  2. Content Article
    You may also like to watch: 2-minute Tuesdays: Guidance in a time of flux
  3. News Article
    A healthcare app which was investigated over failing to meet clinical and governance standards has been dropped by north London commissioners after it was deemed “clinically unsafe”. The Health Help Now app, currently used in eight north London boroughs, will be scrapped by the end of June and patients will be directed to the NHS app. In a statement, the North West London Collaboration of Clinical Commissioning Groups said it decided to carry out a review of the app as it had low uptake and dwindling funds, despite reporting in 2017 that it was being used by 500,000 patients. During the reivew, stakeholders told commissioners that a lack of clinical oversight meant the app was “unsafe” and financial constraints meant it was unsustainable. Read full story Source: HSJ, 26 June 2020
  4. News Article
    Singapore plans to open source a smartphone app its digital government team has developed to track citizens' encounters with coronavirus carriers. The app, named TraceTogether, and its government is urging citizens to run so that if they encounter a Coronavirus carrier, it’s easier to trace who else may have been exposed to the virus. With that info in hand, health authorities are better-informed about who needs to go into quarantine and can focus their resources on those who most need assistance. The app is opt-in and doesn’t track users through space, instead recording who you have encountered. To do so, it requires Bluetooth and location services to be turned on when another phone running the app comes into range exchanges four nuggets of information - a timestamp, Bluetooth signal strength, the phone’s model, and a temporary identifier or device nickname. While location services are required, the app doesn't track users, instead helping to calculate distances between them. Read full story Source: The Register, 26 March 2020
  5. News Article
    The NHS contact-tracing app will not be ready before winter, a health minister has said, despite initially being promised in mid-May. Lord Bethell said the Department of Health was "seeking to get something going for the winter". But, he told a committee of MPs, the app wasn't "the priority at the moment". Lord Bethell confirmed the government still planned to introduce a contact-tracing app, describing it as "a really important option for the future". The app has been the subject of a trial on the Isle of Wight, where the Department of Health says it has been downloaded by 54,000 people. Lord Bethell said the trial had been a success, but admitted that one of its principal lessons had been that greater emphasis needed to be placed on manual contact tracing. Asked why the app had taken so long to release, Lord Bethell told the Science and Technology Committee the Isle of Wight trial had shown that people "weren't frightened of it, as we were worried that they might be" - and had also provided "concrete examples" of successes in breaking transmission chains. But he admitted there had been "technical challenges", as well as an "ongoing battle" to persuade people the system was safe and privacy-protecting. Read full story Source: Sky News, 18 June 2020
  6. News Article
    In a major U-turn, the UK is ditching the way its current coronavirus-tracing app works and shifting to a model based on technology provided by Apple and Google. The Apple-Google design has been promoted as being more privacy-focused. However, it means epidemiologists will have access to less data. The government now intends to launch an app in the autumn, but it says the product may not involve contact tracing at that point. Instead the software may be limited to enabling users to report their symptoms and order a test. Baroness Dido Harding - who heads up the wider Test and Trace programme - will only give the green light to actually deploying the Apple-Google technology if she judges it to be fit for purpose, which she does not believe is the case at present. It is possible this may never happen. Read full story Source: BBC News, 18 June 2020
  7. News Article
    NHSX is working on a contact tracking app to trace the spread of coronavirus through the population. Contact tracking is already in limited use for people who have tested positive and the discipline has a long history in tuberculosis outbreaks. In a statement sent to HSJ, Matthew Gould, Chief Executive of NHSX, said : “NHSX are looking at whether app-based solutions might be helpful in tracking and managing coronavirus, and we have assembled expertise from inside and outside the organisation to do this as rapidly as possible.” Read full story (paywalled) Source: HSJ, 18 March 2020
  8. News Article
    The UK's scientists have been trying to trace COVID-19's path through the population ever since the coronavirus arrived on British shores. In what is thought to be the largest study of its kind in the world, an app developed by King's College London (KCL) and technology company Zoe, which tracks symptoms of the disease, has been downloaded more than three million times in the UK. Not to be confused with the government's contact-tracing app, the COVID-19 Symptom Study app allows users to report daily whether they feel healthy, and record any symptoms. The scientists have been using the data to estimate how the virus may have travelled through the population. Read full story Source: BBC News, 23 May 2020
  9. News Article
    Those recovering from Covid-19 are to be given devices which can help spot dips in their blood oxygen-levels while they recover at home. The NHS is trialling the use of oximeters, combined with an app, which will make it easier to spot whether people need to be re-admitted to hospital. The new oximeter service is being tested with more than 150 patients in sites on Watford, Hertfordshire and north London. Clinicians in ‘virtual wards’ are able to track patients’ vital signs – including temperature, heart rate and blood oxygen saturation – in near real-time, receiving alerts if they suggest a patient is deteriorating so that further assessments and care can be arranged. Health and Social Care Secretary, Matt Hancock, said: “While we restore face to face NHS services too, new innovations will ensure patients can benefit from the comfort of home, with the reassurance that they can be fast tracked to support from the NHS should they need. NHS at Home will help keep people safe and out of hospital while providing the best possible care.” Read full story Source: Digital Health, 5 June 2020
  10. Content Article
    Michael was diagnosed with Crohn's disease at the age of 12 and had his first operation at 14. He died last weekend and was the same age as me. Our daughters were in the same year at secondary school together, and we got to know each other that way at first and then through our mutual interest in health care. When he awoke from an operation to discover he had a stoma bag, he didn't wallow. He bought items online to make it a 'smart' stoma bag to be able to get an alert when it was near full and provide useful data to his medical consultants. This was the type of person he was. Whenever I needed help in anything and asked him, he would unconditionally do everything he could to help, and never failed to deliver – I wish I had been able to do more for him. When he realised that thousands of other patients would be able to benefit from his smart ostomy bag, he tried to get innovation funding to develop and manufacture it at scale for the NHS. He tried over 40 times and received over 40 rejections. People on the other side of the Atlantic were able to see what the NHS couldn't, and 11 Health (he was the 11th person to have a bowel transplant) moved to the West Coast of the USA and grew quickly. He was 'patient in residence' at Stanford Medical school, one of the first such roles in the world. With the clinicians at Stanford, they created the Everyone Included programme, a joint initiative between clinicians and patients which as he described it is "a framework for healthcare innovation, implementation and transformation based on principles of mutual respect and inclusivity". He mentioned this and his journey as a patient in his Ted X talk in 2018. In that talk, he calls for a Chief Patient Officer to work with healthcare execs in co-designing new services for patients or improving existing services. Involving patients in this sort of work is a key foundation for safer healthcare systems. This is not a non-exec role, it is not an arms length committee tick box role. It is a role that can have a profound effect on the ways that services are delivered to patients. It is hugely important and no UK care providers has anyone like this on their exec teams. If you know different, please comment on it below. I think it is about time that a movement to appoint Chief Patient Officers into Trusts was started, don't you? See here for a detailed interview with Michael in 2018: https://www.highland-marketing.com/interviews/hm-interview-michael-seres/
  11. News Article
    Facial recognition has been added as a way of logging in to an NHS app that lets people order prescriptions, book appointments and find healthcare data. Initially, it will allow faster access to the services on the app, which is separate from the contact-tracing one, but its developers say it could also be used for COVID-19 "immunity passports". The NHS facial-recognition system, built by iProov and available for both Android devices and iOS, requires users to submit a photo of themselves from an official document such as their passport or driving license. They then scan their face using their phone and, following a short sequence of flashing colours, their identification will be verified and they will have access to all the services on the NHS app. Immunity passports need to link a person's identity to their coronavirus test results, so would require a robust way of allowing people to verify themselves. Those deemed clear of the virus could then prove their status via a code generated by an app. However, the idea is controversial, not least because there is no hard scientific evidence that having had the coronavirus provides people with long-lasting immunity. The World Health Organization has warned countries against implementing such passports, saying: "There is currently no evidence that people who have recovered from COVID-19 and have antibodies are protected from a second infection." Dr Tom Fisher, a senior researcher at Privacy International, said the implementation of such measures needed to be "necessary, proportionate and based on the epidemiological evidence". "For the moment, immunity passports do not meet this test," he said. "We must be concerned about the broad societal impact of such immunity passports. They are essentially about limiting the rights of those who are not deemed to be immune. This is a route to exclusion and discrimination." Read full story Source: BBC News, 27 May 2020
  12. Content Article
    The free version of Hospify is available right now and is in daily use at over 150 clinical sites around the country including London North West University Healthcare Trust, County Durham and Darlington, University Hospitals North Midlands, Frimley Park and Lincolnshire Community NHS Trust. Hospify is also backed by Innovate UK, Wayra Velocity Health (in partnership with Telefonica and MSD Pharmaceutical), Kent Surrey Sussex AHSN and the UNISON and Managers in Partnership Unions. A premium version of Hospify specifically designed for healthcare teams is also now available. Called the Hospify Hub, it features an online admin portal for onboarding staff, a web app that syncs with users’ phones, broadcast messaging/paging with document attachments and a survey and data collection tool. Please email info@hospify.com for more details or visit hub.hospify.com to set up a Hub and give it a try for yourself.
  13. News Article
    The Joint Committee on Human Rights has published a report on the contact tracing app, concluding that if effective, the app could pave the way out of the current lockdown restrictions and help prevent the spread of coronavirus, but there are significant concerns regarding surveillance and the impact on other human rights which must be addressed first. Last month the Committee launched their inquiry into the Government’s response to Covid-19: human rights implications. Following this, the Committee has produced a Reportthat outlines the key actions the Government must take to ensure that the app respects human rights including the right to privacy and non-discrimination at the same time as enabling individuals to move around more freely whilst helping to prevent the spread of the virus. The Chair of the Committee, Harriet Harman MP, said: “Assurances from Ministers about privacy are not enough. The Government has given assurances about protection of privacy so they should have no objection to those assurances being enshrined in law." "The contact tracing app involves unprecedented data gathering. There must be robust legal protection for individuals about what that data will be used for, who will have access to it and how it will be safeguarded from hacking. Parliament was able quickly to agree to give the Government sweeping powers. It is perfectly possible for parliament to do the same for legislation to protect privacy.” Read full story Source: www.parliament.uk, 7 May 2020
  14. News Article
    An NHS app that aims to track the spread of coronavirus is being rolled out for the first time, as part of a trial on the Isle of Wight. Council and healthcare workers will be the first to try the contact-tracing app, with the rest of the island able to download it from Thursday. The app aims to quickly trace recent contacts of anyone who tests positive for the virus. However, the new NHS coronavirus app will have “unintended consequences”, according to the head of the unit developing it. Officials do not know “exactly how it will work”, Matthew Gould, chief executive of NHSX, told a parliamentary committee. “There will be unintended consequences, there will for sure be some things we have to evolve,” he said. Privacy campaigners have raised concern over the potential for “mission creep” with the data that will be gathered on people’s movements and contact with others. The Health Service Journal reported that it has not yet passed tests on cyber security, performance and clinical safety needed to be included in the NHS app library. Read full story Source: The Independent, 4 May 2020
  15. News Article
    Health apps have grown enormously in popularity, even more so during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Since early March, more than 500 health apps contain coronavirus-related keywords in their description. People are taking advice from these apps, often using them to share sensitive information. Yet, in a time of fake reviews, scams and personal data breaches, not all health apps can be trusted. The Organisation for the Review of Care and Health Apps (ORCHA) has launched a health app formulary to help healthcare professionals and consumers know which health apps they can trust. As a free to use resource, the site includes reviews of health apps across a range of health conditions relevant to the COVID-19 pandemic, including reviews of COVID-19 apps launched to date. Read full story Source: ORCHA, 6 April 2020
  16. News Article
    Royal Wolverhampton Trust (RWT) has become the first provider to sign a deal with Babylon Health for citywide coverage of a new COVID-19 app, HSJ has learned. Digital health provider Babylon announced earlier this month the creation of a “covid-19 care assistant” app, which provides patients with digital triage, a live chat service, a symptom tracker and video consultation. RWT’s deal covers around 300,000 patients registered to a Wolverhampton GP, and all trust staff regardless of where they live. Earlier this year, RWT announced a 10-year deal with Babylon to develop a “digital-first integrated care” model. The new COVID-19 app will be made available to staff today and will then be rolled out to the general public next week. Read full story Source: HSJ, 3 April 2020
  17. News Article
    University Hospitals has partnered with medical technology company Masimo to pilot a telehealth solution, Masimo SafetyNet, that is designed to help clinicians care for patients remotely with a finger sensor and phone app. The demand for remote monitoring and patient engagement in different settings has "significantly increased" during the COVID-19 pandemic. To help prepare for a surge in COVID-19 patients and protect other patients and providers, the tool allows University Hospitals and other hospitals to expand patient monitoring to the home or other locations (for instance, a skilled nursing facility or an under-utilised med-surg floor) that are temporarily set up to address increased demand. Guidelines from the World Health Organization suggest monitoring the oxygen saturation, respiration rate and temperature of suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients. Adapting this existing technology aims to offer a secure remote solution. Read full story Source: Crain's Cleveland Business, 23 March 2020
  18. News Article
    WHO has launched a messaging service with partners WhatsApp and Facebook to keep people safe from coronavirus. This easy-to-use messaging service has the potential to reach 2 billion people and enables WHO to get information directly into the hands of the people that need it. From government leaders to health workers and family and friends, this messaging service will provide the latest news and information on coronavirus including details on symptoms and how people can protect themselves and others. It also provides the latest situation reports and numbers in real time to help government decision-makers protect the health of their populations. The service can be accessed through a link that opens a conversation on WhatsApp. Users can simply type “hi” to activate the conversation, prompting a menu of options that can help answer their questions about COVID-19. The WHO Health Alert was developed in collaboration with Praekelt.Org, using Turn machine learning technology. Read full story Source: World Health Organization, 20 March 2020
  19. News Article
    MedStar Health launched a new tool that automatically calculates a patient's risk of having a heart attack or stroke within 10 years. The tool enables doctors to more easily show patients their personal risk for heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases over time using easy-to-read graphics. "Seeing their risk on a visual display is more powerful than me telling them their risk,” said Ankit Shah, Director, Sports and Performance Cardiology for the MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute at Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore. The tool is embedded in MedStar's Cerner electronic health record (EHR), making it easier for physicians to use it during patient visits, health system officials said. The project highlights how MedStar Health National Center for Human Factors focuses on human factor design to improve technology for patients as well as providers. Final rules from the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) will make it easier in the future for patients to share their health data with third-party apps. Read full story Source: FierceHealthcare, 9 March 2020
  20. News Article
    Controversial healthcare app maker Babylon Health has criticised the doctor who first raised concerns about the safety of their AI chatbot. Babylon Health’s chatbot is available in the company’s GP at Hand app, a digital healthcare solution championed by health secretary Matt Hancock. The chatbot aims to reduce the burden on GPs and A&E departments by automating the triage process to determine whether someone can treat themselves at home, should book an online or in-person GP appointment, or go straight to a hospital. A Twitter user under the pseudonym of Dr Murphy first reached out to us back in 2018 alleging that Babylon Health’s chatbot was giving unsafe advice. Dr Murphy recently unveiled himself as Dr David Watkins and went public with his findings at The Royal Society of Medicine’s “Recent developments in AI and digital health 2020“ event. Over the past couple of years, Dr Watkins has provided countless examples of the chatbot giving dangerous advice. In a press release (PDF) on Monday, Babylon Health calls Dr Watkins a “troll” who has “targeted members of our staff, partners, clients, regulators and journalists and tweeted defamatory content about us”. Read full story Source: AI News, 26 February 2020
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