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Found 75 results
  1. Content Article
    Key points Audit measures practice against performance. The audit cycle involves five stages: preparing for audit; selecting criteria; measuring performance level; making improvements; sustaining improvements. Choose audit topics based on high risk, high volume, or high cost problems, or on national clinical audits, national service frameworks, or guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Derive standards from good quality guidelines. Use action plans to overcome the local barriers to change and identify those responsible for service improvement. Repeat the audit to find out whether improvements in care have been implemented after the first audit.
  2. News Article
    MPs are to launch a new system for evaluating whether key health targets are being met in England. A panel of experts reporting to the Commons health committee will assess progress made on policy commitments, starting with maternity services. They will rate performance from "outstanding" to "inadequate" and seek to drive improvements where needed. Panel chair Dame Jane Dacre said it would be "fair and impartial" in its findings. She said she was keen to ask recent patients and users of NHS services to contribute to the panel's work as well as specialists in chosen fields, all of whom would have no political affiliation. "It will be challenging, but I am committed to using available evidence to evaluate pledges, with the aim of improving patient care," she added. The panel will scrutinise, on behalf of the health committee, major commitments made by the Department of Health, NHS England, NHS Improvement and other public bodies. It will base its approach on the Care Quality Commission, which evaluates care homes, hospitals, GP practices and other health services. Read full story Source: BBC News, 5 August 2020
  3. Content Article
    Pain affects all of us on occasion, but thankfully can be controlled or abates over a short period of time. For some, pain is ongoing to the degree of becoming persistent and for many is it significant. An estimated 14 million people in the UK live with chronic pain. Pain therefore is a frequently presenting complaint across a wide range of health care settings. It presents to primary and community care and specialist (secondary) and specialised (tertiary). For most, their pain is treated, managed or resolved within the primary care and community setting. The pain management of those for whom this does not happen must be scaled up, which means referral to more specialised care. This referral should be timely; persistent pain does not go away but develops and accelerates over time through well recognised neurophysiological processes. The principle driving these standards is to have an acceptable level of care in pain management which is consistent, both geographically and from initial to escalating levels of care. These standards are multidisciplinary, that is to say they apply to all clinical professions to include nursing, physiotherapy, clinical psychology, occupational therapy and medicine. It is intended however that this work is not only a clinical guideline for those working to deliver pain management but that it is a reference and framework for those planning or negotiating pain services in the wider sense, particularly commissioners.
  4. Content Article
    The draft standard outlined 10 components on what the NHS expects. It’s based on existing standards and will support a process for reviewing, assessing and evaluating digital health technologies that meet the standard. It is also intended to speed up and streamline how health technologies are reviewed and commissioned by the NHS and social care. Patient Safety Learning's response to the draft: “The standard mentions safety up front as a fundamental principle which is good, but there are areas that still need addressing. For example, the need for user testing is implied, but not explicit; where a DHT provides any sort of personalised advice or output, it must gather sufficient context about the user to do this safely and the use of appropriately expert clinicians in the development of the DHT (including those who have worked on ML algorithms) should be tightened up. There are also issues around data that ought to be addressed. Such as the user being able to see (if they have consented appropriately) who their data has been shared with and when; users should be able to change their mind about this when they want to and easily stop their data being shared; and should the DHT vendor no longer support the DHT, they should offer to give the user their data back and wipe it from their servers, or just say it will be deleted.”
  5. News Article
    An NHS trust at the centre of an inquiry into preventable baby deaths will repay money it received for providing good maternity care. In 2018, Shrewsbury and Telford NHS Trust received almost £1m, weeks before its services were rated inadequate. The BBC revealed in December the trust had qualified for the payment under the NHS's Maternity Incentive Scheme. The trust said an "incorrect submission" had been made and it had ordered an independent review. Shrewsbury and Telford NHS Trust (SaTH) is at the centre of England's largest inquiry into poor maternity care, with more than 900 families contacting a review looking into concerns over preventable deaths and long-term harm. Former health secretary Jeremy Hunt wrote to ministers questioning if improvements to the Maternity Incentive Scheme were needed in light of payments made to both Shrewsbury and Telford and East Kent Hospitals, despite both facing serious questions over the safety of maternity services. The trust in Shropshire was paid £963,391 after certifying it had met the 10 safety standards demanded by the scheme, which is run by NHS Resolution. In the letter, seen by the BBC, Mr Hunt suggested one improvement would be to link payments to CQC maternity and safety ratings. "The whole approach is likely to be discredited if trusts can meet all 10 actions and yet still be delivering poor standards of care," the letter said. Read full story Source: BBC News, 6 March 2020
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