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Found 60 results
  1. Content Article
    Project charters are written documents that come in many forms. For improvement projects, they should include, as a minimum, a concise summary of: What the team wants to achieve from their improvement efforts, described as an improvement aim. Include how much improvement will be achieved, who the improvement is for and when the improvement will be achieved by. Why the work is important – the rationale or business case for the work. This should outline; the problem the work will address, how this links to strategic objectives, how you know this is a problem, who is affected, the impact of doing nothing and the benefits to be derived from improvement e.g. outcomes and costs. The scope of the project - what is included in the work. How the team intend to achieve the improvement aim – this should include initial ideas for change and the supporting activities to make the work happen. How the team will measure the impact of the work. Who will be involved the work and their role. Key people should include; subject matter experts, process owners who can make changes, representatives of those impacted by your project (families, young people, patients, customers etc), finance representative (where needed), and a sponsor linked to executive level for leadership support. Any risks to the delivery of the project, so that decisions can be made on how these should be addressed.
  2. Community Post
    I am interested in what colleagues here think about the proposed patient safety specialist role? https://improvement.nhs.uk/resources/introducing-patient-safety-specialists/ https://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/nhs-patient-safety-hospitals-mistakes-harm-a9259486.html Can this development make a difference? Or will it lead to safety becoming one person's responsibility and / or more of the same as these responsibilities will be added to list of duties of already busy staff? Can these specialist be a driver for culture change including embedding a just culture and a focus on safety-II and human factors? What support do trusts and specialists need for this to happen? Some interesting thoughts on this here: https://twitter.com/TerryFairbanks/status/1210357924104736768
  3. Content Article
    The NHS Patient Safety Strategy, published in June 2019, sets out three strategic aims around Insight, Involvement and Improvement which will enable it to achieve its safety vision. It defines the Involvement aim as ‘equipping patients, staff and partners with the skills and opportunities to improve patient safety throughout the whole system’. A key action associated with this is a proposal to create Patient Safety Specialists within each NHS organisation in England. The strategy explains that ‘giving everyone in the NHS a foundation level understanding of patient safety is critical, but we also need experts to lead on safety in their own organisations’.NHS England and NHS Improvement have published draft Patient Safety Specialist requirements for public consultation. Patient Safety Learning welcome any increase in patient safety capacity and expertise in the NHS and have provided specific feedback on the draft requirements for this role. In our response we identify several areas where we believe these can be improved, including the following points: Patient Safety Specialists having a clear and direct reporting line to a named executive director on the Board with an assigned patient safety role and to a non-executive director with a similar role. Ensuring that the requirements identify key relationships for the role holders not identified in the draft document: Medical Examiners, Coroners, Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch, Governors, Non-Executive Board Members, HR Directors and NHS Resolution. Including a requirement that Patient Safety Specialists should demonstrate that they have the right skills and experience to work with patients, families and their carers on patient safety issues. They should also show that they can support their organisation to engage effectively in co-production with these groups. The need to strengthen the requirements for the individuals holding these roles to have knowledge and experience of: Investigations, Complaints, Just Culture, Systems Thinking and Human Factors. Giving consideration to how Patient Safety Specialists will engage with frontline staff, who are notable by their lack of reference in the draft requirements.
  4. Content Article
    Highlights of the paper: Principles of mindful organising are operationalised in a Mindful Governance model. The model is grounded in two cases studies in contrasting aviation organisations. The case studies led to the development of three prototype web applications.
  5. News Article
    The ghosts of medical errors haunt Dr. Peter Pronovost. Two deaths, both caused by mistakes. First, his father’s, who died as the result of a cancer misdiagnosis. Then a little girl, a burn victim who succumbed to infection and diagnostic missteps at the hospital where Pronovost worked early in his career. Those deaths led Pronovost to pursue a medical career dedicated to patient safety, and to create the medical checklist he has become known for worldwide. Now, he’s implementing his second act, at University Hospitals in the USA, as its Chief Transformation Officer, a job he has held since late 2018. His goal: To transform a $4 billion health care system by reducing shortcomings in medical care and increasing the quality of treatment. The challenge fits Pronovost, says one of his former Johns Hopkins University professors, Dr. Albert Wu. “He’s one of the few people for whom the title might be appropriate, because his work has led to significant changes and innovations in how we deliver health care in the United States. “He’s a once-in-a-generation guy.” Read full story Source: Cleveland.com, 9 February 2020
  6. Content Article
    Hi Sue, can you tell us a little about yourself? My background is in tissue viability and I retain the clinical and leadership role with tissue viability as part of this role. I have been in tissue viability for 17 years and developed and continue to lead the service at Ashford and St Peter's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. During this time I was seconded into the post of Acting Assistant Chief Nurse 0.5WTE for 1 year. Previous to this, I worked as a Deputy Head of Practice Development and a Ward Sister. You are the first harms prevention nurse consultant in the UK. How did the role come about? The Trust Chief Nurse had the vision to look at hospital associated harms as a whole and how this needs to be managed in a strategic way across the Trust. The role ties in with the NHS Patient Safety Strategy 2019. Where does your role sit within the governance structure? The role sits within the corporate division and has close ties and associations with all of the divisions and their governance structures. The post reports into the Trust Safety and Quality Committee. How long have you been in post? This is the start of my fourth week. What are the main purposes of the role? My role includes: Leading and developing the Harms Free Care Service across the Trust. Developing the Trust Harm Free Care Strategy and monitor its effectiveness. Leading on the Harms Free Care Strategy within the Trust, working with the teams to deliver a sustained reduction in pressure damage, avoidable falls, the absence of a new venous thromboembolism (VTE), harm associated with poor nutrition and the absence of catheter associated urine infection. Being expected to develop and influence strategies and frameworks to ensure that all healthcare staff adhere to Trust policies relating to Harm Free Care, through developing practice linked to the clinical governance and performance frameworks and Trust corporate objectives. Supporting the Trust to develop and implement systems for performance monitoring and performance improvement programmes for pressure ulcers, VTE, falls, nutrition and catheter associated urinary tract infection. Talk us through a typical day. It's a little early to talk about a typical day yet. I still have a clinical role in tissue viability 2 days per week as part of my role and so these days are spent assessing and planning care for patients with complex wound needs, providing education and training. The rest of my time is filled with planning for the role of Harms Free Care, looking at our present data and analysis, meeting with the harms leads, such as the VTE prevention lead nurse and the nutrition lead. Have you had a chance to see what impact the role has had on patient safety? It’s too early to look at impacts, but feedback has been positive that harms must be seen together and not separately. Meaning that we should not concentrate on the reduction of one harm at the potential cost of a rise in another, the harms are interrelated and need to be focused on as such. One of the key parts of the role will be ensuring our metrics in relation to harm are relevant and meaningful to both staff and patients. How are you measuring the impact of the role? There will be multiple measures which will be benchmarked against improvement targets for the reduction of harms. This will include data such as numbers of harms as well as other data such as patient feedback. How do you engage staff and patients in patient safety? We engage staff via various means: education, bulletins, focus days such as Worldwide Stop the Pressure Day, focus weeks such as Nutrition and Hydration Week. We are working towards engagement strategies as part of the NHS Patient Safety Strategy. How do you see this role developing? I would like to see this role being adopted by other Trusts as we have a concerted focus across the NHS to reduce patient harms.
  7. Content Article
    NHS Improvement are asking NHS organisations to identify, by June 2020, at least one person from their existing employees as their patient safety specialist. Training for these specialists will be based on the national patient safety syllabus being developed with Health Education England. Working with representatives from a few NHS trusts, patient safety partners (patient and public voice representatives) and clinical commissioning groups, NHS Improvement have drafted the requirements for a patient safety specialist to help organisations identify the most appropriate person(s) for the role. You can download the draft requirements here. NHS Improvement are inviting comments and feedback on this through their survey which can be accesed via the link at the bottom of this page. Consultation closes 12 March 2020.
  8. Content Article
    Part I illustrates why improving safety is so difficult and complex, and why current approaches need to change. Part II looks at some of the work being done to improve safety and offers examples and insights to support practical improvements in patient safety. Part III explains why the system needs to think differently about safety, giving policymakers an insight into how their actions can create an environment where continuous safety improvement will flourish, as well as how they can help to tackle system-wide problems that hinder local improvement.
  9. Content Article
    This website give access to: the Improvement hub resources events news and alerts.
  10. Content Article
    The paper sets out how the AHSN alongside the PSCs have improved patient safety and their goals for the future: We will support the foundations of the national strategy: a patient safety culture and a patient safety system, across all settings of care. The PSCs will deliver the patient safety strategy improvements and seek the next tranche of national programmes for national adoption and spread. We will work with our members, Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs) and Integrated Care Systems (ICSs) to roll out and embed these national initiatives in the local areas, ensuring ownership and sustainability. We will work alongside the Regional Patient Safety Teams focusing on their system-wide objectives to support STPs and ICSs to identify and implement transformational change. Each region will have differing local needs depending on their starting point, but there will be cross-cutting themes that every PSC can support in a standardised way. Following the adoption and spread of the national initiatives, the AHSN network can support the seven regions with the national programme of capacity and capability building, utilising our local academies and delivery mechanisms for integrated quality improvement, Health Foundation training and innovation training. We will support the capacity and capability and leadership development programmes particularly helping our local system leaders and partners to build knowledge and understanding of the innovation landscape and the opportunities this affords their own organisation’s and wider system’s safety agendas. We will build on the operational and strategic relationships we have with other national bodies also interested and engaged in the world of patient safety. In particular, we will strengthen our partnership with: The Health Foundation (HF), which has supported the development of the early phases of a number of projects that have developed into national patient safety initiatives; Health Education England (HEE) to deliver the safety mandate, building on our existing relationship which sees us working together on joint programmes of work such as learning from deaths and the response to the Topol Review, focusing on the opportunities for safety from genomics, artificial intelligence (AI) and the digital revolution.
  11. Content Article
    Kegan proposes that there is a deep need for us to understand what it is that gets in the way of a person's genuine intention and what they can actually bring about. He looks at how we might address this gap, which he refers to as an 'Immunity to Change'.
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