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Found 20 results
  1. Content Article
    Surgical mesh is a medical device implanted to support organs in various procedures. Thousands of women in the UK had mesh surgically implanted to treat pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence, until its use was suspended due to safety concerns in 2018.[1] Surgical mesh has been linked to a wide range of serious health issues including chronic pain, incontinence, painful sex, recurrent infections, loss of mobility and autoimmune diseases. Prior to the suspension, women injured by mesh had been raising concerns about the safety of the procedure for years and campaigning for change
  2. News Article
    Nearly 38,000 vital follow-up appointments with mental health patients were missed at the time when they were most at risk of suicide, the Royal College of Psychiatrists has said. The medical body has called for “urgent action” to ensure more people are seen for follow-ups within 72 hours of their discharge from inpatient care, to prevent them from falling “through the cracks when they are so vulnerable”. The risk of suicide is highest on the second and third days after leaving a mental health ward, but 37,999 follow-up appointments with patients were not made within this timeframe i
  3. Content Article
    This article sets out six ways hospitals can ensure patient safety during treatment: Provide Patient Centric Quality Care Design Purpose-Built Hospital Adopt a Health Management System Formulate and Revise Staffing Policies Enforce Safety Protocols Educate the Staff and Patients about Safety Policies
  4. Content Article
    Arterial lines are routinely fitted for severely ill patients in critical care and are flushed with a solution to maintain patency, and ensure that blood does not clot in the line. Saline is recommended as the flush solution for arterial lines. There is a known patient safety risk in connection with this where glucose solutions being inadvertently and incorrectly used to flush arterial lines. This has led to inaccuracies in blood glucose measurements, which resulted in unnecessary administration of insulin and subsequent cases of hypoglycaemia, some of which have been fatal. Findings
  5. Community Post
    These comments were made by people with diabetes in response to a Twitter thread asking "Why is a hospital stay scary if you have diabetes?" If you have diabetes, or care for someone who does, please share your experience with us by adding a comment to this community thread, “I was in ICU after a car accident—none of the staff knew how to work my CGM and/or my insulin pump. I had to manage my own care” “For me it was when I went into hospital for surgery and the nurse said 'Type 1... so do you take insulin for that?'... that's not a reassuring thing to hear minutes before you'r
  6. Content Article
    For people with diabetes (PWD), hospitals can feel like unsafe places. As a result, many are afraid of having to access emergency care or stay in hospital as an inpatient. This is partly because PWD are experts at self-management, with intricate knowledge of their own bodies. I have personal experience of this, having had type 1 diabetes myself for nearly two decades. As PWD, although we can't always predict how our diabetes will behave, our decisions on how to react to every situation become instinctive. When control is taken from our hands it feels terrifying; how could anyone else make a sa
  7. Content Article
    A new investigation report has been published by HSIB with the aim of helping to improve patient safety in relation to administering high-strength insulin from a pen device to patients with diabetes in a hospital setting.[1] The investigation focuses on the case of Kathleen who has type 2 diabetes and was using a high-strength insulin administered from an insulin pen device to manage her condition. The insulin in her pen device was Humulin R U-500 insulin, which is five times the strength of most insulins. On being admitted to hospital (for a reason unrelated to her diabetes) a nurse
  8. Content Article
    Kathleen, who has type 2 diabetes and was using a high-strength insulin administered from an insulin pen device to manage her condition. The insulin in her pen device was Humulin R U-500 insulin, which is five times the strength of most insulins. On being admitted to hospital (for a reason unrelated to her diabetes) a nurse administered her insulin as measured by an insulin syringe, rather than the pen device. However, the syringe was intended for use with standard strength insulin and as a result Kathleen was given five times the dose of insulin that she had been prescribed. She received
  9. Content Article
    Findings Participants’ perceptions regarding their engagement as a patient safety strategy were expressed through three overarching themes: the word 'patient' obscures the message safety is a shared responsibility involvement in safety is a right. Themes were further defined by eight subthemes. Conclusions Using direct messaging, such as 'your safety' as opposed to 'patient safety' and teaching patients specific behaviours to maintain their safety appeared to facilitate patient engagement and increase awareness of safety issues. Patients may be willing to
  10. Content Article
    e-PAIN uniquely distills the knowledge of a range of professionals into 12 Modules made up of interactive sessions to meet the needs of a multidisciplinary audience. e-PAIN is current, up to date and presented in an interactive way to make both basic and specialist knowledge accessible. Any module can be completed stand alone and you can download a certificate upon completion of each module. Sessions take on average 30 minutes to complete and modules have on average 5 sessions. e-PAIN is a collaboration between the Faculty of Pain Medicine, the British Pain Society and e-Learning for Heal
  11. News Article
    The quality and performance of services will suffer if medical training is not ‘prioritised and funded’ by trusts, Health Education England (HEE) has warned. HEE has set out actions in its “Covid training recovery interim report” that must be done alongside NHS England, the Department of Health and Social Care and others to protect post-covid workforce recovery. At the beginning of the pandemic, junior doctors’ training was severely disrupted because thousands of staff were redeployed to covid wards, while most routine elective operations and diagnostic procedures were stopped.
  12. Content Article
    Here is the FRAS tool I implemented: Fire risk assessment tool.pdf Other useful resources I found: Scoring_Fire_Risk-2.pdf Surgical Site Fire Triangle.pdf Surgical_Fire_Poster (1).pdf Video: Fire hazard demo by Zaamin Hussain and Mike Reed Demonstration: "Burning Bruce" drives home the reality of surgical fires - article in Outpatient Surgery
  13. Content Article
    The Royal College of Physicians calls for the NHS to take the opportunity to address the consultant shortage as the UK begins to recover from the Covid-19 pandemic. Key findings of the census Only 52% of posts advertised were filled. For the past eight years, barely half of advertised consultant posts were filled, mostly due to a lack of suitable applicants. 36% of consultants described being in control of their workload only ‘sometimes’ or ‘almost never’. 38% said that they worked excessive hours or had an excessive workload ‘almost always’ or ‘most of the time’. 35% o
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