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Found 90 results
  1. News Article
    A doctor who attempted to cover up the true circumstances of the death in 1995 of a four-year-old patient has been struck off. Consultant paediatric anaesthetist Dr Robert Taylor dishonestly misled police and a public inquiry about his treatment of Adam Strain, who died at the Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children, a medical tribunal found. The youngster was admitted for a kidney transplant at the hospital following renal failure but did not survive surgery in November 1995. Six months later an inquest ruled Adam died from cerebral oedema – brain swelling – partly due to the
  2. News Article
    Vulnerable patients cared for in secure mental health units across England could miss out on vital medications due to a shortage of learning disability nurses, the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch (HSIB) has warned. The report into medication omissions in learning disability secure units across the country highlights problems with retaining learning disability nurses, with the number recruited each year matching those leaving. Figures quoted in the report suggest the number of learning disability nurses in the NHS nearly halved from 5,500 in 2016 to 3,000 in 2020. The HSI
  3. News Article
    Some pharmacies run by the High Street chain Boots have been criticised for telling some patients on multiple drugs that they can no longer have blister pack boxes, known as dosette boxes or multi-compartment compliance aids (MCCAs). Weekly pill organisers can help users keep track of their daily medication and stay safe. Pharmacists put the tablets into individual boxes in the trays, each one indicating when they should be taken. The NHS says boxes are not always available for free on the NHS and they're not suitable for every type of medicine. Tracey Hobbs' mother, Pat Garner,
  4. Content Article
    NICE Guidance NG5: Medicines optimisation: the safe and effective use of medicines to enable the best possible outcomes recommends sharing relevant information about medicines when people move from one care setting to another. Medicines reconciliation should be completed as soon as possible when people have been discharged from hospital or another care setting. Medicines errors can happen when people move between services. You should record a current list of medicine, including: prescribed over-the-counter complementary medicines. You should compare this list wit
  5. Content Article
    This good practice guidance from the Royal Pharmaceutical Society provides four guiding principles for medicines optimisation that will help all healthcare professionals to support patients to get the best outcomes from their medicines use. Principle 1. Aim to understand the patient’s experience. Principle 2. Evidence based choice of medicines. Principle 3. Ensure medicines use is as safe as possible. Principle 4. Make medicines optimisation part of routine practice.
  6. News Article
    When a couple decides to try to have a child by in vitro fertilisation, it’s often accompanied by anticipation, anxiety and worry about whether the egg and sperm will unite and produce a healthy baby. So when the procedure to retrieve eggs from a woman’s ovary turns out to be physically painful, it can create long-term emotional pain as well, according to a lawsuit and two women who underwent the procedure at the Yale University Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Clinic. They are among dozens of women and spouses who are suing Yale University, claiming the staff at the clinic
  7. Content Article
    ADRe is designed for use by nursing staff (NVQ level 3-5 or above), the professionals closest to patients. By using ADRe complex information on drugs is combined into a checklist providing advice on common problems. This helps nurses recognise and act on adverse drug reaction, including pain, dental pain, aggression, peptic ulcers, and sedation. In doing so, it greatly enhances the administration of medicines, and by capturing this individualised picture of the patients’ health and well-being prompts prescribers to refine dosages. ADRe is very simple to use: Nurses use the Profile
  8. Content Article
    A recent investigation report published by HSIB intends to improve patient safety in relation to the use of oral morphine sulfate solution (a strong pain-relieving medication taken by mouth).[1] The investigation focused on the case of Len, who took an accidental overdose of morphine sulfate oral solution. He had previously been diagnosed with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a progressive disease that affects the nervous system, and had been prescribed morphine sulfate by his GP for persistent symptoms of breathlessness and pain following a fall. Len was prescribed morphine sulfate, whi
  9. Content Article
    Findings The initial choice of paracetamol and ibuprofen to control Len’s pain following his fall was in line with national guidance. Len’s pain was not effectively controlled on paracetamol and ibuprofen, therefore required review by his GP to address this. The choice of a morphine liquid was in line with national guidance and a reduced morphine dose was prescribed in line with recommendations for the older person and Len’s degree of kidney dysfunction. Len’s dose of morphine was displayed on the dispensing label attached to the outer box that the morphine was provide
  10. Content Article
    Supplying valproate safely to women and girls Pharmacy professionals have a key role in supplying valproate safely. Valproate must not be used in any woman or girl able to have children unless there is a pregnancy prevention programme (PPP) in place. For women and girls, when they are dispensed valproate, they should expect: to be provided with a Patient Card every time valproate is dispensed for valproate to be dispensed with a copy of the patient information leaflet, and if repackaged, with a warning on the container supplied to be reminded of the risks in pregn
  11. News Article
    We have the technology to start a new era in medicine by precisely matching drugs to people's genetic code, a major report says. Some drugs are completely ineffective or become deadly because of subtle differences in how our bodies function. The British Pharmacological Society and the Royal College of Physicians say a genetic test can predict how well drugs work in your body. The tests could be available on the NHS next year. It would have helped Jane Burns, from Liverpool, who lost two-thirds of her skin when she reacted badly to a new epilepsy drug. She was put on to carb
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