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Found 67 results
  1. News Article
    The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has criticised a new trust’s leadership after issuing it with a warning notice to improve care in its two emergency departments. The watchdog warned North Cumbria Integrated Care Foundation Trust that patients were not always receiving timely and appropriate care, while delayed transfers of care had “resulted in significant delays in admitting patients on to wards”. The CQC — which carried out focused inspections at the trust in August and September after concerns were raised about risks to patient and staff safety — added there was evidence of “insufficient numbers of suitably qualified, skilled, competent and experienced clinical staff”. The CQC also said there was a lack of an effective system to mitigate risks, including infection control in the emergency department escalation areas and on some medical wards. Of the trust’s Cumberland Infirmary and West Cumberland hospitals, the CQC said: “People could not access the urgent and emergency care and medicine service when they needed them and often had long waits for treatment.” The CQC’s inspection report, published today, also said the trust had an “inexperienced leadership team” which “did not always have the necessary skills and abilities to lead effectively”. It added there were “few examples of leaders making a demonstrable impact on the quality or sustainability of services”. Read full story (paywalled) Source: HSJ, 30 November 2020
  2. News Article
    A care agency which left people "at risk of avoidable harm" by not ensuring staff had been properly trained has been put into special measures. Stars Social Support, which provides personal care to people living in their own home, was inspected by the Care Quality Commission earlier this year. Inspectors found safe recruitment procedures were not in place to make sure suitable staff were employed. A report following the inspection states that "safe recruitment procedures were not in place to ensure only staff suitable to work in the caring profession were employed." It said people's references had not been followed up after they had been requested, according to the Local Democracy Reporting Service. The report added: "When the disclosure and barring service (DBS) identified concerns, a risk assessment had not been completed to assess staff suitability." Inspectors also found not all staff who provided care had received appropriate training or training updates to ensure they were competent. Read full story Source: BBC News, 21 November 2020
  3. Content Article
    Patient Safety Tool Box Talks© Theme 1 talks - Person centred care and supportre and Support Patient Safety Tool Box Talks© Theme 2 talks - Effective care and support Patient Safety Tool Box Talks© Theme 3 talks - Safe care and support Patient Safety Tool Box Talks© Theme 5 talks - Leadership, governance and management Patient Safety Tool Box Talks© Theme 8 talks - Use of information
  4. Content Article
    Whilst the principle aim of the guide is to support Guardians’ training needs, reflective practice and self-development, it could also be useful for: Regional and National Networks who might like to use the resources to support a local conversation about aspects of good practice Induction and other training programmes, for which the guide provides easily accessible materials to use and download. Organisations keen to support their Guardians by understanding the nature and complexity of the role. Informing Guardian’s organisational appraisals and PDPs. The Guide offers a short perspective on each of twenty-one competencies alongside questions for reflection and links to supportive material which will be regularly refreshed.
  5. News Article
    A major British medical school is leading the drive to eliminate what it calls "inherent racism" in the way doctors are trained in the UK. The University of Bristol Medical School says urgent action is needed to examine why teaching predominantly focuses on how illnesses affect white people above all other sections of the population. It comes after students pushed for reform, saying gaps in their training left them ill-prepared to treat ethnic minority patients – potentially compromising patient safety. Hundreds of other UK medical students have signed petitions demanding teaching that better reflects the diversity of the country. The Medical School Council (led by the heads of UK medical schools) and the regulator, the General Medical Council, say they are putting plans in place to improve the situation. A number of diseases manifest differently depending on skin tone, but too little attention is given to this in training, according to Dr Joseph Hartland, who is helping to lead changes at the University of Bristol Medical School. "Historically medical education was designed and written by white middle-class men, and so there is an inherent racism in medicine that means it exists to serve white patients above all others," he said . "When patients are short of breath, for example, students are often taught to look out for a constellation of signs – including a blue tinge to the lips or fingertips – to help judge how severely ill someone is, but these signs can look different on darker skin." "Essentially we are teaching students how to recognise a life-or-death clinical sign largely in white people, and not acknowledging these differences may be dangerous," said Dr Hartland. Read full story Source: BBC News, 17 August 2020
  6. Event
    The Patient Safety Movement Foundation is proud to partner with MedStar Health to offer free Continuing Education (CE) credit for this patient safety webinar. With Dr. Arthur Kanowitz, Dr. Sarah Kandil, Dr. Edwin Loftin, Dr. Anne Lyren, Dr. Kevin McQueen and Dr. Lauren Berkow. Free CE offered for physicians and nurses. This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ and ANCC contact hours. Registration
  7. Event
    The Patient Safety Movement Foundation is proud to partner with MedStar Health to offer free Continuing Education (CE) credit for this patient safety webinar. With Patricia Merryweather-Arges, Dr. Ronald Wyatt, Dr. Daria Terrell, and Dr. Marcus Robinson. M Free CE offered for physicians, nurses, and pharmacists. This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ and ANCC contact hours. Register
  8. Event
    This masterclass, facilitated by Barry Moult, a former Head of Information Governance for an NHS Trust, and his colleague Andrew Harvey, will focus on developing your role as a SIRO (Senior Information Risk Officer) in health and social care. Further information and to book your place or email kate@hc-uk.org.uk A discount is available to hub members by quoting reference hcuk20psl when booking (cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer; full T&Cs available upon request).
  9. Event
    This masterclass, facilitated by Barry Moult, a former Head of Information Governance for an NHS Trust, and his colleague Andrew Harvey, will focus on developing your role as a SIRO (Senior Information Risk Officer) in health and social care. Further information and to book your place or email kate@hc-uk.org.uk A discount is available to hub members by quoting reference hcuk20psl when booking (cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer; full T&Cs available upon request).
  10. Event
    until
    Bringing together healthcare and patient safety changemakers from across the globe, RLDatix Palooza creates a unique learning environment. With immersive education sessions, enlightening keynotes, healthcare thought leadership panels, interactive hands-on training opportunities and lively evening network activities – this is a conference like no other. You’ll leave with the inspiration (and skills) you need to take your patient safety initiatives to the next level. Registration
  11. Event
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    Book here Matt Hassan, National Retraining Scheme and National Skills Fund Programme Director, Department for Education Iain Murray, Senior Policy Officer, TUC Nic Trower, Senior Policy Advisor, CBI Juliet Stuttard, Director, PwC UK Patrick Craven, Director of Assessment Policy, Research and Compliance, City & Guilds Dr Fiona Aldridge, Director, Policy and Research, Learning and Work Institute and Kenny Barron, Unite the Union; Joe Billington, National Careers Service; Stephen Cole, CITB; Lesley Giles, Work Advance; Jack Orlik, Nesta; Dr Susan Pember, Holex; Patrick Spencer, Centre for Social Justice; Simon Tindall, The Open University and Paul Warner, Association of Employment and Learning Providers Chaired by: Baroness Garden of Frognal, Deputy Speaker, House of Lords Lord Watson of Invergowrie, Shadow Spokesperson for Education The agenda: What has been learnt from the National Retraining Scheme Creating an effective retraining offer - funding, scope, and engagement with industry and the workforce Case study: international approaches to lifelong learning The role of qualifications in the future lifelong learning landscape Adapting to a changing labour market following COVID-19 - careers advice and guidance, retraining, digital literacy and the impact on labour mobility Lessons from the National Retraining Scheme pilots and user research, and the next steps for the National Skills Fund The discussion will also look ahead to: the role of the NRS in dealing with medium term skills needs following the COVID-19 pandemic the establishment of the Government’s new £2.5bn National Skills Fund prior to an expected consultation on the fund which will look at long term skills needs wider issues around lifelong learning Funding With concerns being raised by some in the sector, and with projected costs for both the National Retraining Scheme and National Skills Fund yet to be outlined - delegates will discuss: cost expectations sources of funding, including the potential balance of contributions from government, employers, and users. Size and scope Discussing what has been learnt so far from the National Retraining Scheme, with: pilots initially focused towards adults in low-skilled work and occupations susceptible to automation the first phase of the Scheme ahead of full rollout available only to adults aged 24 and older, qualified below degree level, and within a certain wage threshold. Inclusivity What will be needed to develop programmes that: adapt to user needs ensures high take-up secures the involvement of hard-to-reach groups serves those who are otherwise unlikely to receive retraining - particularly those lacking the time, money, and the confidence or necessary skills to retrain. Strategic aims How to achieve the overarching objectives of both the NRS and National Skills Fund, for: creating a culture of retraining and lifelong learning overcoming the barriers that adults face to retraining - looking at the roles of: careers advice and guidance - and how it will need to develop qualifications and awarding bodies. The changing skills landscape following the pandemic With the Government increasingly focusing on digital skills across the spectrum, we expect discussion on: the contribution of the National Retraining Scheme to maintaining and updating the digital literacy of the workforce opportunities for retraining in data science and artificial intelligence skills, with plans for this to be supported by the Adult Learning Technology Innovation Fund the shape that the National Skills Fund should take to support long term skills needs following COVID-19 - including how: the Fund can complement existing support which is available support employers - particularly SMEs how the Government can ensure the best possible return on investment. Broader economic impacts With the National Retraining Scheme and National Skill Funds widely considered as a response to work automation, we also expect discussion on: how the programmes can be designed to combat macro-economic challenges, such as skill shortages, productivity issues, and labour mobility examples of how retraining is being approached outside the UK. Developments that are relevant to the discussion: The first phase of the NRS - in the Liverpool City Region, the West Midlands Combined Authority, the Leeds City Region LEP, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough combined authority area, the Heart of the South West LEP and the North East LEP. The forthcoming Government consultation on the establishment of the National Skills Fund with a report by City and Guilds recently calling for government to release and redirect £3bn in funding assigned for the National Skills Fund to support those that have lost their jobs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The announcement by Government of reforms to Higher Technical qualifications to improve support adults seeking to retrain and upskill, including new qualifications from September 2022 with a Government quality mark. Launch of the new digital service ‘Get Help to Retrain’ last year and the recent issuing by Government of a tender as part of the NRS for groups of employers, providers and local authorities to deliver a new training model in the digital sector with the partnership providing 12 week courses.
  12. News Article
    All medical students at the National University of Singapore will be taught patient safety through a virtual reality (VR) game, a move prompted by the COVID-19 social distancing rules. The game, called PAtient Safety aS Inter-Professional Training (PASS-IT), will use VR to get all 1,500 of them acquainted with the proper procedures in operating theatres. It was developed by the NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (NUS Medicine). The school has 12 such VR stations. Each has a 15-minute game with various medical scenarios that will require the students to "act out" the standard operating procedures. These range from how to check for a patient's consent and verify their identity as well as the correct ways to handle surgical tools and what must be done if a team member accidentally cuts himself. "This VR system is a good tool to help the students consolidate their learning despite increased clinical restrictions," said Associate Professor Alfred Kow, assistant dean of education of NUS Medicine. Read full story Source: The Straits Times, 5 August 2020
  13. News Article
    NHS People Plan provides a stop-gap but leaves glaring omissions 'Two years after it was first promised, the NHS is still waiting for a long-term workforce plan. Some of the measures announced in today’s People Plan are positive. As the plan acknowledges, it is important to learn from the impressive changes made by NHS staff during the pandemic. And improving support for people from black and minority ethnic communities – who make up one fifth of the NHS workforce – is rightly a top priority. 'But there are glaring omissions. The NHS went into the pandemic with a workforce gap of around 100,000 staff, yet the plan does not say how this will be addressed in the medium term. This is particularly concerning at a time when our recruitment of nurses from abroad has dropped dramatically. These details are missing because the NHS is still waiting on government to set out what funding will be available to expand the NHS workforce – without which the NHS cannot recruit and retain the doctors, nurses and other staff it needs. 'While this plan at least provides a stop-gap to help get the NHS through the winter, there is no equivalent plan for social care – a sector suffering from decades of political neglect and the devastating impact of COVID-19 on care users and staff. A comprehensive workforce plan for both the NHS and social care is needed now more than ever'.
  14. News Article
    Lego could be used as a practical tool to train doctors in anesthetic skills according to new research that has shown a simple task using the building bricks can help improve technical skills—a finding that could improve medical training and patient safety. Scientists from the University of Nottingham's School of Psychology and School of Medicine developed a task where people copied shapes using bricks that they could see in a mirror. They found this simple training improved student performance in an ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia task. The results of the study have been published in British Journal of Anesthesia Read the full article here
  15. News Article
    Regulators have uncovered multiple examples of patients being put at risk when junior doctors are left with tasks they are not trained for, lacking support, and facing bullying and inappropriate behaviour. Inspection teams have had to intervene – in some cases contacting senior trust staff – to ensure urgent issues are addressed, after the inspections. Health Education England oversees training nationally, which includes making the checks at trusts which have been put under “enhanced monitoring” by the professional regulator, the General Medical Council, because of concerns from trainees. HSJ has obtained and examined 20 reports, all produced since the beginning of 2019. Themes running through the reports included: Lack of support from consultants. Trainees struggled to contact consultants out of hours. Bullying and inappropriate behaviour was reported at several trusts. Inspectors found a reluctance to report concerns and/or a lack of knowledge of how to do it. Teaching was often of poor quality or cancelled – and sometimes trainees struggled to attend sessions because of how their shifts and rotations were scheduled. Trainees in several trusts reported IT problems, such as being locked out of systems so being unable to access clinical notes and blood tests, and IT systems taking up to 30 minutes to start up, sometimes delaying patient care. Read full story (paywalled) Source: HSJ, 29 June 2020
  16. News Article
    A hospital A&E department has been rated "inadequate" after inspectors found patients at "high risk of avoidable harm". The Care Quality Commission (CQC) reported a "range of regulation breaches" and a shortage of nurses at Stepping Hill hospital's A&E unit. It also criticised maternity and children's services. Stockport NHS Foundation Trust's chief executive said the trust had taken "immediate steps" to improve. The CQC inspected Stepping Hill Hospital in January and February and found A&E performance "had deteriorated significantly" since its last inspection in 2018. Inspectors found shortcomings "relating to patient-centred care, dignity and respect, safe care and treatment, environment and equipment, good governance, and staffing". Their report said the service "could not assure itself that staff were competent for their roles" and patient outcomes "were not always positive or met expectations in line with national standards". Read full story Source: BBC News, 19 May 2020
  17. Content Article
    Nursing and midwifery professionals are at the heart of responding to COVID-19 today, tomorrow and in the coming weeks ahead. We recognise this is undoubtedly the most challenging, difficult and pressurised time in generations for teams working in health and social care settings across the UK. Interventions to help maintain a balanced and positive mental health will be very important during this crisis. It will also be important to ensure they can also focus on the future. Nightingale Frontline will support nurses and midwives to continue to lead and support the NHS now and be inspired to lead beyond this crisis. It will complement the Health and Wellbeing Service recently launched by NHS England. Nightingale Frontline will provide remote, small group sessions offered to: Executive Directors of Nursing Senior Leaders Ward Managers/Team Leaders Newly Registered Nurses/Midwives Nurses/midwives: Redeployed or Returning to practice following retirement or non-clinical roles Nurses/midwives managing caseloads remotely Windrush and BAME Leaders The leadership support will be facilitated by our expert FNF Associate Facilitators and our senior nurse and midwife alumni network who are highly experienced and skilled in a method of Action Learning known as Co-consulting. This approach combines the benefits of coaching with peer learning in an environment underpinned by psychological safety. Book your free leadership support session. Sessions will be released monthly. If you have any questions, please email: academy@florence-nightingale-foundation.org.uk
  18. Content Article
    What can I learn? Introducing power of the patient Tricky conditions: understanding disease, diagnosis and decisions What everyone should know about getting the best care The patient's side of the call for better
  19. Content Article
    This report builds on those of previous years to provide analysis of longer-term trends and insights into the changing NHS staff profile. It focuses specifically on the critical NHS workforce issues that have been repeatedly identified in recent years: nursing shortages, and shortages of staff in general practice and primary care. The report also explores key pressure points: student nurses the international context and international recruitment retention. The report concludes by summarising the key workforce challenges that will need to be considered in the development of the full NHS people plan. Patient Safety Learning's repsonse to the report: This report on NHS workforce trends released by the Health Foundation today includes some really interesting findings, particularly around the changes in the skills mix between nurses and clinical support staff (including health care assistants and nursing assistants). The report states that in 2009/10 there were equal numbers of nurses and support staff, with one clinical support staff member for every FTE nurse in the NHS. In 2018/19, the number of support staff per FTE nurse had risen 10% to 1.1 FTE per nurse. Looking at the numbers, this translated to the NHS employing 6,500 more clinical support staff to doctors, nurses, and midwives, compared to 4,500 more FTE nurses. While changes to ratio of nurses to clinical support staff may reflect changing patient needs, technological advances and other factors, the report also notes concerns that these may be ‘introduced in an unplanned way in response to negative factors – such as cost pressures or recruitment difficulties – rather than positive drivers of improvement’. At Patient Safety Learning we believe to achieve a patient-safe future, patient safety must be more than a priority for an organisation. It must be core to its purpose, reflected in everything that it does. This should apply to the NHS when considering changes in workforce staffing and numbers so that the impact that these may have on patient safety is considered as an intrinsic part of the decision making process. While the report notes that in many cases decisions on skill mix changes are implemented well and evidence led, it’s not clear whether patient safety has been taken into account. Our view is that these decisions should involve a explicit, evidence-based assessment of the impact on patient safety which leads to the selection of the option that offers that safest outcome for patients.
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