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Found 12 results
  1. News Article
    The development of separate emergency units to help acute trusts manage demand during the covid pandemic may risk increasing “discrimination” against mental health patients, a royal college has warned. In a report shared with HSJ, the Royal College of Psychiatrists said separate emergency assessment units being set up by mental health trusts offered a calmer environment for mental health patients and reduced pressure on emergency departments. But the report, based on 54 survey responses from liaison psychiatry teams, also warned there was a “potential to increase the stigmatisation of mental illness by emergency department staff”. It added: “Within a general hospital there is a risk that prejudicial attitudes amongst staff translate into discriminatory behaviour towards patients. The provision of a separate mental health emergency assessment facility on another site may reinforce the erroneous view that the assessment and management of mental health problems is not a role for an emergency department.” Read full story (paywalled) Source: HSJ, 11 August 2020
  2. Content Article
    Contents: Definition of discrimination Why people with a learning disability are at increased risk of discrimination Additional discrimination seen when people have Dementia Definition of Stigma Why stigma is historically a BIG problem in Dementia The importance of challenging stigma to support living well What has been done to tackle stigma? The national ambition for reducing discrimination and stigma How discrimination and stigma can make a person feel Recognising discrimination and stigma in everyday life How to support a person when they are the subject of discrimination or stigma Reporting concerns How you can avoid being discriminatory or stigmatising Combating discrimination and stigma Taking inspiration from the disability movement Education! Education! Education.
  3. News Article
    One in three trainee doctors in Australia have experienced or witnessed bullying, harassment or discrimination in the past 12 months, but just a third have reported it. That's according to a national survey of almost 10,000 trainee doctors released today by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA). The results of the survey, co-developed by the Medical Board of Australia (MBA), send a "loud message" about bullying and harassment to those in the medical profession, said MBA chair Anne Tonkin. "It is incumbent on all of us to heed it," Dr Tonkin said. "We must do this if we are serious about improving the culture of medicine." "Bullying, harassment and discrimination are not good for patient safety, constructive learning or the culture of medicine," Dr Tonkin continued. "We must all redouble our efforts to strengthen professional behaviour and deal effectively with unacceptable behaviour." Read full story Source: ABC News, 10 February 2020
  4. News Article
    Incoming Health Education England chief executive Navina Evans said the momentum created by the death of George Floyd and the Black Lives Matter movement meant there was now increased “pressure on white leaders” to act on racism and discrimination in the service. Dr Evans praised a letter written by Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health Foundation Trust chief executive Roisin Fallon-Williams, in which she admitted to being “culpable” and “complicit” in failing to fully understand the inequality and discrimination faced by people with black, Asian or other minority ethnic backgrounds. “That was great to see, and as you can see from the reactions to her letter people were really, really pleased to have it acknowledged,” she said. However, Dr Evans added: “As well as that [acknowledgement] there needs to be action”. Read full story Source: HSJ, 22 June 2020
  5. News Article
    Factors such as racism and social inequality may have contributed to increased risks of black, Asian and minority communities catching and dying from COVID-19, a leaked report says. Historic racism may mean that people are less likely to seek care or to demand better personal protective equipment, says the Public Health England (PHE) draft, seen by the BBC. Other possible factors include risks linked to occupation and inequalities in conditions such as diabetes may increase disease severity. The report, the second by PHE on the subject, pointed to racism and discrimination as a root cause affecting health and the risk of both exposure to the virus and becoming seriously ill. It said stakeholders expressed "deep dismay, anger, loss and fear in their communities" as data emerged suggesting COVID-19 was "exacerbating existing inequalities". And it found "historic racism and poorer experiences of healthcare or at work" meant individuals in BAME groups were less likely to seek care when needed or to speak up when they had concerns about personal protective equipment or risk. The report concluded: "The unequal impact of COVID-19 on BAME communities may be explained by a number of factors ranging from social and economic inequalities, racism, discrimination and stigma, occupational risk, inequalities in the prevalence of conditions that increase the severity of disease including obesity, diabetes, hypertension and asthma." Read full story Source: BBC News, 13 June 2020
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