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Found 28 results
  1. News Article
    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge for modern medicine as more naturally occurring antimicrobials are needed to tackle infections capable of resisting treatments currently in use. New research from the University of Warwick has investigated natural remedies to fill the gap in the antibiotic market, taking their cue from a 1,000-year-old text known as Bald's Leechbook. Read the full article here.
  2. Content Article
    My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene The My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene approach defines the key moments when healthcare workers should perform hand hygiene. This evidence-based, field-tested, user-centred approach is designed to be easy to learn, logical and applicable in a wide range of settings. This approach recommends health-care workers to clean their hands: before touching a patient, before clean/aseptic procedures, after body fluid exposure/risk, after touching a patient, and after touching patient surroundings.
  3. News Article
    Calls for immediate compensation for thousands of victims contaminated by infected NHS blood have been rejected by ministers at a meeting with campaigners and survivors – but more health support may be made available. Despite one person dying every four days on average from HIV, hepatitis C or other conditions, the government on Tuesday turned down a request for a national compensation scheme. There are estimated to be between 5,000 and 7,000 victims still alive who acquired viral infections through transfusions from the health service. Many are haemophiliacs who need regular transfusions to help their blood clot. Products supplied by the NHS in the 1970s and 1980s came from the US using blood obtained from prisoners and drug addicts who were paid for their donations. Imported products were inadequately screened. Read full story Source: The Guardian, 28 January 2020
  4. News Article
    One in five deaths around the world is caused by sepsis, also known as blood poisoning, shows the most comprehensive analysis of the condition. The report estimates 11 million people a year are dying from sepsis - more than are killed by cancer. The researchers at the University of Washington said the "alarming" figures were double previous estimates. Most cases were in poor and middle income countries, but even wealthier nations are dealing with sepsis. There has been a big push within the health service to identify the signs of sepsis more quickly and to begin treatment. The challenge is to get better at identifying patients with sepsis in order to treat them before it is too late. Early treatment with antibiotics or anti-virals to clear an infection can make a massive difference. Prof Mohsen Naghavi said: "We are alarmed to find sepsis deaths are much higher than previously estimated, especially as the condition is both preventable and treatable. We need renewed focus on sepsis prevention among newborns and on tackling antimicrobial resistance, an important driver of the condition." Read full story Source: BBC News, 17 January 2020
  5. Content Article
    The top five factors for the contamination were: inadequate cleaning before sterilisation (34%) immediate-use steam sterilisation (also known as flash sterilisation) issues (12%) holes in wrappers (11%) instruments not sterilised in time for case (10%) vendor instrument issue (9%). Of the events in which inadequate cleaning before sterilisation was identified as a factor, the instruments were identified as the following (percentages do not add up to 100% because of rounding): Complex instrument (39%) Cannulated or lumened instrument (35%) Simple noncomplex instrument (9%) Other or unidentified (16%). ECRI Institute PSO recommends the following: Emphasise to all personnel involved in reprocessing (cleaning and disinfection or sterilisation) reusable medical devices—including clinical and central sterile department staff—that omitting any of the cleaning steps in the reprocessing protocol can lead to deadly infections. Assess the organisation's reprocessing program to identify and rectify factors that could contribute to poor instrument cleaning. Review reprocessing procedures to ensure that they are comprehensive and easily accessible to all personnel involved in the cleaning process. Review procedures periodically to confirm that they are aligned with current manufacturer recommendations for cleaning. Review compliance with reprocessing procedures to ensure that they are being following appropriately and that fail-safes are in place to prevent contaminated instruments from reaching the field or patient. Assess competency on an ongoing basis, and provide refresher training at regular intervals to help staff sustain competency. The U.S. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that training be provided at least once a year (CDC 2015). Prevent productivity pressures from forcing staff to deviate from the cleaning instructions for the instruments at hand. Seek input from reprocessing staff when assessing new instruments for purchase. Foster regular communication between reprocessing staff and the clinical departments they support.
  6. News Article
    Hospital wards across the country are having to look after an unsafe number of patients, with hundreds of beds closed due to an outbreak of norovirus. NHS England has said that on average almost 900 beds were closed each day during the week to Sunday 15 December. Hospitals have reported fewer empty beds with bed-occupancy rates reaching as high as 95 per cent, 10 per cent higher than the recommended safe level. Read full story Source: The Independent, 20 December 2019
  7. News Article
    A hospital trust believes it is the first in the UK to introduce disposable sterile headscarves for staff to use in operating theatres. Junior doctor Farah Roslan, who is Muslim, had the idea during her training at the Royal Derby Hospital. She said it came following infection concerns related to her hijab that she had been wearing throughout the day. It is hoped the items can be introduced nationally but NHS England said it would be up to individual trusts. Ms Roslan looked to Malaysia, the country of her birth, for ideas before creating a design and testing fabrics. "I'm really happy and looking forward to seeing if we can endorse this nationally," she said. Consultant surgeon Gill Tierney, who mentored Ms Roslan, said the trust was the first to introduce the headscarves in the UK. "We know it's a quiet, silent, issue around theatres around the country and I don't think it has been formally addressed," she said. Read full story Source: BBC News, 19 December 2019
  8. Content Article
    The aim of the audit was to assess the standard of care provided to patients with lower leg ulceration and to understand who provides care and where this care is provided. The specific objectives within the audit were: To ascertain the number of people presenting with lower leg ulceration. To assess the standard of care provided to people with lower leg ulceration. To assess the provision and uptake of training amongst health care professionals. To determine if health and social care trusts have policies and documentation in place for the treatment of lower leg ulceration. To provide information to assist in establishing regional best practice guideline and care standards for the delivery of lower leg ulceration in Northern Ireland.
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