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Found 22 results
  1. Content Article
    You can use stakeholder analysis to: Identify who your stakeholders are; this is anyone who has interest in the improvement project or will be impacted by any changes. Use the opinions of your stakeholders to help define your improvement work at an early stage and gain their support. Guide the development of a communication plan for stakeholders to help them understand what the improvement work is about, to maintain and build further support for it where possible. Identify potential issues which could arise as the project develops, identifying ways to manage negative impacts.
  2. Content Article
    Topics include: reasonable adjustments for people with learning difficulties and autism when they come into hospital hospital gowns and how it may make some people feel patient engagement online support groups.
  3. Community Post
    At Barnsley Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, they have introduced a 'Wobble room' . This is where staff can take time out, relax before heading back into clinical work again.
  4. Content Article
    The NHS Patient Safety Strategy, published in June 2019, sets out three strategic aims around Insight, Involvement and Improvement which will enable it to achieve its safety vision. It defines the Involvement aim as ‘equipping patients, staff and partners with the skills and opportunities to improve patient safety throughout the whole system’. A key action associated with this is a proposal to create Patient Safety Specialists within each NHS organisation in England. The strategy explains that ‘giving everyone in the NHS a foundation level understanding of patient safety is critical, but we also need experts to lead on safety in their own organisations’.NHS England and NHS Improvement have published draft Patient Safety Specialist requirements for public consultation. Patient Safety Learning welcome any increase in patient safety capacity and expertise in the NHS and have provided specific feedback on the draft requirements for this role. In our response we identify several areas where we believe these can be improved, including the following points: Patient Safety Specialists having a clear and direct reporting line to a named executive director on the Board with an assigned patient safety role and to a non-executive director with a similar role. Ensuring that the requirements identify key relationships for the role holders not identified in the draft document: Medical Examiners, Coroners, Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch, Governors, Non-Executive Board Members, HR Directors and NHS Resolution. Including a requirement that Patient Safety Specialists should demonstrate that they have the right skills and experience to work with patients, families and their carers on patient safety issues. They should also show that they can support their organisation to engage effectively in co-production with these groups. The need to strengthen the requirements for the individuals holding these roles to have knowledge and experience of: Investigations, Complaints, Just Culture, Systems Thinking and Human Factors. Giving consideration to how Patient Safety Specialists will engage with frontline staff, who are notable by their lack of reference in the draft requirements.
  5. News Article
    On January 2020, Patient Safety will be on the G20 agenda (among other five health key priorities), but Abdulelah M. Alhawsawi, Saudi Patient Safety Center, asks "what is patient safety doing on an economic forum like the G20?" Patient harm is estimated to be the 14th leading cause of the global disease burden. This is comparable to medical conditions such as tuberculosis and malaria. In both US and Canada, patient safety adverse events represent the 3rd leading cause of death, preceded only by cancer and heart disease. In the US alone, 440,000 patients die annually from healthcare associated infections. In Canada, there are more than 28,000 deaths a year due to patient safety adverse events. In low-middle income countries, 134 million adverse events take place every year, resulting in 2.6 million deaths annually. In addition to lives lost and harm inflicted, unsafe medical practice results in money loss. Nearly, 15 % of the health expenditure across Organization of Economic Cooperative Development countries is attributed to patient safety failures each year, but if we add the indirect and opportunity cost (economic and social), the cost of harm could amount to trillions of dollars globally. When a patient is harmed, the country loses twice. The individual will be lost as a revenue generating source for society and the individual will become a burden on the healthcare system because he or she will require more treatment. Unless we do something different about patient safety, we would risk the sustainability of healthcare systems and the overall economies. Alhawsaw proposed establishing a G20 Patient Safety Network (Group) that will combine Safety experts from healthcare and other leading industries (like aviation, nuclear, oil and gas, other), and economy and fFinancial experts This will function as a platform to prioritise and come up with innovative patient safety solutions to solve global challenges while highlighting the return on investment (ROI) aspects. This multidisciplinary group of experts can work with each state that adopts the addressed global challenge to ensure correct implementation of proposed solution. Read full story Source: The G20 Health & Development Partnersip, 10 February 2020
  6. Content Article
    What topics will you cover? Complexity and quality improvement in health and social care Quality improvement theory: the Model for Improvement, an introduction to LEAN, an introduction to microsystems Evaluating quality improvement: the lens of profound knowledge, measuring for improvement Engagement and co-production Systems modelling and quality improvement: modelling for demand and capacity problems and computer simulation modelling Making the case for quality improvement. This course has been accredited by the CPD Certification Service, which means it can be used to provide evidence of your continuing professional development. This course is FREE and available for you to complete with in 8 weeks.
  7. News Article
    This week is Patient Safety Awareness Week, an annual recognition event intended to encourage everyone to learn more about healthcare safety. During this week, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) seeks to advance important discussions locally and globally, and inspire action to improve the safety of the health care system — for patients and the workforce. Patient Safety Awareness Week serves as a dedicated time and platform for growing awareness about patient safety and recognising the work already being done. Although there has been real progress made in patient safety over the past two decades, current estimates cite medical harm as a leading cause of death worldwide. The World Health Organization estimates that 134 million adverse events occur each year due to unsafe care in hospitals in low- and middle-income countries, resulting in some 2.6 million deaths. Additionally, some 40 percent of patients experience harm in ambulatory and primary care settings with an estimated 80 percent of these harms being preventable, according to WHO. Some studies suggest that as many as 400,000 deaths occur in the United States each year as a result of errors or preventable harm. Not every case of harm results in death, yet they can cause long-term impact on the patient's physical health, emotional health, financial well-being, or family relationships. Preventing harm in healthcare settings is a public health concern. Everyone interacts with the health care system at some point in life. And everyone has a role to play in advancing safe healthcare. Learn more about IHI's work to advance patient safety.
  8. Content Article
    To use the tool, you just need to enter your height and weight into the online calculator, along with your height and weight 3-6 months ago. You will be given a rating that will tell you if you are at high, medium or low risk of malnutrition. You will then be able to download a dietary advice sheet that gives basic information and suggestions for improving nutritional intake. If you are worried about your weight or having difficulty eating, make sure you talk to your GP or a healthcare professional. The dietary advice sheet was developed in partnership with a number of professional organisations. NB this site is intended for adult self-screening only.
  9. Content Article
    NHS Improvement are asking NHS organisations to identify, by June 2020, at least one person from their existing employees as their patient safety specialist. Training for these specialists will be based on the national patient safety syllabus being developed with Health Education England. Working with representatives from a few NHS trusts, patient safety partners (patient and public voice representatives) and clinical commissioning groups, NHS Improvement have drafted the requirements for a patient safety specialist to help organisations identify the most appropriate person(s) for the role. You can download the draft requirements here. NHS Improvement are inviting comments and feedback on this through their survey which can be accesed via the link at the bottom of this page. Consultation closes 12 March 2020.
  10. News Article
    The NHS is spending millions of pounds encouraging patients to give feedback but the information gained is not being used effectively to improve services, experts have warned. Widespread collection of patient comments is often “disjointed and standalone” from efforts to improve the quality of care, according to a study by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). Nine separate studies of how hospitals collect and use feedback were analysed. They showed that while thousands of patients give hospitals their comments, their reports are often reduced to simple numbers – and in many cases, the NHS lacks the ability to analyse and act on the results. The research found the NHS had a “managerial focus on bad experiences” meaning positive comments on what went well were “overlooked”. The NIHR report said: “A lot of resource and energy goes into collecting feedback data but less into analysing it in ways that can lead to change, or into sharing the feedback with staff who see patients on a day-to-day basis. NHS England's chief nurse, Ruth May, said: "Listening to patient experience is key to understanding our NHS and there is more that that we can hear to improve it. This research gives insight into how data can be analysed and used by frontline staff to make changes that patients tell us are needed." Read full story Source: 13 January 2020
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