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Found 162 results
  1. Content Article
    This study highlights that people with complex concerns with a history of placement breakdowns and past institutionalisation can be settled successfully and safely in local communities. However, it is difficult for many of them to achieve a satisfactory quality of life long term. The obligation for this lies with service providers to provide adequate support to overcome that difficulty.
  2. Content Article
    "In one of the most vivid scenes in the Home Box Office (HBO) miniseries 'Chernobyl' (among many vivid scenes), soldiers dressed in leather smocks ran out into radioactive areas to literally shovel radioactive material out of harm's way. Horrifically under-protected, they suited up anyway. In another scene, soldiers fashioned genital protection from scrap metal out of desperation while being sent to other hazardous areas. Please don't tell me that in the richest country in the world in the 21st century, I'm supposed to work in a fictionalized Soviet-era disaster zone and fashion my own face mask out of cloth because other Americans hoard supplies for personal use and so-called leaders sit around in meetings hearing themselves talk. I ran to a bedside the other day to intubate a crashing, likely COVID, patient. Two respiratory therapists and two nurses were already at the bedside. That's 5 N95s masks, 5 gowns, 5 face shields and 10 gloves for one patient at one time. I saw probably 15-20 patients that shift, if we are going to start rationing supplies, what percentage should I wear precautions for? Make no mistake, the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) is loosening these guidelines because our country is not prepared. Loosening guidelines increases healthcare workers' risk but the decision is done to allow us to keep working, not to keep us safe. It is done for the public benefit – so I can continue to work no matter the personal cost to me or my family (and my healthcare family). Sending healthcare workers to the front line asking them to cover their face with a bandana is akin to sending a soldier to the front line in a t-shirt and flip flops. I don't want talk. I don't want assurances. I want action. I want boxes of N95s piling up, donated from the people who hoarded them. I want non-clinical administrators in the hospital lining up in the ER asking if they can stock shelves to make sure that when I need to rush into a room, the drawer of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) I open isn't empty. I want them showing up in the ER asking 'how can I help' instead of offering shallow 'plans' conceived by someone who has spent far too long in an ivory tower and not long enough in the trenches. Maybe they should actually step foot in the trenches. I want billion-dollar companies like 3M halting all production of any product that isn't PPE to focus on PPE manufacturing. I want a company like Amazon, with its logistics mastery (it can drop a package to your door less than 24 hours after ordering it), halting its 2-day delivery of 12 reams of toilet paper to whoever is willing to pay the most in order to help get the available PPE supply distributed fast and efficiently in a manner that gets the necessary materials to my brothers and sisters in arms who need them. I want Proctor and Gamble, and the makers of other soaps and detergents, stepping up too. We need detergent to clean scrubs, hospital linens and gowns. We need disinfecting wipes to clean desk and computer surfaces. What about plastics manufacturers? Plastic gowns aren't some high-tech device, they are long shirts/smocks... made out of plastic. Get on it. Face shields are just clear plastic. Nitrile gloves? Yeah, they are pretty much just gloves... made from something that isn't apparently Latex. Let's go. Money talks in this country. Executive millionaires, why don't you spend a few bucks to buy back some of these masks from the hoarders, and drop them off at the nearest hospital. I love biotechnology and research but we need to divert viral culture media for COVID testing and research. We need biotechnology manufacturing ready and able to ramp up if and when treatments or vaccines are developed. Our Botox supply isn't critical, but our antibiotic supply is. We need to be able to make more plastic Endotracheal tubes, not more silicon breast implants. Let's see all that. Then we can all talk about how we played our part in this fight. Netflix and chill is not enough while my family, friends and colleagues are out there fighting. Our country won two world wars because the entire country mobilised. We out-produced and we out-manufactured while our soldiers out-fought the enemy. We need to do that again because make no mistake, we are at war, healthcare worker s are your soldiers, and the war has just begun." First published on www.telegram.com/news
  3. Content Article
    This issue of Hindsight includes articles on: Malicious compliance by Sidney Dekker Can we ever imagine how work is done? by Erik Hollnagel Safety is in the eye of the beholder by Florence-Marie Jegoux, Ludovic Mieusset and Sébastien Follet I wouldn't have done what they did by Martin Bromiley
  4. Content Article
    In this article they use this case to highlight the importance of analysing errors using a systems approach. James Reasons 'Swiss cheese model of medical errors' is explained and put into context.
  5. Community Post
    Do any areas of healthcare capture ALL near misses and act on them? What systems do you use?
  6. Content Article
    The review will summarise the literature relating to contributory factors to patient safety incidents in primary care. The findings from this review will provide an evidence-based contributory factors framework for use in the primary care setting. It will increase understanding of factors that contribute to patient safety incidents and ultimately improve quality of healthcare.
  7. Content Article
    The tools will help you examine how tests are managed in your office, from the moment tests are ordered until the patient is notified of the test results and the appropriate follow up is determined.
  8. News Article
    China has introduced a new law with the aim of preventing violence against medical workers. The announcement comes days after a female doctor was stabbed to death at a Beijing hospital. The law bans any organisation or individual from threatening or harming the personal safety or dignity of medical workers, according to state media. It will take effect on 1 June next year. Under the new law, those "disturbing the medical environment, or harming medical workers' safety and dignity" will be given administrative punishments such as detention or a fine. It will also punish people found illegally obtaining, using or disclosing people's private healthcare information. Read full story Source: BBC News, 29 December 2019
  9. Content Article
    About the authors Robert W. Proctor is a distinguished professor of Psychological Sciences at Purdue University. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, Association for Psychological Science, and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, and recipient of the Franklin V. Taylor Award for Outstanding Contributions in the Field of Applied Experimental/Engineering Psychology from Division 21 of the American Psychological Association in 2013. He is co-author of Stimulus-Response Compatibility: Data, Theory and Application, Skill Acquisition & Training, and co-editor of Handbook of Human Factors in Web Design. Trisha Van Zandt is a professor of Psychology at The Ohio State University. She is a member of the Society for Mathematical Psychology, of which she was President in 2006-2007, and the American Statistical Association. She has received multiple research grants from the National Science Foundation and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 1997. She is co-author of review chapters "Designs for and Analyses of Response Time Experiments" in the Oxford Handbook of Quantitative Methods and "Mathematical Psychology" in the APA Handbook of Research Methods in Psychology.
  10. Content Article
    This article from Nursing Open, published here by Wiley Online Library, aims to investigate whether nurse reported teamwork with physicians was associated with patient perceived consistency in staff‐to‐patient communication.
  11. Content Article
    Wrong tooth extraction has been clearly designated as a 'never event' since April 2015. However, in 2016/17, wrong tooth extraction topped the charts as being the most frequently occurring never event based on NHS England’s data. What can we do to mitigate these incidents? Based on both practical experience and research evidence, BAOS advises that the main methods for mitigation of errors are: learning from mistakes – including investigation and root cause analysis engaging the clinical team when developing 'correct site surgery' policies utilising the LocSSIPs template and guidelines from NHS England/RCS England developing a correct site surgery checklist that is appropriate for your clinical environment providing training for staff on the use of the checklist ensuring that the checklist is being used correctly through active audits of the processes involved supporting the clinical team throughout the process and not taking punitive action when incidents do occur.
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