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Found 91 results
  1. Content Article
    In this study from Timmel et al., CUSP was implemented beginning in February 2008 on an 18-bed surgical floor at an academic medical center to improve patient safety, nurse/physician collaboration, and safety on the unit. This unit admits three to six patients per day from up to eight clinical services. Improvements were observed in safety climate, teamwork climate, and nurse turnover rates on a surgical inpatient unit after implementing a safety programme. As part of the CUSP process, staff described safety hazards and then as a team designed and implemented several interventions. CUSP is sufficiently structured to provide a strategy for health care organizations to improve culture and learn from mistakes, yet is flexible enough for units to focus on risks that they perceive as most important, given their context. Broad use of this program throughout health systems could arguably produce substantial improvements in patient safety.
  2. Content Article
    Learn about CUSP Assemble the Team Engage the Senior Executive Understand the Science of Safety Identify Defects Through Sensemaking Implement Teamwork and Communication Apply CUSP The Role of the Nurse Manager Spread Patient and Family Engagement Learn about CUSP Assemble the Team Engage the Senior Executive Understand the Science of Safety Identify Defects Through Sensemaking Implement Teamwork and Communication Apply CUSP The Role of the Nurse Manager Spread Patient and Family Engagement
  3. Event
    OSHAfrica (an Occupational health and safety site that spans the whole of Africa, based in Lagos) has now created OSHversity. This will provide training for people in workplace safety, regardless of their location and type of workplace. Joinn session using this link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUkcu-upzojHdA2-ZT9MFJe1UDY9lzqJYr7 Register for the session by emailing info@oshversity.com You can find out more about the courses offered by going to www.oshversity.com
  4. Content Article
    According to the responses we received, the four themes that became most obvious - the four things you think staff most need to be safe - are: Compassionate leaders and role models who prioritise their staff’s wellbeing A respectful, supportive team with good communication and united by a common purpose A safe and just culture that invites staff to speak up Psychological safety, protecting staff form burnout
  5. Content Article
    Research shows that patient complaints are significantly associated with physicians' risk management activity and lawsuits. Research also demonstrates that a small subset of physicians and surgeons in various areas of practice are associated with disproportionate shares of patient complaints. Coded and aggregated patient complaint data therefore offer a metric for identifying and promoting behavior change. Analysis of the distribution of patient complaints associated with 41 paediatric cardiac surgeons is presented as a means for helping leaders show one surgeon how her/his risk status compares with peers. The paper describes a specific plan and reliable process by which medical group/centre colleagues and leaders may: address lapses in professionalism and performance; follow-up to promote professionalism, professional accountability, quality, and a safety culture; and reduce risk.
  6. Content Article
    Seven features of safety in maternity units 1. Commitment to safety and improvement at all levels, with everyone involved 2. Technical competence, supported by formal training and informal learning 3. Teamwork, cooperation, and positive working relationships 4. Constant reinforcing of safe, ethical, and respectful behaviours 5. Multiple problem-sensing systems, used as basis of action 6. Systems and processes designed for safety, and regularly reviewed and optimised 7. Effective coordination and ability to mobilise quickly
  7. Content Article
    Patient Safety Tool Box Talks© Theme 1 talks - Person centred care and supportre and Support Patient Safety Tool Box Talks© Theme 2 talks - Effective care and support Patient Safety Tool Box Talks© Theme 3 talks - Safe care and support Patient Safety Tool Box Talks© Theme 5 talks - Leadership, governance and management Patient Safety Tool Box Talks© Theme 8 talks - Use of information
  8. Content Article
    Project charters are written documents that come in many forms. For improvement projects, they should include, as a minimum, a concise summary of: What the team wants to achieve from their improvement efforts, described as an improvement aim. Include how much improvement will be achieved, who the improvement is for and when the improvement will be achieved by. Why the work is important – the rationale or business case for the work. This should outline; the problem the work will address, how this links to strategic objectives, how you know this is a problem, who is affected, the impact of doing nothing and the benefits to be derived from improvement e.g. outcomes and costs. The scope of the project - what is included in the work. How the team intend to achieve the improvement aim – this should include initial ideas for change and the supporting activities to make the work happen. How the team will measure the impact of the work. Who will be involved the work and their role. Key people should include; subject matter experts, process owners who can make changes, representatives of those impacted by your project (families, young people, patients, customers etc), finance representative (where needed), and a sponsor linked to executive level for leadership support. Any risks to the delivery of the project, so that decisions can be made on how these should be addressed.
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