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Clive Flashman

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About Clive Flashman

  • Rank
    Starter

Profile Information

  • First name
    Clive
  • Last name
    Flashman
  • Country
    United Kingdom

About me

  • About me
    I'm leading on the development of the hub for Patient Safety Learning. I have a background in patient safety, having worked at the National Patient Safety Agency from 2002 to 2007, designing and leading the development of the NRLS. So looking forward to sharing this bold expriment with you all!!
  • Organisation
    Patient Safety Learning
  • Role
    Chief Digital Officer

Recent Profile Visitors

445 profile views
  1. News Article
    Initial survey findings show the long road to recovery for people who have faced COVID at home without going into hospital New survey findings from over 1,000 people show that those recovering from mild-moderate COVID are struggling for weeks with symptoms, raising concerns that there is not adequate support for people who have not been in hospital with the illness. The ongoing survey is being run by Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation, through their post-COVID HUB, which they set up, alongside a helpline and WhatsApp service, to support anyone left with breathing difficulties after COVID. Read full article here
  2. Community Post
    Hi @Mary-Jo Patterson, only members can post into the community spaces, and as you know - membership is free. To invite your colleagues to become members if they aren't already, send them this link in an email: https://www.pslhub.org/register/ Then, once they are members, you can send them the link below to invite them to comment here: “https://www.pslhub.org/forums/topic/40-ccg-patient-safety-managers” KInd regards, Clive
  3. Content Article
    Michael was diagnosed with Crohn's disease at the age of 12 and had his first operation at 14. He died last weekend and was the same age as me. Our daughters were in the same year at secondary school together, and we got to know each other that way at first and then through our mutual interest in health care. When he awoke from an operation to discover he had a stoma bag, he didn't wallow. He bought items online to make it a 'smart' stoma bag to be able to get an alert when it was near full and provide useful data to his medical consultants. This was the type of person he was. Whenever I needed help in anything and asked him, he would unconditionally do everything he could to help, and never failed to deliver – I wish I had been able to do more for him. When he realised that thousands of other patients would be able to benefit from his smart ostomy bag, he tried to get innovation funding to develop and manufacture it at scale for the NHS. He tried over 40 times and received over 40 rejections. People on the other side of the Atlantic were able to see what the NHS couldn't, and 11 Health (he was the 11th person to have a bowel transplant) moved to the West Coast of the USA and grew quickly. He was 'patient in residence' at Stanford Medical school, one of the first such roles in the world. With the clinicians at Stanford, they created the Everyone Included programme, a joint initiative between clinicians and patients which as he described it is "a framework for healthcare innovation, implementation and transformation based on principles of mutual respect and inclusivity". He mentioned this and his journey as a patient in his Ted X talk in 2018. In that talk, he calls for a Chief Patient Officer to work with healthcare execs in co-designing new services for patients or improving existing services. Involving patients in this sort of work is a key foundation for safer healthcare systems. This is not a non-exec role, it is not an arms length committee tick box role. It is a role that can have a profound effect on the ways that services are delivered to patients. It is hugely important and no UK care providers has anyone like this on their exec teams. If you know different, please comment on it below. I think it is about time that a movement to appoint Chief Patient Officers into Trusts was started, don't you? See here for a detailed interview with Michael in 2018: https://www.highland-marketing.com/interviews/hm-interview-michael-seres/
  4. News Article
    The UK's scientists have been trying to trace COVID-19's path through the population ever since the coronavirus arrived on British shores. In what is thought to be the largest study of its kind in the world, an app developed by King's College London (KCL) and technology company Zoe, which tracks symptoms of the disease, has been downloaded more than three million times in the UK. Not to be confused with the government's contact-tracing app, the COVID-19 Symptom Study app allows users to report daily whether they feel healthy, and record any symptoms. The scientists have been using the data to estimate how the virus may have travelled through the population. Read full story Source: BBC News, 23 May 2020
  5. News Article
    "I'm not sure I want to be a nurse anymore," she tells me. "I've seen more people die in the past two months than in the whole six years." Some 70% of health workers dealing with COVID-19 in Italy's hardest-hit areas are suffering from burnout, a recent study shows. "This is actually the hardest moment for doctors and nurses," says Serena Barello, the author of the study. Read story Source: BBC News, 26 May 2020
  6. News Article
    Retailers in England selling home antibody tests, including Superdrug and Babylon, have been told to stop sending them out, and labs must not process them, while the regulatory body (Public Health England) examines how well they work. Read story Source: The Guardian, 27 May 2020
  7. Community Post
    @Ken Spearpointbearing in mind your recent share on here, what is your view on this?
  8. Content Article Comment
    This is something that the RCGP ought to be giving some guidance on really
  9. News Article
    A new app has been piloted in North East London to help district nurses document chronic wound management more efficiently. The tech has been used in community services and stores a catalogue of photographs to accurately document chronic wounds. District nurses can use the app on a smartphone – making it lightweight, portable and easy to clean. Using two calibration stickers placed either side of the wound, the app can scan it and capture its size and depth to build a 3D image. Nurses can then fill out further characteristics on the software such as colour, pain level, location and smell to give a full picture of the wound’s development. Read full story Source: Nursing Times, 12 February 2020
  10. News Article
    London doctors are using artificial intelligence to predict which patients with chest pains are at greatest risk of death. A trial at Barts Heart Centre, in Smithfield, and the Royal Free Hospital, in Hampstead, found that poor blood flow was a “strong predictor” of heart attack, stroke and heart failure. Doctors used computer programmes to analyse images of the heart from more than 1,000 patients and cross-referenced the scans with their health over the next two years. The computers were “taught” to search for indicators of future “adverse cardiovascular outcomes” and are now used in a real-time basis to help doctors identify who is most at risk. Read full story Source: Evening Standard, 15 February 2020
  11. News Article
    Smartphone apps designed to detect the risk of skin cancer are poorly regulated and “frequently cannot be relied upon to produce accurate results”, according to a new analysis. They found the apps may cause harm from failure to identify potentially deadly skin cancers, or from over-investigation of false positive results such as removing a harmless mole unnecessarily. Read full story Source: Digital Health, 14 February 2020
  12. News Article
    The Doctors’ Association UK has compiled stories from 602 frontline doctors which expose a startling culture of bullying and overwork in the NHS. The stories include: a pregnant doctor who fainted after being forced to stand up for 15 hours straight and being denied water. The junior doctor was subsequently shouted at in front of colleagues and patients on regaining consciousness and told it was her choice to be pregnant and that ‘no allowances would be made’. a doctor who told us that a junior doctor hung themselves in a cupboard whilst on shift and was not found for 3 days as no-one had looked for them. His junior doctor colleagues were not allowed to talk about his suicide and it was all ‘hushed up’. a doctor who was denied a change of clothes into scrubs after having a miscarriage at work despite her trousers being soaked in blood. Full press release
  13. Community Post
    Below is an interesting blog from the mum of a cancer patient detailing the horrendous time they had, having to deal with the fragmented information held by various clinicians about their child's health. The 'Cancer mum' makes a very good case for needing a single longitudinal record, and how this would contribute to patient safety. https://cancermumblog.wordpress.com/2019/04/19/cancer-mum-so-why-do-patients-and-carers-want-health-records/ We often hear about the safety issues with the use of electronic health records, so this is an interesting opposing perspective. What do you think?
  14. News Article
    There is always a lot happening with patient safety in the NHS (National Health Service) in England. Sadly, all too often patient safety crises events occur. The NHS is also no sloth when it comes to the production of patient safety policies, reports, and publications. These generally provide excellent information and are very well researched and produced. Unfortunately, some of these can be seen to falter at the NHS local hospital implementation stage and some reports get parked or forgotten. This is evident from the failure of the NHS to develop an ingrained patient safety culture over the years. Some patient safety progress has been made, but not enough when the history of NHS policy making in the area is analysed. Lessons going unlearnt from previous patient safety event crises is also an acute problem. Patient safety events seem to repeat themselves with the same attendant issues. Read full story Source: Harvard Law, 17 February 2020
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