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Found 163 results
  1. News Article
    Diminishing rates of measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) jabs have prompted a Royal College warning over the risks to pregnant women, as the NHS raises concerns over London “lagging” behind the national uptake. The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health’s immunisations lead, Dr Helen Bradford, said the falling uptake of the MMR vaccine could present a serious risk to pregnant women and their unborn children. The warning comes as London health authorities are planning a major summer drive to improve uptake in the capital, The Independent has learned. Documents seen by The In
  2. News Article
    The UK needs to do more to use diagnostic testing in the fight against antimicrobial resistance (AMR), the chair of a government-commissioned review on AMR told MPs. Lord O’Neill, an economist and former treasury minister, warned in the review’s final report in 2016 that a continued rise in AMR would lead to 10 million people dying each year by 2050 and made ten recommendations, including the need for rapid diagnostics to reduce unnecessary use of antimicrobials. Speaking to a Commons Science and Technology Committee evidence session on 22 June 2022, Lord O’Neill said that while he w
  3. News Article
    The NHS is urgently tracking down the parents of 35,000 five-year-old children in London who are not fully vaccinated against polio. Health officials are hoping to contain the spread of the virus after detecting the first outbreak since 1984. They are trying to trace it back to a “single household or street” after identifying polio in a sewage plant serving four million people in northeast London. Experts are concerned polio, which had been eradicated in Britain in the 1980s, could take off again due to relatively low vaccination uptake in London. Latest NHS data shows 101,
  4. News Article
    A clinical trial to test pregnant women for Group B Strep (GBS) – the most common cause of life-threatening infection in newborn babies – will fail unless the Government intervenes, experts have warned. Some 80 hospitals are needed for the trial to go ahead but only 32 have committed to it, with a deadline for registering of September. The trial is being funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and will look at whether testing women for Group B Strep reduces the risk of babies dying or suffering harm. Now Dr Jane Plumb, chief executive of Group B Strep Support
  5. News Article
    Cases of monkeypox are being investigated in European countries, including the UK as well as the US, Canada and Australia. Monkeypox is caused by the monkeypox virus, a member of the same family of viruses as smallpox, although it is much less severe and experts say chances of infection are low. It occurs mostly in remote parts of central and west African countries, near tropical rainforests. There are two main strains of virus - west African and central African. Two of the infected patients in the UK travelled from Nigeria, so it is likely that they are suffering from the
  6. News Article
    Respiratory syncytial virus is killing 100,000 children under the age of five every year worldwide, new figures reveal as experts say the global easing of coronavirus restrictions is causing a surge in cases. RSV is the most common cause of acute lower respiratory infection in young children. It spreads easily via coughing and sneezing. There is no vaccine or specific treatment. RSV-attributable acute lower respiratory infections led to more than 100,000 deaths of children under five in 2019, according to figures published in the Lancet. Of those, more than 45,000 were under six mont
  7. News Article
    Parents whose children have mysteriously fallen ill with hepatitis and received a delayed diagnosis could be entitled to negligence claims, lawyers believe. Officials are no closer to explaining a recent and unusual outbreak in cases of liver inflammation recorded among young children across the UK. To date, a total of 163 children have been diagnosed. Eleven of these have received liver transplants, while 13 are currently in hospital. Globally in recent months, 300 children have been struck down by the illness, which has no clear cause. Because the UK cases have been identified
  8. News Article
    UK health officials say they are still no clearer on the cause of a rise in liver inflammation, or hepatitis, in children. A common adenovirus is thought to play a role, but other possibilities are still being investigated. In the UK, 163 cases have now been identified, and 11 children have received liver transplants. Cases have been detected in 20 countries worldwide, with nearly 300 children affected, and one death. "It's important that parents know the likelihood of their child developing hepatitis is extremely low," said Dr Meera Chand, from the UK Health Security Agenc
  9. News Article
    A spike in the number of measles cases around the world has sparked concerns over the potential for serious outbreaks this year. Almost 17,338 measles cases were reported worldwide in January and February 2022, compared to 9,665 during the first two months of last year – which represents a rise of 79%. Unicef and the World Health Organisation (WHO) warned that there is a “perfect storm” for serious outbreaks of the vaccine-preventable illnesses such as measles. As of this month, the agencies report 21 large and disruptive measles outbreaks around the world in the last 12 months.
  10. Content Article
    The last week of April celebrates ‘World Immunisation Week’, ran by the World Health Organization (WHO), which aims to promote the use of vaccines globally to protect people of all ages against disease. Immunisation is a cost effective and critical element of preventive care around the world, estimated to prevent two to three million deaths each year.[1] At present, the vaccination we are most familiar with is for COVID-19. Coronavirus vaccination has been very successful here in the UK; however, uptake in other countries, particularly less economically developed countries, has been less so. S
  11. News Article
    The UK’s Health Security Agency (UKHSA) says it is investigating after finding more than 100 cases of sudden hepatitis in children. Doctors said they had seen "increasing" evidence the problem is linked to adenoviruses - a group of viruses that can cause illnesses such as the common cold and flu. The HSA said it cannot rule out other possible causes such as Covid, which it is also investigating, but that an adenovirus has been identified in 40 out of the 53 cases so far tested. In Britain, cases have reached 81 in England, 14 in Scotland, 11 in Wales and five in Northern Ireland
  12. News Article
    Pregnant women should be tested for Group B Strep to save the lives of dozens of babies every year, campaigners have warned. Group B Strep is the most recurrent cause of life-threatening illness in newborn babies, with an average of two babies a day identified with the infection. Each week, one of these babies goes on to die while another develops an ongoing long-term disability. More than one in five women carry Group B Strep, a common bacteria that normally causes no harm and no symptoms. However, its presence in the vagina or rectum means babies can be exposed to it during labour
  13. News Article
    Health officials say they are now investigating unexplained cases of hepatitis in children in four European countries and the US. Cases of hepatitis, or liver inflammation, have been reported in Denmark, Ireland, the Netherlands, Spain and the US, health officials say. Last week UK health authorities said they had detected higher than usual cases of the infection among children. The cause of the infections is not yet known. The European Centre for Disease Control (ECDC) did not specify how many cases have been found in the four European countries in total. But the World Hea
  14. Content Article
    The Patients Association will use a screening process to identify up to 12 patients to participate. The workshops will be convened twice, in May and July, for 2.5 hour virtual meetings. Pfizer will reimburse participants £65 per hour. Pfizer is seeking patients who meet the following criteria: Adult UK residents only Experience with bacterial infections* that have required management in a hospital setting Infections that were not a single episode of infection, but that have been resistant to antibiotics, requiring recurrent and prolonged course of antibiotics If
  15. News Article
    The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) has recently detected higher than usual rates of liver inflammation (hepatitis) in children. Similar cases are being assessed in Scotland. Hepatitis is a condition that affects the liver and may occur for a number of reasons, including several viral infections common in children. However, in the cases under investigation the common viruses that cause hepatitis have not been detected. UKHSA is working swiftly with the NHS and public health colleagues across the UK to investigate the potential cause. In England, there are approximately 60 cases und
  16. News Article
    Hundreds of people identified as contacts following a tuberculosis (TB) outbreak in a Carmarthenshire village are yet to attend a screening, health officials have said. Public Health Wales (PHW) said 31 cases of active TB had been identified since the 2010 outbreak in Llwynhendy. PHW urged the 485 people who have been identified as contacts, but not attended a screening, to act. More than 2,600 people have attended screenings since June 2019. TB is a bacterial infection, spread through inhaling tiny droplets from the coughs or sneezes of an infected person. It is a serious
  17. News Article
    A patient who died from Lassa fever last week was a newborn baby, according to reports. The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) confirmed on Friday that an individual with the Ebola-like disease had died in Bedfordshire, and that two other people were infected. All three cases were linked to recent travel in West Africa. The BBC said the fatality had been an infant at Luton and Dunstable Hospital, quoting an email sent to staff by Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust. Hundreds of frontline workers at the hospital, as well as at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, were r
  18. News Article
    Advice on how new mothers with sepsis should be treated is to change after two women died of a herpes infection. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists says viral sources of infections should be considered and appropriate treatment offered. This comes after the BBC revealed one surgeon might have infected the mothers while performing Caesareans on them. The East Kent Hospitals Trust said it had not been possible to identify the source of either infection. Kimberley Sampson, 29, and Samantha Mulcahy, 32, died of an infection caused by the herpes virus 44 days apart
  19. Content Article
    1 WHO: World Antimicrobial Awareness Week 2021 World Antimicrobial Awareness Week takes place from the 18-24 November every year. The World Health Organization (WHO) explains what antimicrobial resistance is and provides several short explanatory videos about how this can be prevented. 2 My involvement with Commonwealth Partnerships for Antimicrobial Stewardship Scheme (CwPAMS) in Zambia In this blog, Fiona Rees, who worked in the NHS as a hospital pharmacist for 13 years, shares her experience of working with colleagues in Zambia aiming to improve the use of antimicrobials by u
  20. Content Article
    Findings Findings of this investigation included: The existing systems for triage do not always take into account the colour of a patient’s skin. This may influence a healthcare professional’s assessment of an infant’s/child’s physical signs. Staffing standards that relate to the treatment of children in emergency departments cannot always be met due to workforce challenges, particularly in hospitals without a dedicated paediatric emergency department. Sometimes parents describe feeling powerless when trying to articulate their concerns for their child. Some healthcare
  21. News Article
    The NHS has been given the green light to offer people living with HIV the first "long-acting injectable" to keep the virus at bay. Charities have hailed the "incredible news" which offers an alternative to adults living with HIV who have to take daily antiretroviral drugs. Many people living with HIV can keep the virus at very low levels by taking antiretroviral tablets each day. These drugs keep the number of virus particles in the blood - also known as the viral load - so low that it cannot be detected or transmitted between people. But now an estimated 13,000 people will be
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