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Found 183 results
  1. News Article
    Antibiotics could be given to children at schools affected by Strep A to stop the spread of the infection, schools minister Nick Gibb has said. Mr Gibb told Sky News that the UK Health and Security Agency (UKHSA) is "working closely with the schools involved and giving very specific advice to those schools which may involve the use of penicillin". He added that health officials will "have more to say about that". "They're providing more general advice to parents, which is to look out for the symptoms - so, sore throat, fever, high temperature and also a red or raised rash on the
  2. News Article
    ‘Rubbish’ communications on Group A Strep from government agencies made A&Es more ‘risky’ over the weekend, after services were flooded with the ‘worried well’, several senior provider sources have told HSJ. On Friday the UK Health Security Agency, successor to Public Health England, issued a warning on a higher than usual number of cases after the deaths of five children under 10 in a week. Several senior sources in hospital, 111/ambulance, urgent care and primary care providers, told HSJ they were not warned UKHSA were making an announcement that would also see services flooded
  3. News Article
    There have been five recorded deaths within seven days of an invasive Strep A diagnosis in children under 10 in England this season, the UK Health Security Agency has said. A child under the age of 10 has also died in Wales after contracting the infection. Group A strep bacteria can cause many infections, ranging from minor illnesses to deadly diseases, but serious complications and deaths are rare. According to UKHSA data, there were 2.3 cases of invasive disease per 100,000 children aged one to four this year in England, compared with an average of 0.5 in the pre-pandemic seas
  4. News Article
    There is now an "imminent threat" of measles spreading in every region of the world, the World Health Organisation and the US public health agency has said. In a joint report, the health organisations said there had been a fall in vaccines against measles and less surveillance of the disease during the COVID pandemic. Measles is one of the most contagious human viruses but is almost entirely preventable through vaccination, though it requires 95% vaccine coverage to prevent outbreaks. A record high of nearly 40 million children missed a dose last year because of hurdles created
  5. Content Article
    The report recommends the following actions to address the threat of AMR: NHS England, in collaboration with NICE, should urgently commission a national assessment of the clinical and cost-effectiveness of using rapid diagnostic tools. As part of this assessment, differences in the effectiveness of using diagnostics to support prescribing in primary and secondary care should be considered. NHS England should centrally purchase diagnostic tools, to more rapidly increase the percentage of prescriptions that are supported by a diagnostic test, drawing on evidence collected from the
  6. News Article
    A new treatment to protect babies against a common and potentially dangerous winter virus has been approved by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the main reason children under five end up in hospital. In a normal winter, RSV mostly causes coughs and colds which clear up in a couple of weeks - but it can be particularly serious in infants under the age of two, causing severe lung problems such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Every year, about 29,000 babies need hospital care for RSV and most have no other health issues befo
  7. News Article
    The health board in the Scottish Borders has said it is monitoring "unseasonably high" numbers of scarlet fever cases in the region. Parents have been asked to be aware of the symptoms so that early treatment with antibiotics can be given. Scarlet fever is a bacterial illness that mainly affects children under 10 but people of any age can get it. NHS Borders said it would usually clear up after about a week but anyone who thinks they or a child may have it has been asked to contact a GP for a proper diagnosis and appropriate treatment. "Due to the contagious nature of scarl
  8. News Article
    A case of MRSA has been reported at the congested asylum processing centre at Manston in Kent, the Guardian has learned, after it emerged that Suella Braverman ignored advice that people were being kept at the centre unlawfully. The antibiotic-resistant bacteria was identified in an asylum seeker who initially tested positive for diphtheria. But the asylum seeker was moved out of the site in Ramsgate to a hotel hundreds of miles away before the positive test result was received, raising concerns about the spread of the infection. The Manston site is understood to now have at least ei
  9. News Article
    The World Health Organization has published its first ever list of lethal fungal infections that represent a threat to public health. Experts have noticed an increase in deadly fungal disease, with drug-resistant bacterial infections now responsible for roughly 1.27 million deaths every year. “Fungal pathogens are a major threat to public health as they are becoming increasingly common and resistant to treatment,” WHO said. The types of fungal infections listed often affect severely ill patients and those with significant underlying problems with their immune system, including p
  10. News Article
    Health chiefs have warned of a Covid and flu “twindemic” this winter as they launched a renewed vaccination drive. Around 33 million people in England will be eligible for a free flu vaccination this year, while 26 million are also eligible for an autumn Covid-19 booster. Officials at the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) warned there will be lower levels of natural immunity to flu this year after the past few winters saw the public socialising less during restrictions. The UKHSA warned of a possible "difficult winter" ahead as respiratory viruses, including flu and Covid, circu
  11. News Article
    India faces a “pandemic” of superbugs, the country’s top public health experts have warned, as resistance to common antibiotics has jumped by 10% in just one year In the fifth edition of its annual report on antimicrobial resistance (AMR), the Indian Council of Medical Research warned that urgent action is needed to prevent a major health crisis caused by the rampant misuse of antibiotics. “The resistance level is increasing to five to ten per cent every year for broad spectrum antimicrobials, which are highly misused,” said Dr Kamini Walia, who led the ICMR’s report. “Antibioti
  12. News Article
    Trainee medics battling Ebola in Uganda's virus epicentre accuse the government of putting their lives at risk. "Most times you come into contact with a patient and you use your bare hands," one worker told the BBC anonymously. All trainees at Mubende's regional hospital say they are on strike and are demanding to be moved somewhere safer. But Ugandan health ministry spokesman Emmanuel Ainebyoona told the BBC there was "no strike at the hospital". Yet all 34 of the hospital's interns - including doctors, pharmacists and nurses - have announced their decision to strike in a
  13. Content Article
    Key insights 68% of PLHIV in the study were worried about the long-term effects of HIV medicines 65% of PLHIV agreed that they would like to be more involved in decisions about their HIV treatment Those who reported being informed of undetectable =untransmittable (U=U) by their healthcare professionals had more favourable health outcomes than those who reported not being informed
  14. News Article
    A malaria vaccine created by Oxford researchers “is really exciting” and could contribute towards drastically reducing the number of children who die from the infection, experts suggest. A new study reports on the effectiveness of a malaria booster vaccine which shows long-lasting high efficacy in African children, meeting the World Health Organisation (WHO) specified 75% efficacy goal. The research found that a vaccine booster dose one year after children received three doses as their primary vaccination regime maintained high efficacy against malaria. Adrian Hill, director of
  15. Content Article
    Did you know? Key causes of anti-infective medication error claims: Failure to check allergy status. Failure to cross-check the ingredients of a medication against allergy status. Failure to adjust dose of medication to the patient’s weight. Failure to adjust dose of medication according to renal function. What can you do? When prescribing antibiotics, refer to the British National Formulary (BNF) for guidance on adjusting dosages according to patient weight, kidney function and the frequency of monitoring. Refer to the traffc light system for
  16. News Article
    There is an urgent need to develop evidence based clinical guidelines for managing cases of monkeypox, scientists said, after finding that existing guidance frequently lacked detail and was based on poor research. They urged establishing a 'living guideline' for infectious disease to ensure that up-to-date information, based on robust research, was available globally and in any setting. The study, published in BMJ Global Health, also called for investment to back research into optimal treatments and prophylaxis strategies. The study authors wrote: "The lack of clarity between gu
  17. News Article
    The monkeypox outbreak has been declared a global health emergency by the World Health Organization. According to the UK Health Security Agency, early symptoms of monkeypox include fever, headache, muscle aches, swollen lymph nodes and chills, as well as other features such as exhaustion. Monkeypox does not spread easily between humans, and requires close contact. According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it is thought that human-to-human transmission primarily occurs through large respiratory droplets. Globally, there have so far been 16,016 monkeypox case
  18. Content Article
    NHS England and NHS Improvement make the following four recommendations for improving the blood culture pathway: Build upon existing national guidance and best practice. Implement local monitoring to identify areas for improvement. AMR to be a core part of clinical leadership and trust governance. Improve regulation and accreditation.
  19. News Article
    Diminishing rates of measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) jabs have prompted a Royal College warning over the risks to pregnant women, as the NHS raises concerns over London “lagging” behind the national uptake. The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health’s immunisations lead, Dr Helen Bradford, said the falling uptake of the MMR vaccine could present a serious risk to pregnant women and their unborn children. The warning comes as London health authorities are planning a major summer drive to improve uptake in the capital, The Independent has learned. Documents seen by The In
  20. News Article
    The UK needs to do more to use diagnostic testing in the fight against antimicrobial resistance (AMR), the chair of a government-commissioned review on AMR told MPs. Lord O’Neill, an economist and former treasury minister, warned in the review’s final report in 2016 that a continued rise in AMR would lead to 10 million people dying each year by 2050 and made ten recommendations, including the need for rapid diagnostics to reduce unnecessary use of antimicrobials. Speaking to a Commons Science and Technology Committee evidence session on 22 June 2022, Lord O’Neill said that while he w
  21. News Article
    The NHS is urgently tracking down the parents of 35,000 five-year-old children in London who are not fully vaccinated against polio. Health officials are hoping to contain the spread of the virus after detecting the first outbreak since 1984. They are trying to trace it back to a “single household or street” after identifying polio in a sewage plant serving four million people in northeast London. Experts are concerned polio, which had been eradicated in Britain in the 1980s, could take off again due to relatively low vaccination uptake in London. Latest NHS data shows 101,
  22. News Article
    A clinical trial to test pregnant women for Group B Strep (GBS) – the most common cause of life-threatening infection in newborn babies – will fail unless the Government intervenes, experts have warned. Some 80 hospitals are needed for the trial to go ahead but only 32 have committed to it, with a deadline for registering of September. The trial is being funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and will look at whether testing women for Group B Strep reduces the risk of babies dying or suffering harm. Now Dr Jane Plumb, chief executive of Group B Strep Support
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