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Found 329 results
  1. Content Article
    Kit Tarka, my beautiful baby boy, was born healthy but admitted into special care shortly after birth. He died from the herpes virus (HSV-1) at just 13 days old. Herpes was not suspected in Kit until he arrived, extremely unwell, at the neonatal intensive care unit and someone asked if my partner James or I had had a cold sore recently. I had never had one in my life and my James hadn’t for many years. But by then it was too late. Kit never received the antivirals he needed to save his life. A diagnosis of herpes wasn’t confirmed until the day after he died. Seeking answers
  2. News Article
    New study results in more precise language in the federally mandated warning about this possibility. (Article from the USA) Women who choose to use an intrauterine device, or IUD, for birth control should be aware of the very small possibility that the device could puncture their uterus. They should know how to recognize that circumstance if it occurs, according to a new study published in The Lancet. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration mandated the study to evaluate women's risks when an IUD is placed in the year after giving birth and when an IUD is placed during the period that a
  3. News Article
    A sexual assault survivor chooses sterilization so that if she is ever attacked again, she won’t be forced to give birth to a rapist’s baby. An obstetrician delays inducing a miscarriage until a woman with severe pregnancy complications seems “sick enough.” A lupus patient must stop taking medication that controls her illness because it can also cause miscarriages. Abortion restrictions in a number of states and the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade are having profound repercussions in reproductive medicine as well as in other areas of medical care. “For physicians and
  4. News Article
    Emma Hardy MP has secured a Westminster debate on gynaecological wait times. Gynaecology waiting lists across the UK have now reached a combined figure of more than 610,000 – a 69% increase on pre-pandemic levels. New analysis by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) shows that in England, gynaecology waiting lists have grown the most by percentage increase of all elective specialties. Emma is co-chair of the All Party Parliamentary Groups (APPGs) for Surgical Mesh and Endometriosis - both come under the heading of ‘gynaecological conditions’ and both are being
  5. Content Article
    My health has always been a ‘challenge’ as they say. I had a stoma in 1988, when I was 28 years old, for bowel disease. They were never sure if it was Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, but I was more than happy to kiss my rotten colon goodbye. It restored my bowel health and I carried on working and living my life with my husband and child. Two years after the ileostomy, I had further abdominal problems and a MRI suggested ovarian cancer. I had an emergency laparotomy which revealed severe endometriosis which had obliterated my whole pelvis and infiltrated my internal organs. The gyn
  6. Content Article
    Puberty, birth control and cramps I grew up in Trinidad, in the Caribbean in a very Christian household, and attended religious primary and secondary schools. Sexual and reproductive health was discussed in a functional way in biology class. While we were taught about birth control methods (condoms, IUDs, etc), we were expected to follow the abstinence only path. The shame and stigma around premarital sex meant that a lot of incorrect information was passed from girl to girl. I was one of the lucky ones – my parents provided books, encyclopaedias and, no idea why or how we had them, m
  7. News Article
    England's first women's health ambassador is calling for "one-stop shops" where women can sort out their health needs. Dame Lesley Regan, also a practising doctor, wants to make it easier for women and girls to access care such as contraception and smear tests in the community. Her new role aims to close the "gender health gap". She will also support the upcoming government-led women's-health strategy. "At the moment, we waste a lot of resource in telling girls and women that they cannot have things," she told BBC News. "So you might go off to your doctor or gynaecologist o
  8. Content Article
    In 2015, Kath Sansom was the “ridiculously superfit mother of two adult daughters”. She had started to have a few “embarrassing leaks” while exercising, so Sansom did what many women do in her situation: she went to her GP, who referred her for transvaginal tape surgery, in which a small piece of mesh is fitted around the urethra to prevent incontinence. “I assumed it was a bit like a coil,” says Sansom, 54, a PR manager from Cambridgeshire, “and if I didn’t get on with it, I could have it taken out. I had no idea it was permanent.” When Sansom awoke from her surgery, she was in pain
  9. News Article
    When a couple decides to try to have a child by in vitro fertilisation, it’s often accompanied by anticipation, anxiety and worry about whether the egg and sperm will unite and produce a healthy baby. So when the procedure to retrieve eggs from a woman’s ovary turns out to be physically painful, it can create long-term emotional pain as well, according to a lawsuit and two women who underwent the procedure at the Yale University Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Clinic. They are among dozens of women and spouses who are suing Yale University, claiming the staff at the clinic
  10. News Article
    Regulators have raised serious concerns over trainee doctors within the maternity department at one of the largest trusts in the country. The NHS’ training regulator said it had concerns over the treatment of trainee doctors within the obstetric and gynaecology department at University Hospitals Birmingham Foundation Trust, while some medics report being in ‘meltdown’. Reviewers raised an incident where a consultant had refused to respond to an obstetric emergency in A&E which had been requested by a junior doctor. “The panel unanimously agreed that Consultant presence was r
  11. News Article
    Women undergoing NHS operations are not being routinely informed that a drug commonly used in anaesthesia may make their contraception less effective, putting them at risk of an unplanned pregnancy, doctors have warned. Administered at the end of surgery before patients wake up, sugammadex reverses the action of drugs that are given earlier in the procedure to relax the patient’s muscles. The drug is known to interact with the hormone progesterone and may reduce the effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives, including the progesterone-only pill, combined pill, vaginal rings, implants and i
  12. News Article
    "It's isolating, debilitating and you feel dirty." Too many women have to cope with bowel incontinence from injuries during childbirth, according to one charity. Anna Clements, from Masic, said stigma and a lack of information meant women were unaware of the medical support available. The Welsh government said a plan would be published in the summer on how health boards should provide "high-quality women's health services". A coalition of charities said this was one of a number of ways women experience poor health outcomes. Women need to be listened to and not just dis
  13. News Article
    A woman who has been waiting three years for a hysterectomy says she feels she and other women have been pushed to the bottom of the list. Jessica Ricketts, from Barry, is one of 164,000 patients who have been on various NHS waiting lists for more than a year, compared to less than 7,000 two-years-ago. But it will take another three years to tackle the backlog. Welsh government's plan to tackle long waits is due to be published later. But for Jessica, she remains in pain with endometriosis despite six gynaecological surgeries over the past 10 years and is now waiting for the hys
  14. News Article
    In an ongoing effort to improve care and support for elderly women and women’s health satisfaction and outcomes in general, the government have published their report summarising written responses from 436 organisations and experts from the Women’s Health Strategy call for evidence. The organisations that contributed to the report included participants from the charity sector, academia, professional bodies, clinicians, royal colleges and other general experts in women’s health. The topics highlighted in the report include: Menstrual health and gynaecological conditions, inclu
  15. Content Article
    Priority topics The top 5 topics respondents want DHSC to prioritise for inclusion are: gynaecological conditions (63%) fertility, pregnancy, pregnancy loss and postnatal support (55%) the menopause (48%) menstrual health (47%) mental health (39%). This selection varies most notably by age, with topics rising in importance as they correspond with each stage of a woman’s life course. Other popular topics include research into health issues or medical conditions that affect women (34%), gynaecological cancers (30%), and the health impacts of violenc
  16. Content Article
    The report highlights the following key findings: The maternity service was offering care to women whose pregnancies represented a high risk, but did not have the necessary systems or staff with the appropriate skills in place to manage such cases. There was a lack of input from consultants at crucial times, and there was an over reliance on junior staff to manage complex and difficult cases with little guidance or support. Consultant obstetricians did not routinely carry out ward rounds when they were responsible for overseeing care in the labour ward and the teamwork betw
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