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Found 14 results
  1. Content Article
    From the 5365 operations, 188 adverse events were recorded. Of these, 106 adverse events (56.4%) were due to human error, of which cognitive error accounted for 99 of 192 human performance deficiencies (51.6%). These data provide a framework and impetus for new quality improvement initiatives incorporating cognitive training to mitigate human error in surgery.
  2. Content Article
    The aim of this study, published in Human Factors journal, was to examine the effects of interruptions and retention interval on prospective memory for deferred tasks in simulated air traffic control. This can be translated into a healthcare environment.
  3. Content Article
    What can I learn? Managing human failures Staffing Fatigue and shiftwork Safety critical communications Human factors in design Procedures Competence Organisational change Organisational culture Maintenance, inspection and testing
  4. Content Article
    The book blends literature on the nature of practice with diverse and eclectic reflections from experience in a range of contexts, from healthcare to agriculture. It explores what helps and what hinders the achievement of the core goals of human factors and ergonomics (HF/E): improved system performance and human wellbeing. The book should be of interest to current HF/E practitioners, future HF/E practitioners, allied practitioners, HF/E advocates and ambassadors, researchers, policy makers and regulators, and clients of HF/E services and products.
  5. Content Article
    In this article, Dan looks back at the Donabedian Model, a framework for measuring healthcare quality, and suggests why this might be an over simplification and why we must also look at human factors when we think about patient safety. We are humans and we can, do and will make mistakes, so we have a personal responsibility to acknowledge and address this as a contributing factor for patient safety incidents and harm. How do we begin to address our individual responsibilities? How can each of us reduce the personal risks we pose for our patients? How do we begin to address the moral imperative to recognise and then overcome any professional complacency that may interfere with our performance? Dan believes by enhancing human performance within healthcare settings this will serve as the ultimate key to improving quality and safety. Recognition by clinicians of their own tendencies toward complacency and their own vulnerabilities toward making mistakes is to encompass a mandate for personal professional commitment and improvement. If patients are harmed on the frontlines in healthcare settings, then it is on the frontlines that many of the solutions can be found and safety improvements nurtured. First recognising, and then modulating, the human factors liabilities that exist on the frontlines and overcoming the challenges of professional complacency will be necessary steppingstones towards sustained improvements in providing patient safe care. Clinicians, managers and leaders need to work collaboratively to understand and overcome the challenges that human factors pose when addressing individual performance.
  6. Content Article
    In this blog, Steven questions: Are we reducing the human to ‘human error’? Are we reducing the human to a faulty information processing machine? Are we reducing the human to emotional aberrations? Are we reducing human involvement in socio-technical systems?
  7. Content Article
    The widespread implementation of CPOE thoughout the US has benefited clinicians and patients, but it also vividly illustrates the risks and unintended consequences of digitising a fundamental healthcare process, this paper published in PSNet explains how and why.
  8. Content Article
    Key highlights from the paper Accountability relationships, as both retrospective and prospective, support just culture. Lines are fluid in accountability relationships, forcing operators to adapt to changing goals. Viewing accountability lines as rigid, increases risk and creates double-binds for operators. Clinging to retrospective accountability reinforces blaming/shaming operators for errors.
  9. Content Article
    Key themes: Situational awareness Handover resources Interruptions and distractions Delegation Task-fixation, helicopter view & closed-loop communication Ask for help.
  10. Content Article
    Key learning points Two approaches to the problem of human fallibility exist: the person and the system approaches. The person approach focuses on the errors of individuals, blaming them for forgetfulness, inattention, or moral weakness. The system approach concentrates on the conditions under which individuals work and tries to build defences to avert errors or mitigate their effects. High reliability organisations—which have less than their fair share of accidents—recognise that human variability is a force to harness in averting errors, but they work hard to focus that variability and are constantly preoccupied with the possibility of failure.
  11. Content Article
    I started my career in a care of the elderly ward (geriatrics), which was exciting as my first job, and I felt that my time management needed to be worked on prior to me starting my career in what I knew at the time to be emergency nursing. I stayed in this area for a year, taking charge of the shift and also managing a bay of eight patients, which was the norm (or so I thought). After about 1 year, I thought about moving on, continuing to learn, and I started working in an intensive care unit (ICU). During my time in ICU, I made a drug error involving a controlled drug. Without going into too much detail, there was a lot of factors involved in this case and I was told I was going down the disciplinary route. This was a real low point for me and I felt like I really needed support, not only to come to terms with the error itself, but also support from a reflective side – what I can do, so this doesn’t happen again. I was a new band 5 nurse in the department with no previous ITU experience, with a new Band 6 and Band 7 leading the team which we were working with solidly. They chose not to suspend me, but keep me working without being able to complete medications. I continued to work as per rota, never taking a day off sick, etc. This continued for about 3 months unable to complete my job role to its full potential, and continuing the days and nights and the weekend shifts, along with personal issues of my own to contend with also. I thought at the time it was normal to feel like this post an error, but in hindsight, the support I received was not adequate. In fact, I would go as far as to say I didn’t get any support, other than the normal "are you okay" at the start of each shift. By the time the disciplinary happened, I was 'rock bottom', which is banded around a lot, but I didn’t see a way out, without my family and partner saying that I needed to get out, I don’t know what I would have done. Nevertheless, I left for new horizons, and changed my speciality. I went to A&E where I knew I wanted to be, with a great team, with great management and culture. However, one day I let them down. I completed a second drug error. This was involving an insulin/dextrose infusion for hyperkalaemia, which I mixed up for hyperglycaemia. This error rattled me again. I felt like I was going down that 'rabbit hole' yet again, becoming more and more anxious and needing extra support, more than ever. Fortunately, the patient was okay and was identified quickly. The error was serious and after talking to my manager, they suspended me from clinical duties whilst the investigation was occurring. This was absolutely devastating to me. I felt like I was just settled in my job, feeling more positive about my career that I love so much. Whilst the investigation was going on, I continued my non-clinical work, completing various tasks that would normally take an age to complete. This is where I fell in love with the non-clinical side of the department and continue to work in this area today. However, in contrast to the first incident, I was asked whether I was okay, but also followed up with regular 1:1 welfare meetings, and felt like my manager was actively supporting me. I also started a piece of work on preventing this incident happening again. I have now gone up the ladder in the same organisation, and continue to feel settled. However, this really put the importance of supporting people as one of the main priorities in my daily practice. It also put into context the real need for establishing and integrating a no blame culture and getting rid of the culture of fear. It is very easy to forget the mental health aspect. Patient safety is aimed at patients (quite rightly so), but I think somewhere in the mix, we forget about that individual who takes this home day in, day out. I understand that there is accountability and there is taking responsibility for your actions as per the Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC) Code of Conduct. But I think we forget about humanity and the need for support and coming together when one of your team is 'down'. I can honestly say, without my team and my managers, I wouldn’t be the nurse I am today, and I am forever grateful. And those people who have done errors or know what this is like, maybe you’re going through this today; there is light at the end of the tunnel. I share my story with the upmost respect and apologies to the patients involved and also to my team!
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