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Found 11 results
  1. News Article
    All NHS hospitals in England have been told to destroy a powerful medicine mistakenly used by staff because its packaging looks the same as another drug. A national safety alert was issued following several incidents, including two deaths of babies, in which patients were inadvertently given a dose of sodium nitrite – which is used as an antidote to cyanide poisoning – rather than sodium bicarbonate. The errors are thought to have been caused by similarities between the labelling and drug packaging used by manufacturers. Now hospitals have been told to check all wards and medicine storage areas for sodium nitrite and to destroy any of the unlicensed product. The drug should only be available in emergency departments and may have been supplied to medical wards by mistake. There are an estimated 237 million medication errors in the NHS every year – with a third linked to packaging and labelling. Read full story Source: The Independent, 9 August 2020
  2. Content Article
    The attached report summarises the event. Morning presentations included a keynote address from Professor Coleman, University of Birmingham, and a moving and inspiring presentation from Lisa Richards-Everton, a Patient Safety Campaigner. Delegates then participated in a taster workshop looking at challenges around labelling and used the SIEPS 2.0 model to conduct a systems analysis of the management of a patient’s condition. The afternoon branched into parallel syndicate workshops with the first workshop focusing on training and education around labelling; what challenges needed addressing with training, and how a human factors approach could optimally start to address these training issues. The second workshop looked to identify and discuss challenges around the medicine label and how these could be addressed using a human factors approach. This included looking at some of the issues that exist with current labelling design, before discussing what information is necessary and then providing recommendations for the design from a human factor’s perspective. All syndicate groups gave recommendations for next steps to address these challenges, which were shared at the conclusion of the meeting. Several delegates then volunteered to be involved in a steering team, whose remit would be to address the identified challenges by exploring ways in which these systembased recommendations might be implemented. Recommendations around training perspectives included areas such as education and communication; system redesign, use of technology and recommendations about the design of medical packaging with a human factors approach.
  3. Content Article
    Overview Labelling for medicines Safety features legislation Patient information leaflets (PILs) Warnings on labels and leaflets for medicines Braille on labelling and in PILs Child resistant packaging for medicines Submit information for full assessment Notification scheme registration Fees Make a submission or notification Complaints about labels, leaflets or packaging UK and European regulation
  4. Content Article
    This issue (episode 3) focuses on: safe administration of concentrated insulin products errors with confusing product labelling educating patients about safe medication practices.
  5. Content Article
    This blog discusses the barriers in tackling some of healthcares biggest patient safety problems - medication labelling and drug errors to name just one. It highlights the need to listen to experts outside of healthcare as localised solutions do not solve the wider, more complex issues of patient safety.
  6. News Article
    Every pharmacist must report adverse drug reactions using the yellow card scheme, says chair of the Community Pharmacy Patient Safety Group, Janice Perkins Polypharmacy, when different medications are used by an individual at the same time, is becoming increasingly common because people are living for longer and with multiple different illnesses. One study, published in 2018 by the Oxford University Press, found that over half (54%) of those aged 65 years and above who took part in the study had two or more long-term conditions, for which they could have been taking a range of medicines. Read full story Source: Community Pharmacy News, 17 February 2020
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