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Found 129 results
  1. Event
    until
    The advancing mental health equalities strategy published in September 2020 outlines the core enabling actions NHS England and NHS Improvement will take with the support of the Advancing Mental Health Equalities Taskforce – an alliance of sector experts, including patients and carers, who are committed to creating more equitable access, experience and outcomes in mental health services in England. It sits alongside the NHS Mental Health Implementation Plan 2019/20–2023/24 and as such is similarly focused in scope. This strategy is also an important element of the overall NHS plans to accelerate action to address health inequalities in the next stage of responding to COVID-19. This webinar lead by Dr Jacqui Dyer MBE will introduce advancing mental health equalities strategy and summarise the core actions that NHS England and NHS Improvement will take to bridge the gaps for communities fairing worse than others in mental health services. Register
  2. Event
    This Westminster Health Forum conference will discuss the priorities for improving the health outcomes in babies and young children and the next steps for policy. It is taking place as The Rt Hon Andrea Leadsom MP, Government's Early Years Health Adviser - who is a keynote speaker at this conference - leads a review into improving health outcomes in babies and young children as part of the Government’s levelling up policy agenda. With the first phase of the review expected in early 2021, this conference will be an opportunity for stakeholders to discuss the priorities and latest thinking on improving health outcomes. The discussion is bringing together stakeholders with key policy officials who are due to attend from DHSC and the DfE. The agenda: The priorities for improving health outcomes for babies and young children. Understanding the importance of the first 1,000 days in child development' Improving child public health, reducing inequalities and the impact of social adversity in childhood. Identifying measures for supporting vulnerable and disadvantaged young children and families - and learning from the COVID-19 pandemic. Priorities for system-wide collaboration to address underlying health inequalities and key opportunities for improving health outcomes in young children going forward. Next steps for the commissioning of health services for children in the early stages of life. Improving health outcomes for young children across health and care - integrating services, care pathways, workforce training, and partnership working. Register
  3. News Article
    Older women could be less likely to receive ovarian cancer treatment. A new report analysed data from more than 17,000 cases of ovarian cancer diagnosed across England between 2016 and 2018. Three in five (60%) of women with ovarian cancer over the age of 79 did not receive either chemotherapy or surgery, while 37% of women over the age of 70 did not receive any treatment. The nature of ovarian cancer means surgery is essential in the large majority of cases to remove the tumour. The researchers cautioned that with an ageing population it is vital that women of all ages have access to the best possible treatments. Researchers also examined the various rates of treatments for ovarian cancer among women in different parts of England. They found the probability of receiving any treatment fell below the average in the East Midlands, the East of England, Greater Manchester and Kent and Medway. The report was jointly funded by The British Gynaecological Cancer Society, Ovarian Cancer Action, Target Ovarian Cancer and delivered by analysts at the National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service. Commenting on the report, Cary Wakefield, chief executive of Ovarian Cancer Action, said: "Neither your age nor location should decide your chance of survival if you are diagnosed with ovarian cancer." "Our audit is the first step in addressing the health inequalities women across England face, so we can begin to dismantle them." Read full story Source: The Independent, 11 November 2020
  4. Content Article
    Key findings The more deprived the area that a person lives in, the less likely they are to report a positive experience of accessing general practice and a good overall experience of general practice. Older patients tend to report better access to general practice – they are more satisfied with their experiences making appointments and find it easier to get through to their practice by phone. However, they are less likely to have used online services. Asian patients report poorer experiences making appointments and more difficulty getting through to their GP practice by phone. Black patients are the least likely to have used any online services. Differences in experience of and access to general practice observed between demographic groups have been consistent over the past 3 years of survey data (changes in survey method mean that we can’t look any further back).
  5. Content Article
    With a concerted effort that encompasses multiple sectors, Egede and Walker suggest we can change the fabric of structural racism and social risk that leads to disparities in health. In this New England Journal of Medicine article, they propose that to be effective, change must occur within federal, state, county, and city governments; within private and nonprofit businesses and in the health care, food, housing, education, and justice arenas; and at the individual level. If everyone took a stand to stop racism and found a way to participate in sustainable change in one of the six suggested areas below, the result could be transformational. Recommended action items for mitigating structural racism: Change policies that keep structural racism in place. Break down silos and create cross-sector partnerships. Institute policies to increase economic empowerment. Fund community programs that enhance neighborhood stability. Be consistent in efforts by health systems to build trust in vulnerable communities. Test and deploy targeted interventions that address social risk factors.
  6. Event
    Westminster Health Forum policy conference. The agenda: Assessing the impact of COVID-19 on the ethnic minority community, and priorities for improving health outcomes. The health and social care response to inequality through the pandemic and taking forward new initiatives. Understanding the data and risk factors for COVID-19 in ethnic minority groups. Wider health inequalities faced by people in ethnic minorities - addressing underlying factors, and the role of COVID-19 recovery strategies in supporting long-term change. Priorities for providing leadership in tackling health inequalities in the workforce. Driving forward and ensuring race equality in the NHS. Providing support to the ethnic minority health workforce and taking forward key learnings from COVID-19. Next steps for action in race disparity in healthcare. Book
  7. Event
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    It is impossible in the year 2020 to ignore the glaring inequalities in our healthcare system. The disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Black, Asian and minority ethnic communities, coupled with local Black Lives Matter activity following the killing of George Floyd, underscore the threat systemic racism poses to lives in the UK as well as the US. Though these events have prompted much discussion in the medical community, this injustice is not new: data has long demonstrated a link between ethnicity and health outcomes. What can we, as doctors and medical managers, do to close this health gap and ensure all patients can expect the same quality of care, treatment and outcomes in the future? Seeking to answer this question, the BMA committee for medical managers (CMM) are hosting a free, online panel discussion to explore how increasing diversity in medical leadership can lead to better outcomes for all. Register
  8. Content Article
    The report calls for urgent action and includes several recommendations: Recommendation 1: The Government must go further and set out an urgent plan for tackling the disproportionate impact of Covid on ethnic minorities this winter Recommendation 2: A national strategy to tackle health inequalities Recommendation 3: Suspend ‘no recourse to public funds’ rule during the pandemic and initiate a review Recommendation 4: Ensure Covid-19 cases from the workplace are properly recorded Recommendation 5: Strengthen Covid-19 risk assessments to ensure consistency and to give workers more confidence Recommendation 6: Improve access to PPE in all high-risk workplaces Recommendation 7: Give targeted support to people who are struggling to self-isolate at home Recommendation 8: Ensure protection and an end to discrimination for renters Recommendation 9: Raise the local housing allowance and address the root causes of homelessness Recommendation 10: Urgently conduct equality impact assessments on the Government’s support schemes to make sure Black, Asian and minority ethnic people are able to access the support they need Recommendation 11: Develop and implement a clear plan to prevent the stigmatisation of communities during Covid-19 Recommendation 12: Urgently legislate to tackle online harms Recommendation 13: Ensure everyone can access Covid-19 communication Recommendation 14: Collect and publish better ethnicity data Recommendation 15: Implement a race equality strategy Recommendation 16: Ensure all policies and programmes help tackle structural inequality Recommendation 17: Introduce mandatory ethnicity pay gap reporting Recommendation 18: End the ‘hostile environment’ Recommendation 19: Reform the curriculum to fight the root causes of racism Recommendation 20: Take action to close the attainment gap. Follow the link below to read the full report and more detailed version of the recommendations.
  9. News Article
    Poorer mothers are three times more likely to have stillborn children than those from more affluent backgrounds, according to a new study. The wide-ranging research, conducted by pregnancy charity Tommy’s, also found that high levels of stress doubled the likelihood of stillbirth, irrespective of other social factors and pregnancy complications. Unemployed mothers were almost three times more at risk. The government has been urged to take immediate action to address the social determinants of health and halt the rise in pregnant women who face the stress of financial insecurity. Researchers said getting more antenatal care can stop women from having a stillbirth — with mothers who went to more appointments than national rules stipulate having a 72% lower risk. Ros Bragg, director of Maternity Action said, “If the government is serious about combatting stillbirths, it must address the social determinants of health as well as clinical care. Women need safe, secure employment during their pregnancy and the certainty of a decent income if they find themselves out of work. It is not right that increasing numbers of pregnant women are dealing with the stress of financial insecurity, putting them at increased risk of serious health problems, including stillbirth.” Read full story Source: The Independent, 29 October 2020
  10. News Article
    Concerns are growing that long NHS waiting times caused by the coronavirus crisis are exacerbating pre-existing health inequalities and creating a “two-tier” system, as more people turn to the private sector for quicker treatment. As leading doctors warn mass cancellations of NHS operations in England are inevitable this winter after waiting times reached the highest levels on record this summer, data shows a rise in the number of people self-funding treatment or investing in private health insurance. “COVID-19 has not impacted everyone equally, and there is clearly a risk that the backlog in routine hospital treatment is going to add to those inequalities if some people are able to get treatment faster because they’re able to pay,” said Tim Gardner, from the Health Foundation thinktank. As the NHS heads into winter and a growing second wave of the virus, experts stressed the need to help those affected by the backlog now. “There is a need to prioritise the most urgent cases, but simply because someone’s case isn’t urgent doesn’t mean it’s not important. It doesn’t mean that people aren’t waiting in pain and discomfort, or waiting anxiously for a diagnosis,” said Gardner. “We think it’s incumbent on the health service to make the best possible use of the capacity it’s got. But also it needs to make sure it’s supporting people while they’re waiting. We just can’t have people left in limbo.” Read full story Source: The Guardian, 27 October 2020
  11. News Article
    Doctors from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds have been hindered in their search for senior roles because of widespread “racial discrimination” in the NHS, according to a report from the Royal College of Physicians. The RCP, which represents 30,000 of the UK’s hospital doctors, found that ingrained “bias” in the NHS made it much harder for BAME doctors to become a consultant compared with their white counterparts. “It is clear from the results of this survey that racial discrimination is still a major issue within the NHS,” said Dr Andrew Goddard, the RCP’s president. “It’s a travesty that any healthcare appointment would be based on anything other than ability.” Read full story Source: The Guardian, 21 October 2020
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