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Found 12 results
  1. News Article
    Health and social care secretary Matt Hancock delivered a ‘future of healthcare’ speech to the Royal College of Physicians on Thursday and laid out seven lessons from the health and care response to Covid-19 that he wants to see retained. If followed through, some of his points would mark significant shifts in policy and Conservative thinking. However, Hancock said it was important to “build better” in the way that London was built better after the Great Fire in 1666. Hancock’s seven points were: the NHS must value people and ‘bust bureaucracy’ that gets in their way; the future is “collaboration not competition”; “better technology means better healthcare”; the NHS must be open to other sectors; planning and funding will be “system first”; and social care and public health need more attention. On tech, Hancock said consultations will be digital first, and there will be a new focus on interoperability and data sharing.
  2. News Article
    NHS Digital and the Private Healthcare Information Network (PHIN) have launched a consultation as part of the next phase of a programme to align private healthcare data with NHS recorded activity. The consultation sets out a series of changes to how data is recorded and managed across private and NHS care, along with a series of pilot projects, based upon feedback from a variety of stakeholders. It aims to seek the views of private and NHS providers, clinicians, the public and other organisations with an interest in private healthcare and will be used to help shape the future changes. The consultation, which has been launched following the publication of the Paterson Inquiry, will be hosted on the NHS Digital Consultation Hub. Under the changes proposed in the Acute Data Alignment Programme (ADAPt), PHIN will share the national dataset of private admitted patient care in England with NHS Digital, creating a single source of healthcare data in England. This recommendation has been supported by recommendations in the Paterson Inquiry to create a single repository for practice of consultants in private and public healthcare across England. Health Secretary Matt Hancock said: “Regardless of where you’re treated or how your care is funded, everybody deserves safe, compassionate care. The recent Paterson Inquiry highlighted the shocking failures that can occur when information is not shared and acted upon in both the NHS and independent sector. We are working tirelessly across the health system to deliver the highest standards of care for patients. Trusted data is absolutely critical to this mission and the ADAPt programme will help improve transparency and raise standards for all.” Read full story Source: NHS Digital, 19 February 2020
  3. Content Article
    The draft standard outlined 10 components on what the NHS expects. It’s based on existing standards and will support a process for reviewing, assessing and evaluating digital health technologies that meet the standard. It is also intended to speed up and streamline how health technologies are reviewed and commissioned by the NHS and social care. Patient Safety Learning's response to the draft: “The standard mentions safety up front as a fundamental principle which is good, but there are areas that still need addressing. For example, the need for user testing is implied, but not explicit; where a DHT provides any sort of personalised advice or output, it must gather sufficient context about the user to do this safely and the use of appropriately expert clinicians in the development of the DHT (including those who have worked on ML algorithms) should be tightened up. There are also issues around data that ought to be addressed. Such as the user being able to see (if they have consented appropriately) who their data has been shared with and when; users should be able to change their mind about this when they want to and easily stop their data being shared; and should the DHT vendor no longer support the DHT, they should offer to give the user their data back and wipe it from their servers, or just say it will be deleted.”
  4. Content Article
    Find out in this short video how to use the Model Hospital tool, which was designed to support NHS trusts to identify productivity opportunities and provide the best patient care in the most efficient way. The Model Hospital is broken down into six sections offering different perspectives from which to review hospital activity: board-level oversight clinical service lines corporate services people care settings clinical support services.
  5. Content Article
    The GDE blueprints are a structured collection of knowledge assets and associated methodology for using them. They highlight important ingredients needed for sustainable health improvements such as organisational leadership and culture, technical guidance, clinical and staff engagement as well as the people and processes required to deliver the benefits of technology. They cover a range of digital initiatives such as using software to detect the risk of patients contracting sepsis, having a paperless A&E department or introducing e-prescribing across an organisation to improve safety and quality of care, clinical outcomes, and patient and staff experience. Created by NHS Trusts, who are recognised for using digital technologies to support wider transformation, the GDE blueprints are step-by-step guides that can also be tailored by individual Trusts to suit their own local needs and requirements. The GDE blueprints can be found on the FutureNHS platform. To register, email: gdeblueprints@nhsx.nhs.uk
  6. News Article
    In a keynote speech at the Healthtech Alliance on Tuesday, Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Matt Hancock, stressed how important adopting technology in healthcare is and why he believes that it is vital for the NHS to move into the digital era. “Today I want to set out the future for technology in the NHS and why the techno-pessimists are wrong. Because for any organisation to be the best it possibly can be, rejecting the best possible technology is a mistake.” Listing examples from endless paperwork to old systems resulting in wasted blood samples, Hancock highlights why in order to retain staff and see a thriving healthcare, embracing technology must be a priority. He also announced a £140m Artificial Intelligence (AI) competition to speed up testing and delivery of potential NHS tools. The competition will cover all stages of the product cycle, to proof of concept to real-world testing to initial adoption in the NHS. Examples of AI use currently being trialled were set out in the speech, including using AI to read mammograms, predict and prevent the risk of missed appointments and AI-assisted pathways for same-day chest X-ray triage. Tackling the issue of scalability, Hancock said, “Too many good ideas in the NHS never make it past the pilot stage. We need a culture that rewards and incentivises adoption as well as invention.” Read full speech
  7. News Article
    In his latest blog post, Matthew Gould, CEO of NHSX, has reiterated the potential AI has to reduce the burden on the NHS by improving patient outcomes and increasing productivity. However, he said there are gaps in the rules that govern the use of AI and a lack of clarity on both standards and roles. These gaps mean there is a risk of using AI that is unsafe and that NHS organisations will delay employing AI until all the regulatory gaps have been filled. Gould says, “The benefits will be huge if we can find the sweet spot” that allows trust to be maintained whilst creating the freedom for innovation but warns that we are not in that position yet. At the end of January, the CEOs and heads of 12 regulators and associated organisations met to work through these issues and discuss what was required to ensure innovation-friendly processes and regulations are put in place. They agreed there needs to be a clarity of role for these organisations, including the MHRA being responsible for regulating the safety of AI systems; the Health Research Agency (HRA) for overseeing the research to generate evidence; NICE for assessing whether new AI solutions should be deployed; and the CQC to ensure providers are following best practice. Read the full blog Source: Techradar, 13 February 2020
  8. News Article
    IT systems in the NHS are so outdated that staff have to log in to up to 15 different systems to do their jobs. Doctors can find themselves using different logins for everything from ordering x-rays and getting lab results to accessing A&E records and rotas. The government in England said it was looking to streamline the systems as part of an IT upgrade. Around £40 million is being set aside to help hospitals and clinics introduce single-system logins in the next year. Alder Hey in Liverpool is one of a number of hospitals which have already done this, and found it reduced time spent logging in from one minute 45 seconds to just 10 seconds. With almost 5,000 logins per day, it saved over 130 hours of staff time a day, to focus on patient care. Health Secretary Matt Hancock said it was time to "get the basics right". "It is frankly ridiculous how much time our doctors and nurses waste logging on to multiple systems. Too often outdated technology slows down and frustrates staff." British Medical Association leader Dr Chaand Nagpaul said logging on to multiple systems did waste time. But he said on its own this move would not solve all the problems, pointing out that many of the IT systems themselves were "antiquated" and needed upgrading. Read full story Source: BBC News, 4 January 2020
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