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Found 37 results
  1. News Article
    Shortages of oxygen are endangering the lives of more than half a million COVID-19 patients every day in the world’s poorest nations, new research has shown. Despite being vital for the effective treatment of people admitted to hospital with coronavirus, sustained access to oxygen has proven difficult in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) due to cost, infrastructure and logistical barriers. According to Unitaid, a global health agency, more than half a million people in LMICs currently need 1.1 million cylinders of oxygen per day, with 25 countries currently reporting surges in
  2. News Article
    Some disabled people in the UK have been struggling to obtain essentials such as medication and breathing equipment during the Covid pandemic, research for the BBC suggests. Some 60% of those who rely on social care told a YouGov survey they were finding it hard to obtain at least one of their necessities. Charity WellChild said people felt more "forgotten than they ever have been". But ministers say the needs of disabled people were being considered. The Department of Health and Social Care says it has sufficient stocks and patients should contact their local care provider.
  3. News Article
    The most comprehensive picture so far of how covid’s second wave has hit the NHS in the north of England is revealed in new figures obtained by HSJ. The latest data confirms that parts of the North West region now have more coronavirus patients in hospital beds than they did in the spring. It comes amid intense public debate about the best way to fight covid, and whether or not it is close to swamping the NHS. Collected from local NHS sources in a joint HSJ and Independent investigation, the information shows for example that: Lancashire and South Cumbria had 544 confirmed covi
  4. Content Article
    Some key findings from the audit: Inpatient mortality was 26%. It has reduced from 34% in 2013 and represents the first time that mortality has improved since the first BTS audit in 2010. Compared to the last audit, an increased proportion of patients treated with acute non-invasive ventilation (NIV) had COPD, the indication with the strongest evidence. We saw a decreased proportion of patients who were treated with NIV despite no clearly documented indication. This suggests improved patient selection in line with the evidence base for NIV. 50% of patients treated with NIV st
  5. News Article
    Covid survivor Tam McCue is one of the lucky ones. Earlier in the year he was in intensive care in the Royal Alexandra Hospital in Paisley where he had been on a ventilator for nearly two weeks. At one point Mr McCue, who could barely speak, didn't think he would live. Fast forward five months and Mr McCue, of Barrhead, East Renfrewshire, is back from the brink. He became desperately ill but, thankfully, it only went as far as his lungs. With coronavirus some patients have have suffered multiple organ failure which also affected their heart, kidneys, brain and gut. Mr McCu
  6. News Article
    Hospitals have been warned hundreds of ventilators used to keep sedated patients alive are at risk of suddenly shutting down because of a fault, in some cases without warning. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, which said there were approximately 303 Philips Respironics V60 ventilators used in the UK, has warned hospitals over a delay in replacement parts arriving in the UK to fix the problem. It has issued a safety alert to hospitals to make them aware of the increased risk. The regulator said it had received one report of a ventilator suddenly shutting do
  7. Content Article
    Actions required Primary actions to be completed by 7 October 2020: Identify and locate affected devices in your organisation. Identify alternative ventilators available on site. If no suitable alternative available, and capacity is an issue currently or expected imminently, follow protocol for resource shortage escalation set out by your local governance. Train all relevant staff on alternative ventilators and ensure training records are up to date. When actions 1–4 are complete, remove affected V60s from use and quarantine until repaired by the manufacturer.
  8. News Article
    The lungs and hearts of patients damaged by the coronavirus improve over time, a study has shown. Researchers in Austria recruited coronavirus patients who had been admitted to hospital. The patients were scheduled to return for evaluation 6, 12 and 24 weeks after being discharged, in what is said to be the first prospective follow-up of people infected with COVID-19, which will be presented at today's European Respiratory Society International Congress. Clinical examinations, laboratory tests, analysis of the amounts of oxygen and carbon dioxide in arterial blood, and lung function
  9. News Article
    Death rates among seriously ill COVID-19 patients dropped sharply as doctors rejected the use of mechanical ventilators, analysis has found. The chances of dying in an intensive care unit (ICU) went from 43% before the pandemic peaked to 34% in the period after. In a report, the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre said that no new drugs nor changes to clinical guidelines were introduced in that period that could account for the improvement. However, the use of mechanical ventilators fell dramatically. Before the peak in admissions on 1 April, 75.9% of COVID-19 pa
  10. News Article
    Hundreds of ventilators the UK government bought from China to relieve a major shortage are the wrong type and could kill patients, senior doctors have warned in a newly uncovered letter. The medical staff behind the letter say the devices were designed for use in ambulances rather than hospitals, had an "unreliable" oxygen supply and were of "basic" quality. Seen by Sky News' partner organisation NBC, the document also claims the ventilators cannot be cleaned properly, are an unfamiliar design and come with a confusing instruction manual. Cabinet Office minister Michael Gove tr
  11. News Article
    None of the new life-saving mechanical ventilators ordered last month to cope with the increase in coronavirus patients has so far been awarded safety approval. Models by manufacturers such as Dyson have yet to get the green light from the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, the Financial Times reported. It comes a month after the Government issued a rallying cry to put non-medical manufacturers such as Dyson on a "war footing" to make additional machines. The lag is thought to be due in part to changing clinical understanding of how best to manage the virus.
  12. News Article
    National and regional NHS chiefs will seek to share out scarce ventilators to ”areas with the most immediate need, on a fair share basis relative to patient ventilation need," they have told hospital chiefs, who are increasingly concerned about what they will receive and when. Many are expecting demand for ventilated beds to outstrip what they have as the number of patients seriously ill with covid-19 ramps up. Trust leaders yesterday told HSJ they were growing increasingly worried about the lack of information over when the machines would be sent to their trusts. Some are worried Lo
  13. Content Article
    Patient Safety Learning works with experts on guidance around ventilator safety As part of the Government’s fast track approach to the development of ventilators, the Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) issued guidance for clinical requirements based on ‘minimally acceptable’ performance. [2] Patient Safety Learning approached a range of human factors/ergonomics experts, asking for their input on the procurement of these new ventilators due to the involvement of new manufacturers, flexing of established guidelines and ‘safety in use’ issues. We asked them what
  14. News Article
    More than a quarter of patients with COVID-19 on ventilators also need renal support in the form of dialysis, raising concerns that there could be significant supply problems as countries attempt to stock up on the required fluid and plastic consumables. Nephrology consultant Graham Lipkin told The BMJ, “This is an under-recognised challenge. While the original focus has been on whether we have enough ventilators and intensive care beds, it has become apparent that there is a high incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring some form of renal replacement therapy (RRT) through dialysi
  15. News Article
    Having access to a ventilator can mean the difference between life and death for patients who are seriously ill with COVID-19, but sometimes even these breathing machines cannot save someone's life. Juanita Nittla is a chief nurse in the intensive care unit (ICU) at London's Royal Free Hospital, and has been working for the NHS as an intensive care specialist nurse for the past 16 years. Switching off ventilators is part of Juanita's job. The work is traumatic and painful, the 42-year-old says. "Sometimes I feel like I am somewhat responsible for someone's death." Medical teams
  16. News Article
    Eight in ten coronavirus patients placed on ventilators in New York City have died, according to officials. New York state has recorded more cases than any country other than America itself. The tally rose by 10,000 in 24 hours to 159,937, ahead of Spain and Italy, which at different times have reported the most infections in the world. The US, which now holds the position, had 463,433 confirmed cases yesterday and the national death toll was 16,504. Read full story Source: The Times. 10 April 2020
  17. News Article
    Doctors seeing patients with blood oxygen levels so low they are surprised they are conscious – yet they are sitting up and talking. British and American intensive care doctors at the front line of the coronavirus crisis are starting to question the aggressive use of ventilators for the treatment of patients. In many cases, they say the machines – which are highly invasive and require the patient to be rendered unconscious – are being used too early and may cause more harm than good. Instead they are finding that less invasive forms of oxygen treatment through face masks or nasal ca
  18. Content Article
    This document outlines seven key topics that designers and manufacturers of ventilators should address. Suggestions for how to address these issues and the link to the COVID-19 crisis are identified: User interface Users of ventilators Environment of use Task The risks Instructions for use Training.
  19. News Article
    NASA scientists as well as other innovators are busy developing alternatives to the traditional ventilator being used worldwide to treat severe cases of COVID-19. The movement is in response to growing evidence that in some cases ventilators can cause more harm than good in some patients with low oxygen levels. Statistics tell the story: 80% of patients with the coronavirus die on such machines. Its VITAL machine is tailored for COVID-19 patients and is focused on providing air delicately to stiff lungs — a hallmark symptom of the virus. Eight U.S. manufacturers have been selected t
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