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Found 62 results
  1. Community Post
    Call 4 Concern is an initiative started by Critical Care Outreach Nurse Consultant, Mandy Odell. Relatives/carers know our patients best - they notice the subtle signs of deterioration in their loved one. Families and carers are now able to refer straight to the Critical care outreach team directly if they feel that care has not been escalated. Want to set up a call for concern initiative in your Trust? Need some support? Are you a relative that would like it in your Trust? Leave comments below -
  2. News Article
    NHS England has shelved priorities on Long Covid and diversity and inclusion – as well as a wide range of other areas – in its latest slimmed down operational planning guidance, HSJ analysis shows. NHSE published its planning guidance for 2023-24, which sets the national “must do” asks of trust and integrated care systems, shortly before Christmas. HSJ has analysed objectives, targets and asks from the 2022-23 planning guidance which do not appear in the 2023-24 document. The measures on which trusts and systems will no longer be held accountable for include improving the service’s black, Asian and minority ethnic disparity ratio by “delivering the six high-impact actions to overhaul recruitment and promotion practices”. Another omission from the 2023-24 guidance compared to 2022-23 is a target to increase the number of patients referred to post-Covid services, who are then seen within six weeks of their referral. Several requirements on staff have been removed, including to ”continue to support the health and wellbeing of our staff, including through effective health and wellbeing conversations” and ”continued funding of mental health hubs to enable staff access to enhanced occupational health and wellbeing and psychological support”. Read full story (paywalled) Source: HSJ, 4 January 2022
  3. Content Article
    James BC and colleagues. offer a brief look at patient safety progress made over the past decades, then describe the problems exposed by the Covid-19 pandemic. To correct those problems, they call for the integration of national-level uniformity of defined best practices, and local-level redevelopment and reinforcement of robust systems-level support for staffing and processes to sustain those patient safety practices.
  4. Content Article
    Key points The study found successful strategies are typically associated with a concert of activities that simultaneously ensure sufficient supply of health care, manage demand and optimise the conditions within the health care system itself. In England in the 2000s, a number of activities were associated with reduced waiting times. These activities were concentrated within the categories of increasing supply and optimising conditions within the health care system itself to achieve the goal of an 18‑week referral to treatment target by 2008. These activities were underpinned by a bigger idea about what the health service as a whole should look and feel like, and incorporated how waiting times are brought down as much as what activities might be used. For the experts interviewed, the achievement of the 18 weeks target was made possible as a result of: valuing and investing in people working in the NHS; a clear, central vision and goal for waiting and an ambition that those working within health care felt equipped to take on; cultivating relationships and leadership at all levels of the health care system; accountability, incentives and targeted support to encourage performance against waiting times targets and other measures of quality of care; and seizing the momentum of wider NHS reform. Whereas the improvement in waiting times performance of nearly 20 years ago took place in a very different political and economic context, the research highlighted not only hope but opportunities to reduce waiting times in the present day: by addressing shortages of health care staff and physical resources urgently; by working with integrated care systems in the spirit of prevention, collaboration, inclusion and community‑based models of care; and by aligning a vision for the health services with a plan that brings staff, patients and the public along on the journey to get there.
  5. News Article
    Many people who are medically ready to leave hospital are not able to go home because of pressures in social care. Health and social care teams across Scotland are working to create more room in hospitals as we go into winter when it traditionally gets busier. In Lothian, they are using care homes as an interim measure to help rehabilitate people before they can go back home. Nineteen rooms at the Elsie Inglis Nursing Home in Edinburgh are being used in an effort to help people get out of hospital. Archie McQuater, who spent seven months in The Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh after one of his big toes was removed because of an infection, has finally got out of hospital and is now staying at the Elsie Inglis. The 94-year-old has been in the care home for two months and is trying to improve his mobility so that he can return home. Archie is among 200 people in Edinburgh who have been moved from a hospital to a care home between November 2021 and September 2022. NHS Lothian estimates it has saved about 13,000 bed days in hospitals during that time. Read full story Source: BBC News, 2 November 2022
  6. News Article
    The “social prescribing” of gardening, singing and art classes is a waste of NHS money, a study suggests. Experts found that sending patients to community activity groups had “little to no impact” on improving health or reducing demand on GP services. The research calls into question a major drive from the NHS and Department of Health to increase social prescribing as a solution to the shortage of doctors and medical staff. In 2019 the NHS set a target of referring 900,000 patients for such activities via their GP surgeries within five years. Projects receiving government funding include football to support mental health, art for dementia, community gardening and singing classes to help patients to recover from Covid. However, the study, published in the journal BMJ Open, said there was “scant evidence” to support the mass rollout of so-called “social prescribing link workers”. Read full story (paywalled) Source: The Times, 18 October 2022
  7. Content Article
    To make the best of this approach we need to make sure patients and all health care professionals including GPs and multidisciplinary hospital teams work together to: Identify anaemia early in the pathway. Make the patient aware of this and all actions going forward. Find the cause of the anaemia. Use tried and tested treatments for anaemia before surgery. This could include advice on changes in diet, oral treatments such as iron supplements and the use intravenous iron when necessary. Make sure the patient has a personalised treatment programme including providing appropriate information about the pros and cons of the different approaches suggested to the patient and how long these should be continued. Communicate clearly between different members of the team so that operations are not cancelled unnecessarily and improve the interface between primary care and hospitals. Talk openly to the patient about the benefits and risks of managing anaemia and the surgery.
  8. News Article
    NHS England has this week told trusts it is abandoning a patient safety target ‘until maternity services in England can demonstrate sufficient staffing levels’ to meet it. The Midwifery Continuity of Care model was designed to ensure expectant mothers would be cared for by the same small team of midwives throughout their pregnancy, labour and postnatal care. It was a key recommendation of 2016’s Better Births review of English midwifery services. NHSE’s chief midwifery officer for England Jacqueline Dunkley-Bent championed the policy and guidance on its implementation was issued in October. However, in her report on the care failures at Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital Trust’s maternity department, Donna Ockenden said the Midwifery Continuity of Care model should be suspended until more evidence was gathered about its effectiveness and there were enough midwives to meet minimum staffing requirements. Ms Ockenden said patient safety had been “compromised by the unprecedented pressures that Continuity of Care models of care place on maternity services already under significant strain”. Read full story (paywalled) Source: HSJ, 23 September 2022
  9. News Article
    Patients at trusts with long waiting lists should no longer think ‘they have to go to their local hospital’ for outpatient appointments, but should instead be offered virtual consultations elsewhere in the country where there is greater capacity, Sir Jim Mackey has told HSJ. The NHS England elective chief said recent efforts to abolish two-year waiters by July had meant a “very big” surgical focus. However, the next phase of the elective recovery plan would see a major shift of emphasis onto reducing the wait for outpatient appointments. Sir Jim said: “Providers have been split into tiers again with tier one having national oversight and tier two, regional oversight. Behind that we will be pairing up organisations so that organisations with capacity can help those with the biggest challenges from a virtual outpatient perspective. He added: “There still is a lot to work through [on virtual outpatients], we’re going to be testing the concept… We need to work through how all the wiring and plumbing needs to work. For example, what happens if the patient needs a diagnostic locally, having seen a clinician virtually in another part of the country? “It would be great also to try and stimulate more of a consumer drive on this – encouraging patients to ask about virtual outpatients when the waits locally may be too long, so they don’t just think they have to go to their local hospital. I think this could really help shift the model if we can get it right.” Read full story (paywalled) Source: HSJ, 9 August 2022
  10. Event
    Unsafe medication practices and medication errors are a leading cause of injury and avoidable harm in health care systems across the world. WHO Patient Safety Flagship has initiated a series of monthly webinars on the topic of “WHO Global Patient Safety Challenge: Medication Without Harm”,. The main objective of the webinar series is support implementation of this WHO Global Patient Safety Challenge: Medication Without Harm at the country level. Considering the huge burden of medication-related harm, Medication Safety has also been selected as the theme for World Patient Safety Day 2022. With each transition of care (as patients move between health providers and settings), patients are vulnerable to changes, including changes in their healthcare team, health status, and medications. Discrepancies and miscommunication are common and lead to serious medication errors, especially during hospital admission and discharge. Countries and organizations need to optimise patient safety as patients navigate the healthcare system by setting long-term leadership commitment, defining goals to improve medication safety at transition points of care, developing a strategic plan with short- and long-term objectives, and establishing structures to ensure goals are achieved. At this webinar, you will be introduced to the WHO technical report on “Medication Safety in Transitions of Care,” including the key strategies for improving medication safety during transitions of care. Register
  11. Event
    This conference focuses on Prehabilitation – Principles and Practice, and will provide a practical guide to delivering an effective prehabilitation programme, ensuring patients are fit and optimised for surgery/treatment. This is even more important in light of the Covid-19 pandemic and lockdowns which have had a negative effect on many individual’s health and fitness levels, and currently high waiting lists could be used as preparation time to ensure the best outcomes. The conference will look at preoperative/pre treatment optimisation of patients fitness and wellbeing through exercise, nutrition and psychological support. This conference will enable you to: Network with colleagues who are working to deliver effective prehabilitation for surgery/treatment Reflect on a patient lived experience to understand how to engage patients in prehab programmes Learn from outstanding practice in implementing a prehabilitation programme Embed virtual prehabilitation into your programme during and beyond Covid-19 Demonstrate a business case for prehabilitation and ensure prehab services continue through and beyond the pandemic Reflect on national developments and learning Improve the way we support patients to prepare themselves, physically and emotionally for surgery/treatment Develop your skills in Behaviour Change and Motivational Interviewing Embed virtual prehabilitation into your programme during and beyond Covid-19 Learn from case studies Understand how you can improve emotional and psychological support Explore the role of prehabilitation in older people Work with patients to improve nutrition Ensure you are up to date with the latest evidence Self assess and reflect on your own practice Supports CPD professional development and acts as revalidation evidence. This course provides 5 Hrs training for CPD subject to peer group approval for revalidation purposes. Register
  12. Event
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    In order to support the NHS Priorities set out for 2022/2023 in delivering significantly more elective care to tackle the elective backlog and to reduce long waits, we take a look at the developing approaches to patient care using collaborations with providers delivering treatments in the home in order to support patient flow. This webinar will explore: How teams have innovated to provide hospital-at-home during the Covid-19 crisis and what’s needed to maintain the momentum of change? What is the future direction for hospital-at-home, post-pandemic, and what will accelerate or prevent adoption at scale? Evaluation and evidence required to support the case for change. Register
  13. Event
    This conference will provide a practical guide to delivering an effective prehabilitation programme, ensuring patients are fit for cancer surgery or treatment. This is even more important in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdowns which have had a negative effect on many individual’s health and fitness levels. The conference will look at optimisation of patients fitness and wellbeing through exercise, nutrition and psychological support. Register
  14. Event
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    The NHS spends £8.3 billion a year treating chronic wounds on an estimated 3.8 million people, according to the recently updated study evaluating the “Burden of Wounds” to the NHS. Costs have increased by 48% in the five years since the study was first published and the overwhelming majority of this burgeoning demand, around 80% of the caseload, impacts on community healthcare. This webinar will explore the “Burden of Wounds” with study author Julian Guest and consider how digital wound management solutions can relieve pressure and improve outcomes. We’ll see case studies from community nurses, hear the patient and staff view through #tvn2gether and the National Wound Care Strategy team will share their long term vision. Chaired by Margaret Kitching MBE, Chief Nurse for NHS England and NHS Improvement’s North East and Yorkshire Region, this conversation brings together leading voices within wound care to discuss new strategies for 2021 and beyond. Register
  15. Event
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    There are many sources of variation in healthcare that can affect the flow of patients through care systems. Reducing and managing variation enables systems to become more predictable and easier to manage so allowing improvement of quality and safety. To effect successful service improvements, you need to understand the source of variation and use a range of tools to reduce and manage it. This pandemic has provoked the best of human compassion and solidarity, but those who manage our health systems still face extraordinary challenges responding to COVID-19. Looking beyond the crisis, our collective learning about the effects of the large falls in healthcare use can help inform and intensify efforts to reduce unnecessary care. The aim of this webinar is to build a culture of collaborative working across the healthcare workforce and reduce variation to prevent avoidable harm to patients, enhance healthcare equity, and improve the sustainability of health systems everywhere. Register
  16. Event
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    In this Westminster Health Forum event, delegates will assess the priorities for improving lung health in England. Areas for discussion include: responding to the pandemic, and the challenges of long COVID lung health in the implementation of the NHS Long Term Plan optimising respiratory prescribing promoting prevention and addressing inequalities, including air quality improvement and developing healthy communities next steps for integrated respiratory care, rehabilitation and care at a local level research, innovation and priorities for service transformation. Register
  17. Event
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    One of the great opportunities for ICSs may be around reducing future demand for healthcare by ensuring that people remain healthy or are helped to reduce the chances of deteriorating if they do develop an illness or long-term condition. Prevention and early intervention underlie much of the NHS Long Term Plan, with a recognition that the NHS can no longer simply be an “ill health” service and instead bends to think about prevention and reducing health inequalities. Many ICSs are keen to develop this role and bring together the organisations they represent – across both the NHS and local authorities –to work collaboratively on this. But with resources and time limited, they may need to concentrate their efforts on particular areas. The second wave of covid – and the prospect of widespread vaccination starting within weeks - has added a new dimension to this with an urgent need to reduce the pressure covid places on the NHS and on normal life in general. This webinar will ask: has covid helped focus the NHS’s eyes on prevention? where are the “easy wins” for ICSs where interventions are most likely to have significant results within a reasonable timeframe? what key steps do ICSs need to take to get the maximum benefit from these? How can they build common purpose among their members to ensure these happen? how can public health be made “business as usual” for everyone working in the NHS – including those in hospitals? how can ICSs balance the preventative interventions which deliver short-term benefits with those which take longer to offer a “return on investment”? Register
  18. Event
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    Over the last twenty years in particular, the NHS has been focusing on how to create better care pathways that improve patient outcomes. Improving care pathways has a positive impact on clinical outcomes, cost reduction, patient satisfaction, teamwork and process outcomes, but COVID-19 has created a significant disconnect in these pathways meaning patients are either not entering them or not flowing through them as smoothly as they need to. The administrative elements of managing patients through pathways are significant and, at a time when the NHS is experiencing workforce shortages, routinely take staff away from caring for and reassuring patients. At this King's Fund event, decision points within pathways will be explored and how digital technology can transform how pathways operate, enabling clinicians to better understand where each patient is on the pathway, what they are waiting for and what needs to happen next. Learn how to improve pathway ‘hand-offs’ and administration, to free up time for staff to care for patients in a more personalised way. The event will include examples of how industry and the NHS can come together to build smarter pathways, using technology to augment the expertise of caregivers. Register for free
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