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Found 1,169 results
  1. News Article
    The number of people waiting over a year for hospital treatment in England has hit its highest levels since 2008. Patients are meant to be seen within 18 weeks - but nearly 140,000 of the 4.35 million on the waiting list at the end of September had waited over a year. Surgeons said it was "tragic" patients were being left in pain while they waited for treatment, including knee and hip operations. And others warned the situation could become even worse during winter. In recent weeks, major hospitals in Bradford, Leeds, Nottingham, Birmingham and Liverpool, which have seen high rates of infection, have announced the mass cancellation of non-urgent work. Read full story Source: BBC News, 12 November 2020
  2. Content Article
    Coronavirus – Top 10 tips on what to do in primary care Paediatrics top tips: COVID-19 relating to children and young people - Tips for assessing children and young people presenting with potential COVID-19 symptoms. Changes to death certification - A brief screencast summarising the latest changes in death certification, in response to COVID-19. COVID-19: Myth Busting - A short module highlighting the facts from the fakes. Management of the long term effects of COVID-19 - The RCGP response and top tips for caring for our patients.
  3. Content Article
    Consider your balance between remote and face to face care – have you got it right and how might it need to change in the months to come? Think about how you are going to manage respiratory symptoms over the winter and be aware of the issues with COVID-19 in children and what to do if resuscitation is needed.Shielding is paused and is unlikely to return in the same form as at the start of the pandemic.Know about the standard operating procedure (SOP) for primary care Appraisal is restarting in a very light-touch way and there are other changes to administration.Continue to wear PPE when seeing patients face to face, and continue planning for a much bigger flu vaccination season than usual. Death certification requirements are relaxed for as long as the Coronavirus Act is in force.Look after yourself and your staff.Continue to plan ahead; this will be a marathon, not a sprint.Your core clinical skills are still important.
  4. Content Article
    Lecture content How common is smell loss in COVID-19? Does it get better? How does it position relative to other symptoms of the pandemic? How is it different to typical smell loss seen with other viruses? What about taste? Why bother with smell loss?
  5. News Article
    Study finds 54 days after discharge, 69% of patients still had fatigue, and 53% were suffering from persistent breathlessness. Almost seven out of 10 patients hospitalised due to coronavirus still suffer from debilitating symptoms more than seven weeks after being discharged, according to a new study. Researchers from the University College London (UCL) division of medicine, in collaboration with with clinicians at the Royal Free London (RFL) and UCL, followed 384 patients who had tested positive and had been treated at Barnet Hospital, the Royal Free Hospital or UCLH. Collectively the average length of stay in hospital was 6.5 days. The team found that 54 days after discharge, 69% of patients were still experiencing fatigue, and 53% were suffering from persistent breathlessness. They also found that 34% still had a cough and 15% reported depression. In addition 38% of chest radiographs (X-rays) remained abnormal and 9% were getting worse. Dr Swapna Mandal, an honorary clinical associate professor at UCL division of medicine, said the data shows so-called long COVID is a real phenomenon and that further research is needed to understand how the symptoms of COVID-19 can be treated over an extended period. She said: "Patients whose COVID-19 illness is serious enough for them to require hospital care often continue to suffer significant symptoms for many weeks after their discharge." Read full story Source: Sky News, 11 November 2020
  6. News Article
    Patients, including those with the coronavirus, are being kept “head to toe” on trolleys in accident and emergency departments in Manchester, with some forced to wait up to 40 hours for a bed. The “dangerous” situation has sparked warnings from the president of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine over the “potentially lethal” crowding of patients in A&Es across the country this winter. Katherine Henderson said she was “absolutely terrified” by what was happening in some departments. She said she had warned NHS England about the dangers of crowding patients in A&E but that not enough action had been taken. She told The Independent: “Crowding in A&E is unsafe, but with coronavirus it is potentially lethal. We have said this endlessly to NHS England." “Everyone agrees crowding is bad, but what they’re not doing is translating that into action.” After hearing of the situation in Manchester, she added: “Exactly what we said should not happen is happening. I am absolutely terrified by this. What more can I do? I have highlighted this risk everywhere I can over the past few months.” Read full story Source: The Independent, 11 November 2020
  7. News Article
    Early results from trials of a Covid vaccine developed in Russia suggest it could be 92% effective. The data is based on 20 cases of COVID-19 from 16,000 volunteers given the Sputnik V vaccine or a dummy injection. While some scientists welcomed the news, others said the data had been rushed out too early. It comes after Pfizer and BioNTech said their vaccine could prevent 90% of people getting Covid-19, based on a study of 43,500 people. Although the Sputnik data is based on fewer people being vaccinated and fewer cases of Covid developing during the trial, it does confirm promising results from earlier research. The Sputnik V vaccine, developed at the National Research Centre for Epidemiology and Microbiology in Moscow, is currently going through phase III clinical trials in Belarus, UAE, Venezuela and India. So far there are no safety issues, with Russian researchers saying there were "no unexpected adverse events" 21 days after volunteers received their first of two injections. Read full story Source: BBC News, 11 November 2020
  8. Content Article
    Top tips for caring for patients whilst waiting for the NICE/SIGN/RCGP guidance: 1. Post COVID-19 syndrome is a real condition. Believe your patient, listen, show empathy and acknowledge the diagnosis. 2. You do not need a positive SARS-CoV-2 test, or have been admitted to hospital to be diagnosed with post COVID-19 syndrome. Anyone with an acute infection of COVID-19, however mild, can go on to develop post COVID-19 syndrome. 3. Post COVID-19 syndrome is a multisystem disease. Do not dismiss ongoing COVID-19 symptoms as anxiety or due to psychological cause. A full history and appropriate examination is needed to understand the impact of COVID19 on your patient. 4. Possible investigation and treatment pathway whilst waiting for the national guidance to be produced. It is essential to exclude underlying pathology and “red flags” that require further investigation and treatment, before a diagnosis of post COVID-19 syndrome is made. Review and investigate the patient, as clinically indicated, at any stage of their illness; you do not need to wait until 12 weeks for this process to begin. 5. Other current and upcoming RCGP resources on managing the long term effects of COVID-19. RCGP will continue to update the educational information as the evidence emerges and the national guidance is produced in December 2020.
  9. Event
    This Westminster Health Forum conference will focus on key issues for clinical negligence in the NHS and priorities for NHS resolution. The discussion is bringing together stakeholders with a range of key policy officials who are due to attend from DHSC; the Government Legal Department; HM Treasury; the MOJ and the NAO. The discussion at a glance: a patient safety culture - assessing progress and next steps in its development in the context of the NHS Patient Safety Strategy and the publication of the first Annual progress report COVID-19 - the impact on clinical negligence risk and increased clinical negligence claims the workforce - priorities for support through a period of unprecedented pressure legal costs - options for mitigation and policy. Register
  10. News Article
    A new NHS treatment programme targeting young people with eating disorders has been launched amid a rise in numbers needing treatment during the coronavirus pandemic. Recent NHS data showed record numbers of children and young people are currently being treated across England for eating disorders while waiting times in some places are dangerously long. On Monday, children’s charity NSPCC warned that counselling sessions for eating and body image disorders rose by 32% after lockdown was introduced in March. The new scaling up of intervention services for those with eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia will mean young people can gain access to rapid specialist NHS treatment across England. The service will be rolled out to 18 sites, building on a successful trial model at King's College London, where one patient described the treatment as the “gold standard” of care. Nadine Dorries, Minister for Health, said: “Eating disorders can have a devastating impact on individuals and their families – and can very sadly be fatal. I am committed to ensuring young people have access to the services and treatment they need which can ultimately save lives." Read full story Source: The Independent, 10 November 2020
  11. News Article
    The mutated strain of coronavirus from Danish mink could have “grave consequences”, Matt Hancock warned today. The Health Secretary said the new variant was a “significant development”. And he told MPs the new form of the virus “did not fully respond to Covid-19 antibodies” - hinting it might not respond in the same way to a vaccine. The UK banned travel and freight from Denmark on Saturday, going further than the current 14-day quarantine system. Those who had already passed from Denmark to Britain in the previous 14 days must isolate for two weeks. Updating the House of Commons, Mr Hancock said: “We’ve been monitoring the spread of coronavirus in European mink farms for some time, especially the major countries for mink farming like Denmark, Spain, Poland and the Netherlands. “On Thursday evening last I was alerted to a significant development in Denmark of a new evidence that the virus had spread back from mink to humans in a variant form that did not fully respond to Covid-19 antibodies. “Although the chance of this variant becoming widespread is low, the consequences should that happen would be grave.” Read full story Source: The Mirror, 10 November 2020
  12. Content Article
    The toolkit explores the three phases of how we normally respond to a crisis; Emergency – at the beginning of a crisis there is high energy. A sense of urgency and a common goal brings teams together and things get done. Regression – our sense of purpose becomes less clear, energy levels drop, people get frustrated and are less productive. Recovery – new goals emerge, and we begin to focus on rebuilding rather than simply surviving. An end, or at least a new sense of normality, is in sight. The aim of this framework is to help people begin to think about how they might move to Recovery. The workshop consists of a 90 minute session that can be delivered online or in person. The toolkit, along with some guidance on how to run it: How to guide Proposal Framework for learning Lesson plan Presentation Action plan For more information or support on using the toolkit please contact paul.gimson@wales.nhs.uk social media @improvementcymru
  13. News Article
    The NHS is ready to start providing the new coronavirus vaccine "as fast as safely possible", Health Secretary Matt Hancock has said. Asked whether it could be available by Christmas, he said that was "absolutely a possibility" - but he expected the mass roll-out "in the first part of next year". He said vaccination clinics would be open seven days a week, and he was giving GPs an extra £150m. On Monday, early results from the world's first effective coronavirus vaccine showed it could prevent more than 90% of people from getting Covid. The vaccine has been developed by pharmaceutical companies Pfizer and BioNTech and is one of 11 vaccines that are currently in the final stages of testing. The UK has already ordered 40 million doses - enough to vaccinate up to 20 million people as each person will need two doses for it to work effectively. Asked how many people would need to be vaccinated before life can return to normal, Matt Hancock said: "Well the answer to that is we just don't know." "So the trials can tell you if a vaccine is clinically safe and if it's effective at protecting an individual from the disease. What we can't know, until we've vaccinated a significant proportion of the population, is how much it stops the transmission of the disease." Mr Hancock told BBC Radio 4's Today programme it would be "a mammoth logistical operation" and highlighted some of the challenges, including getting it from Belgium to the UK while not removing from a temperature of -70C more than four times. Older care home residents and care home staff are at the top of a list from government scientific advisers of who would get immunised first, followed by health workers. Mr Hancock said NHS staff would go into care homes to vaccinate residents, as well as setting up vaccination venues. Children would not be vaccinated, he said. However, Prof Sir John Bell from Oxford University said: "I would worry about not giving this to as wide a percentage of the population as we can." "I'm more of the view that we need to vaccinate further into the population and vaccinate younger people as well, partly because we don't really know what the long term effects of this disease are." The vaccine will not be released for use until it passes final safety tests and gets the go-ahead from the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency. Read full story Source: BBC News, 10 November 2020
  14. News Article
    In small room in the Royal Derby Hospital, there's a table bearing a laminated sign. "You are not alone," it says. It continues: "Kindness will get you through. Embrace the challenge. Look after each other. You are stronger than you think." This is the "wobble room", set aside not for patients but for front-line staff to get them away - briefly - from the intense pressure and strain experienced in the first wave of COVID-19. "We made a wobble room because that's what we needed," Kelly-Ann Gurney, an intensive-care nurse, told the BBC. "It's a room where staff could just go and sit and cry if they needed to and get it all out and then come back and 'put their face on' and get back into it again." Now the second wave is hitting the hospital, and the need for the room is just as great. Concerns are growing about the physical and mental health of front-line NHS staff. There has been no lull since the April peak of the virus as normal treatments and operations, postponed during the crisis, have returned to hospitals. Caroline Swan, a senior sister and manager of the intensive care unit at the Royal Derby, says she is ready to face what is ahead but feels very tired. "I am also very concerned. My staff are very tired and stressed out. We have a lot of sickness either due to burnout or they are unwell," she says. "A lot of staff have to self-isolate at home - and that puts a lot of strain on staffing here." Dr Magnus Harrison, medical director of the University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Trust, says managing rotas is getting harder due to staff sickness and the need for some to self-isolate if family members are infected. "It is worth acknowledging what staff did in the first wave. They behaved tremendously and worked incredibly hard, and we're expecting them to do it again in winter - and Covid numbers could be higher than in the first wave. People are tired out." Read full story Source: BBC News, 10 November 2020
  15. News Article
    One in five COVId-19 patients were diagnosed with a mental illness for the first time within three months of their infection, a study has shown. Mental health experts said the findings, which were based on an analysis of the electronic medical records of 69 million people in the US, suggest that coronavirus survivors could have an increased risk of developing psychiatric disorders. Of the almost 70 million people whose records were examined in the study, 62,354 individuals had confirmed COVID-19 cases. Researchers at the University of Oxford and the NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre found that one in five of these patients went on to receive a first time diagnosis of anxiety, depression or insomnia within 90 days of testing positive for the virus. This was roughly twice as high as the figure for other individuals over the same time frame, according to the researchers. People with a history of mental health disorders who contracted the virus were also discovered to be more likely to have new psychiatric diagnoses. Paul Harrison, a psychiatry professor at the University of Oxford who led the research, said: "People have been worried that COVID-19 survivors will be at greater risk of mental health problems, and our findings in a large and detailed study show this to be likely. Read full story Source: The Independent, 10 November 2020
  16. News Article
    The NHS will rollout twice-weekly asymptomatic testing for all patient-facing staff by the end of next week, according to a letter from NHS medical director Stephen Powis. Government said only last week that universal asymptomatic staff testing would start in December, but government has now agreed it will bring this forward to this week for a first tranche of 34 trusts; and all others next week. The tests at 34 trusts this week will cover “over 250,000 staff,” Professor Powis said. He set out plans for the new testing regime in a letter to Commons health and social care committee chair Jeremy Hunt who has been pressing the government for routine staff testing since the summer. “Staff will be asked to test themselves at home twice a week with results available before coming into work,” Professor Powis said. The new testing regime can start following “further scientific validation of the lateral flow testing modality last week, and confirmation over the weekend from Test and Trace that they can now supply the NHS with sufficient test kits”. Read full story Source: HSJ, 9 November 2020
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