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  2. Content Article
    The research provided some key insights for teams that develop, publish and maintain health information: Small changes can make a big difference. Adding short explanations about the way patient data is used to inform health information had an influential impact on the readers’ perception of the health advice. Explaining can help build trust. Including explanations about the use of patient data can help increase levels of trust and credibility of the information provided. Improving awareness of how the system works. Including explanations of patient data use was linked wit
  3. Content Article
    Key findings The environmental scan revealed that while patient safety events, overall, were characterised by racial and ethnic disparities, methodological challenges—primarily related to data availability—limited in-depth analysis of this finding. The environmental scan also indicated that racism and its impact on patient safety events was more often discussed in editorials than in peer-reviewed and grey literature. Subject-matter expert interviews indicated that various levels of racism ranging from internalized and interpersonal to institutional and systemic directly impa
  4. Content Article
    The study found that of the 60 268 adverse incidents, falls were the most common event (36%), followed by behaviour-related events (33%), other impacts and injuries (22%) and medication errors (9%). The number of adverse incidents per resident ranged from 0 (42%) to 171, with a median of 2. Women and residents with low care needs were significantly less likely to adverse incidents compared with men and residents with high care needs respectively. This study demonstrates that data already collected within electronic management systems can provide crucial baseline information about the risk
  5. News Article
    Legal costs in some lower-value medical negligence claims can be double or even triple the amount of compensation paid to patients. Figures in the Medical Defence Union’s (MDU’s) annual report for 2021 reveal the average sum paid in claimants’ legal costs on medical claims settled for up to £10,000 was in excess of £18,500. For claims settled between £10,000 and £25,000, the average was nearly £35,000. The not-for-profit indemnifier called on the Government to proceed quickly with the reforms needed to the clinical negligence system to make disproportionate legal costs a thin
  6. News Article
    A shortage of some medicines is putting patients at risk, pharmacists have warned. A poll of 1,562 UK pharmacists for the Pharmaceutical Journal found more than half (54%) believed patients had been put at risk in the past six months due to shortages. A number of patients have been facing difficulties accessing some medicines in recent months, sometimes having to go to multiple pharmacies to find their prescription or needing to go back to their GP to be prescribed an alternative. Since June, the government has issued a number of "medicine supply notifications", which highlight
  7. News Article
    Last month saw the highest number of ambulance callouts for life-threatening conditions since records began, NHS England officials say. There were more than 85,000 category one calls, for situations like cardiac arrests and people stopping breathing. The heatwave could have been one reason for increased demand, but experts say hospitals already face immense pressures. Nearly 30,000 patients waited more than 12 hours to be admitted to hospital. The number is up 33% on the previous month and the highest since records began in 2010. Richard Murray, chief executive of The
  8. News Article
    Criminals have issued ‘demands’ to an NHS IT supplier targeted by a cyber attack, leading health chiefs to fear they have accessed confidential patient data, HSJ has learned. IT firm Advanced was targeted last week. The company provides electronic patient records to several trusts and most NHS 111 providers. Multiple government agencies – including the National Crime Agency and GCHQ – are now working to identify the extent of the damage caused by the attackers, while leaders of affected mental health trusts have warned of a “pretty desperate” situation as staff are unable to access
  9. Content Article
    Key points Digital technology supports everything we do in safety-critical industries. There are also hidden digital problems that affect everything we do, and things will go wrong. IT-related problems can have significant consequences for justice, as well as safety and security. The formal qualifications and relevant experience required for system designers in safety-critical sectors are often not specified in the way that they are for front-line staff. We have to manage digital risks more effectively to prevent associated incidents and even miscarriages of just
  10. Last week
  11. News Article
    NHS England has revealed plans to crack down on poor care being provided by mental health service providers. There will be a particular focus on independent units treating NHS patients, as just over a quarter of these providers are failing to meet quality standards. Official data shared with HSJ shows that of the 238 independent NHS mental health providers licensed by the Care Quality Commission in England, 174 (73 per cent) are classed as “good” or “outstanding”. The remaining 64 (27 per cent) either “require improvement” or are considered “inadequate”. There have
  12. Content Article
    The book aims to provide well-founded, practical guidance to those responsible for leading and implementing human factors programmes and interventions in health and social care. It's structured around the different levels of a system, where practitioners might place their focus. For each level, the nature of issues that are frequently addressed is given, followed by a characterisation of available human factors methods and approaches. Then, a selection of representative and important human factors methods and approaches is described in detail using a practical example, helping guide practition
  13. News Article
    A woman with fast-growing stage-four breast cancer says the NHS has let her down, with delays at every stage of her treatment. Caroline Boulton, 56, had several appointments for a mammogram, which checks for early signs of cancer, cancelled because of Covid, in March and November 2020. In late 2021, she found a small lump, went to her GP and was referred urgently to a specialist - but then the delays began. "They haven't moved quickly enough," Ms Boulton says, who lives in Greater Manchester. "It's been really, really slow." "Between each appointment, each scan, there's bee
  14. News Article
    A cyber attack that has caused a major outage of NHS IT systems is expected to last for more than three weeks, leaving doctors unable to see patients’ notes, The Independent has learned. Mental health trusts across the country will be left unable to access patient notes for weeks, and possibly months. Oxford Health Foundation Trust has declared a critical incident over the outage, which is believed to affect dozens of trusts, and has told staff it is putting emergency plans in place. One NHS trust chief said the situation could possibly last for “months” with several mental heal
  15. News Article
    England’s mental health inpatient system is “running very hot” and operating well above recommended occupancy levels, HSJ has been told, as new funding to address the problem is revealed. The move was announced by NHS England mental health director Claire Murdoch in an exclusive interview with HSJ. It comes amid a steep rise in mental health patients waiting more than 12 hours in accident and emergency. Last month, an HSJ investigation revealed 12-hour waits for people in crisis had ballooned by 150% in 2022 compared to pre-pandemic levels. Problems finding specialist beds have been
  16. News Article
    All children aged one to nine and living in Greater London will be offered a polio vaccine after the virus was detected in sewage. The virus, which can cause paralysis, has been found 116 times in London's wastewater since February. The urgent immunisation campaign will see nearly a million children offered the vaccine - including those already up to date with their jabs. Parents and carers will be contacted by their GP within the next month. Polio is seen as a disease of the past in the UK after the whole of Europe was declared polio-free in 2003. Dr Vanessa Saliba, a
  17. News Article
    A 35-year-old mum says she's been left crippled by surgical mesh implanted into her body allegedly without her informed consent. Listen to her story here or click on the video below. Source: New Zealand Herald, 9 August 2022
  18. Event
    This Westminster Health Forum policy conference will examine the key priorities for the future of cancer prevention, diagnosis, care and treatment as the Government develops a 10-year Cancer Plan for England. Delegates will discuss priorities for the next stage of the elective care backlog delivery plan, including meeting demand as waiting times for new referrals increase, and what can be learned from success in clearing the longest waiting times for patients. With questions about the future of the National Insurance increase and social care funding, it will be an opportunity to disc
  19. Event
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    In the face of new challenges, developing requirements, and restructuring of local systems within the NHS it’s vital to bring together the Digital Health community again. HETT 2022 will explore the systems and infrastructure that underpin and enable a data-driven NHS, supporting the ecosystem to deliver patient outcomes through the meaningful implementation of technology. Two days of free CPD accredited educational sessions, interactive activities, and networking opportunities with 150+ innovative suppliers and 200+ expert speakers. Further information and registration
  20. News Article
    The Senate passed a sweeping budget package Sunday intended to bring financial relief to Americans, but not before Republican senators voted to strip a proposal that would have capped the price of insulin at $35 per month for many patients. A proposal that limits the monthly cost of insulin to $35 for Medicare patients was left untouched. But using a parliamentary rule, GOP lawmakers were able to jettison the part of the proposal that would apply to privately insured patients. Lowering the price of drugs such as insulin, which is used by diabetics to manage their blood sugar levels,
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