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Keep up to date with the latest news, research and activity in patient safety

Patient Safety Movement Foundation, the American Society of Anesthesiologists, The Leapfrog Group, and ISQua join forces for #UniteForSafeCare World Patient Safety Day campaign

Today, four leading global organisations dedicated to fighting preventable deaths due to medical errors announced their partnership to co-convene the #uniteforsafecare programme on World Patient Safety Day (September 17, 2020).

In June, the Patient Safety Movement Foundation announced the wide-ranging campaign to bring attention to system-wide improvements that will ensure better health worker and patient safety outcomes, called #uniteforsafecare. Now, the organisation will be joined by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), The Leapfrog Group, and International Society for Quality in Health Care (ISQua) in co-convening the slate of programming, which includes a virtual physical challenge to raise awareness of the issue; collaboration with the National Association for Healthcare Quality’s annual conference, NEXT; an in-person demonstration in Washington, D.C. and a free virtual event for the public and those who have experienced errors, harms, or death to themselves or loved ones.

“As the first medical specialty to advocate for patient safety, and as physicians on the front lines treating COVID-19 patients, we know firsthand how critical ensuring health worker safety is,” said ASA President Mary Dale Peterson.  “The issue is especially timely.  From having the appropriate PPE to strategies for stress management and wellness – ensuring health worker safety is patient safety and improves outcomes.  We are happy to participate in this effort to advance safety in health care.”

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Coronavirus '90-minute tests to be provided in care homes and hospitals'

Two new tests for COVID-19 that are said to deliver results within 90 minutes are to be introduced across NHS hospitals and care homes, to speed up diagnosis ahead of winter and differentiate coronavirus infection from flu, the government says.

But some experts were surprised by the government’s decision, saying the particular tests were not well-known. No data had been published concerning their evaluation. The government had made mistakes in buying tests that turned out to be sub-standard in the past, they said.

“Repeatedly through the pandemic the government has raced ahead purchasing tests on the basis of manufacturer’s claims, and have found later when independent studies are done that the tests do not have adequate performance for use in the NHS,” said Professor Jon Deeks from Birmingham University, part of a team who have been evaluating tests of this sort.

“We would hope that the government would wait for proper evaluations, and consider the scientific evidence for all available tests before signing further contracts. The mistakes made in test purchasing have wasted millions of pounds as well as put lives at risk.”

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Source: The Guardian, 3 August 2020

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